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how do you decide on what kit to build


lionfish
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with me,  I tend to build the type of ships I like..........but since I started to go rogue with the kits,  I've gotten into modifying and scratch building.  this has been a good.....and bad thing,  because of all the crazy ideas that have popped into my head.  but,  it's led to some really cool builds.   as long as I'm having fun,  I'm happy  :)

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with me,  I tend to build the type of ships I like..........but since I started to go rogue with the kits,  I've gotten into modifying and scratch building.  this has been a good.....and bad thing,  because of all the crazy ideas that have popped into my head.  but,  it's led to some really cool builds.   as long as I'm having fun,  I'm happy  :)

 

Some amazing builds you mean ;)   Keep on keeping on Popeye - your scratch builds are a thing of inspiration!

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I prefer something different than the norm these days.  My Billing's Wasa got me started as one didn't see many of them being built when I was building her.  Then the Constellation as I had walked her decks in the mid-70's with a bit of reseach and it was "heavy bash" time.  :)   Licorne.. is well... rare as a model but has a tale.   Up next?  Not sure but it won't be a Vic or Constitution.   Probably either Roebuck or Raleigh.  Nice looking ships, interesting histories and again, not often built.   Yes, I'm an oddball I think.

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1. Start by looking at all the kits I'd like to build

2. Eliminate all of those I can't afford, which is about 95% of those

3. Go back and add ones that MAYBE I could get if I stretch my budged a little (or a lot)

4. Look as which of those kits will be a nice step up in difficultly from previous builds.

5. Throw all caution and rationalizations aside and ignore steps 1-4 and go the one that just appeals to me most.

 

The final kit usually ends up being something unusual that not everyone else is building, is an actual, researchable historic vessel or small craft, and gives me an opportunity to learn about the ship, the technology, the period history or culture that often isn't commonly known, at least to me.

 

Then, like so many others, I usually put it in the closet with all the other kits I haven't had time to get to...

 

Clare

Edited by catopower
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Almost a year ago I though I would be done with my HMS VIctory and at the time I was CERTAIN I wanted to build a brig of some sort. They always look good to me when I see images of them and with just two masts, more manageable.

NOW almost a year later I AM almost done with HMS Victory and I have decided to build something small for a change of pace and in the mistaken assumption the small project will move faster. I narrowed it down to two vessels plus a third, none of them are brigs. Where was my enthusiasm for the brig? Its still there but for some reason, in the intervening time, my intent and intention drifted to the three new subjects. I will still make the brig at some point, maybe when the stars align properly again and I feel ready for a more ambitious project I can commit time to. The small subjects are likely to only take a little time in comparison. I did the photoshop work reducing the drafts of the hulls and cut out the blocks of wood for the hulls and all three of them are under 11" long. Two are of smaller craft I will build to 1/48 scale and the third is the barkentine Gazella, a project I had been interested in years ago but gave up on for lack of plans, but plans have magically appeared now so the project is green lit again. Will I build all three simultaniously? Probably not a good idea but this is the road I am starting down and maybe by switching between projects I can maintain enthusiasm for all three by virtue of their individual differences.

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When younger, I would tend to 'yo-yo' back and forth between ornate early square riggers, and more elegant fore-and-afters. I guess it was the contrast, by the time I would finish a model, I would be sick of it, and want something different.

 

Nowadays, I tend to look for smaller but unusual (for me) types. Smaller because I am more aware of the time commitment required.

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I also think it's a good idea to pick kits (at least at the start) which help build certain skill sets.  For example, a copper plated ship model like Pickle or Phantom will teach you copper plating, a plank on frame kit like Duke William will teach plank on frame technique, a ship like Sultana or Bounty will teach carving figureheads or other decorations.  If your ultimate goal is to one day build something like Victory or Agamemnon better to line up your kits in order of various techniques you want to master along the way.  It's all relative though building a tug may not help with Victory but it may be fun regardless ;)

Edited by CharlieZardoz
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For me, I love the historical, educational aspect of the ships as much as the building of them, so my current plan is to build ships that will show the evolution of ships of the line over the centuries.  Ships that fit the bill are: Victory (1760's), Soleil Royal (1660's), Sovereign of the Seas (1630's), Revenge (1570's), Mary Rose (1510's), Henri Grace a Dieu or Great Harry (1510's).  A side benefit is that if I go in that progression I will moving from plastic kits to wood kits to wood scratch built.

 

Of course there is also the Constitution because.....well...you know.

 

Regards,

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I find that I need a personal connection to the prototype to really be motivated. For example, even though I'm fascinated by sailing ships, a number of my early models have been based on Missouri River craft because that's where I live and it's a favorite historic/geographic area for me.  While I don't like machinery overall and would place steamships in general pretty low in my list, these local craft have too much relevance for me to ignore. I built the Bounty Launch because I've been rereading those stories since high school; I also built a plastic Bounty for the same reason.

 

I find it too daunting to choose among all the possible ships out there, so finding that personal connection to something helps winnow the choices. I will never build all the ships I find attractive, and just have to come to terms with that.

 

I've also slowly looked for projects that will help improve my skills, without getting in over my head. While I'd love to build a large ship, my next two will likely be a longboat and a topsail schooner, to help develop skills in hulls and rigging, toward the someday goal of tackling a true ship. I will also likely squeeze in another steamboat.

 

Finally, I like being different, and finding my own path. Building riverboats certainly accomplishes that, and I hope to find a unique twist on any regular sailing craft I attempt, too.

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  • 2 weeks later...

For me it's about diversity - I don't think I've built the same type of ship twice, though this will come to an end soonish. I'm not really attracted to vessels past the 19th century (no offence to those who are!) though I've built a couple of working boats from the 20th (Corel Flattie and Brittany Sloop, Bluenose). Also, as others have said, it's really about what seems to me to look interesting or capture the imagination. I thought I would be more interested in specific historical subjects than I've turned out to be - for me, it's more about the aesthetics of different hull lines and rigs. It's all fun in any case and if someone gave me an Amati Titanic for Christmas it's not like I wouldn't build it!

hamilton

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