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Lighting the Work Area


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Apologies if this is covered elsewhere I did a brief search within this forum but didn't find anything.

 

I am looking at replacing my existing downlights with LEDs - I currently have 35 watt halogen globes (bulbs) fitted in the downlights giving off 465 lumens - I could upgrade the bulbs to 55 watt which will give off around 600 to 700 lumens. 

 

So I am seeking comments on the type of LEDs to fit in terms of brightness (lumens) and colour (kelvin) which would best suit scale modelling. The 35 watts halogens are absolutely useless and give off a very soft light which is not good for modelling.

 

I have attached some tables I gleaned form a website on different types of globes (bulbs)

 

 

 

 

 

 

kelvin.JPG

lumens.JPG

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https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.100w-equivalent-daylight-5000k-a19-led-light-bulb-2-pack.1001006062.html

 

your best bet is probably to go to a big  home store and choose  some kind of LED light bulb

Lumen and  image.png.2d76fc712c4610085f5bfc82b6b8fea9.pngare written on the box.

In this example 1500 lumens  and 5000K

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Another consideration you may want to factor in is where the completed model will be displayed.  Most homeowners, at least here in the States, tend to prefer warm white to white in their living spaces.  Institutions and other public spaces, probably more to the white/blue end.  There will be some difference in perceived paint color if mixed/applied under one end of the spectrum and displayed at the other - if you finish your models with paint.  Our model railroading cousins frequently come up against this issue when trying to match prototype paint colors.

 

My own preference for brightness level is "the more the better", particularly as I grow older.  Full sunlight is on the order of 125,000 lumens per square meter, which I find pretty harsh for prolonged work, but I've never been able to approach that level on my inside work surface even with swing-arm work lights.

 

Bill

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I just renovated my 18 x 20 workshop and redid the lighting. It's now far better than anything I previously had. 

I have 8 - 7w LED in a track configuration for general overhead illumination. Lights the room efficiently. Directly over my work areas, on a separate switch, I have 3 sets of 2- 32w 4100k fluorescent task lights.

tim

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Richmond,

 

I replaced the 4ft fluorescents in my work shop with these:

 

http://www.leevalley.com/en/Hardware/page.aspx?p=76395&cat=53&ap=1

 

I love them, 3800 lumens at 3000K.  Three are hooked up end to end,  solid 12ft run.  The rest are wired together so one wall switch turns them on or off.  They are a bit pricey,  but I don't think I'll ever have to replace them.

 

Also,  I bought them when they were first offered at $33.00 each.

 

Bob W

Edited by oneslim
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The electrician who wired my garage for 220V suggested that I replace my 4' fluorescent  drop lights with 4' LED units.  I did.  Twice as bright and lower electricity use.  I think I will place one over my inside bench, too.  They do not weigh very much, so the ceiling hooks need not be all that robust.

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If you have a smartphone, there are apps which can measure both the lumens and color temperature using the camera,  so you can get an idea of what your prefer for different tasks.

 

I found that I like color temperatures in the 4000k-5000k range, with 1500 lumens for general area lighting, and between 2000-4000 lumens for detailed work.  So over the bench, I have a strip LED and two architect task lamps that can be positioned as need.  Also, a whiteboard mounted on the wall can be used as a reflector and also to make notes.

 

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Personally I prefer a warm light in my workshop - as a hobby it should be a ’holistic’ relaxing activity and not production in an industrial setting. I know that some modellers, particularly the figure painters go to great lengths to create a day-light setting, but as noted above, in central and Northern Europe and North-America we tend to prefer warm light for our homes - in Southern Europe one sees more frequently ‚cold’ fluorescent bulbs and tubes in private homes.

For historic reasons I am still ‚mixed’, warm fluorescent and LEDs, but will switch over to the latter as when the former need to be replaced. 

I replaced the incandescent spots in my architects’ lamps with LED spots, but am not satisfied with the light distribution. Eventually I may go for large LED globes. I am also considering a large 60 x 120 cm LED panel above the work-table.

A rule of thumb seems to be to multiply the wattage of LEDs with 9 for cold and 8 for warm ones to estimate the equivalent incandescent bulb.

Edited by wefalck
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One consideration is top match the light you are modeling with, with the light you will be displaying your models with. While not as big a consideration with wood ships, if you paint your models, the colors may be off if the two types of light are different. This is an important point for model railroaders.

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I added new LED 4’ fixtures to my workroom.  Amazing difference!  My fluorescent was starting to go, and I noticed I was straining to see what I was working on.  Having good light is very important!

 

I tend to agree about having bright white light for a work area, versus softer whites for the rest of the house.  When playing with woods and finishes though, I like to bring them to a room with natural sunlight/softer white lights.

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