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Echo Cross Section by Maurys - Finished


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  • 2 weeks later...

Druxey,  The jig is right out of Ed Tosti's log.  The upper parts on the two sides are fixed, providing resistance when the "battens" are inserted in the slots and the screws tightened, pushing down on the lower braces thus holding down the frame parts while the glue dries. 

Maury

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Slow progress.  Frames now glued up.  I'm tree-nailing thru all chocks for added support.  I suspended a block off the end of the work bench to create a rigid support while "center-punching" the layout for the tree nail holes.  Then they were all drilled (#76 drill bit).  I recall an earlier discussion (I think Toni at the Echo Workshop) where the tree-nail layout was customarilly the upper nail was forward of the bottom of each pair.  Now I have to pull a bunch of bamboo.

Maury

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The frames are now set to be erected.  A temporary cross member is glued across the top edge of the frame with marks lined up with the edge of the rising wood.  Several squares are used to align with the building board and my Incra rule provides a plumb line from the rising wood to the mark on the cross member.  Once the first (DF) frame is in place and the glue dry, I can procede with DF1, 1Fore and 1aft. I cut the notches for the sweep ports on DF1 and after it was in place, I dry-fitted 1fore and marked the tops and bottoms of the notches.  THe frame was then removed, notches cut and replaced on the keel.  Specially-sized spacers are inserted between frames while the glue dries.

Greg, on the framing plan, there is a horizontal line above the scupper-support "boxes".  Does this define the inboard top of the scupper support?  It's a pretty big angle so I want to be sure beforepost-923-0-58116700-1362949416.jpg I notch the next frame.

Maury

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Maury,

 

Correct. The small lines between the frames delineates the top of the inboard scupper box (fore) and the pump discharge (aft). I would hold off on these until David covers these in his cross-section updates. You'll want to make sure you deck and waterways are correctly installed first I should think.

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Greg and Druxey,

Thanks for the input.  I cut the notches for the port sills while the frames were flat on the building board (Fore frame first, then temporarily install the aft frame and mark carefully) and thought I'd do the same for the scuppers.  I'll hold off for now.  More progress last evening...two more frames raised...no pictures since the alignment process is the same as the last pictures posted.  The Byrnes thickness sander is real handy for getting the frame spacers to the exact thickness.

Maury

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While linig up the (temporary) cross support on top of frame 3 Aft, I found it not lining up with the plan.  Seems when I accidently broke it at the lower chock and re-glued, it wasn't lined up properly.  Rather than re do the whole frame, it seemed like just the sections above the lower chock were out of line.  Part of a paper towel, soaked in 91% Isopropyl Alcohol then wrapped with Saran Wrap for and hour and it cape apart easily.  Trimmed one side  and re-glued.

Maury

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Frame 3-Aft repaired and raised.  Spacing is set versus the 3rd frame forward (2-fore) so the gun port is the proper width.  The frame was temporarily set, notches marked to match the heights of the forward frame and then removed so the notches could be cut.  Now glued, braced and drying.

Maury

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Frames all raised, plumb, square, even.  First shot is with all the cross-braces still in place.  The next is with all intermediate braces removed.  The ones on the fore and aft ends are left in place being used to insure the frames at the ends are plumb.  Last shot shows the carefully measured spacers between the frames being glued.  I did the first four frames, then moved to the aft and did four spacers moving toward the center.  Then I filled in the remaining.  I held the frames fairly even with each other by running some stringers inboard and out (held with the blue clamp).  I could slide the frames fore and aft without pushing them in or out.  They are not faired yet, but it kept them in close position.  Next up are the port sills.  Very challenging.  I suspect a lot more pieces for the scrap box.

Maury

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Work on the sills.  I had a bit to take off the two lower frame parts so a new sanding stick with some 80 and 120 grits made short work of the job.  The vibration of sanding loosened the boat from the building board a bit.  Next time I sand like that I'll put a beam across the frames and clamp it down.

 

  I made a trial sill on some scrap.  It went easier than I had feared.  After getting the length about right, I sanded the pieces on an angle to get the two shapes.  A couple of bad ones (too much of an angle, a hair too short) but two little pieces into the trash is nothing.

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I think you'll be fine with the alchohol as long as you don't flood the temp spacers with it.  I use a artist's brush to apply the alcohol to the area I want to loosen.  Sometimes takes a couple of applications to loosen the piece, but eventually the glue gives up.   :)

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In addition, Maury, I would use a fine x-Acto blade or better still, small holes drilled down the center of the spacer to slice it in two. That way you can easily debond each glued joint individually. If you glued the bottom of the sill to the spacers it will probably come out with them but sills are easily replaced. Just apply alcohol to the mortises and scrape out any residual glue.

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