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G.L.

Day gaff sailing boat with center board by G.L. - FINISHED - scale 1/10 - SMALL

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Just finished catching up Geert, Some lovely work it is inspiring me to get back to my Buzzards Bay sailboat,  So many projects! so little time. Seeing the painted hull for some reason it shows off the form of the hull in a more soft way than seeing the planks, I like the colour as well.

 

Michael

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I’m continually amazed at your craftsmanship. I’m also amazed with how much I’m learning. Photos are very clear and helpful...Moab

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Great progress GL, you tackled reasonably big projects like mast tapering, sheave and cleat making and mast hardware with ease.

I am looking forward for the rest of the journey!

Is your rope bought or homemade?

 

Vaddoc

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On 1/4/2020 at 4:42 PM, michael mott said:

Just finished catching up Geert, Some lovely work it is inspiring me to get back to my Buzzards Bay sailboat,  So many projects! so little time. Seeing the painted hull for some reason it shows off the form of the hull in a more soft way than seeing the planks, I like the colour as well.

 

Michael

 

I am glad that I inspire you to continue your Buzzards Bay sailboat, Michael. It is one of your projects that I follow with much interest.

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On 1/4/2020 at 7:47 PM, Moab said:

I’m continually amazed at your craftsmanship. I’m also amazed with how much I’m learning. Photos are very clear and helpful...Moab

 

On 1/5/2020 at 6:38 AM, Peter Cane said:

Wow!!

Superbly executed!

 

 Thank you Moab and Pete

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On 1/4/2020 at 10:28 PM, vaddoc said:

Great progress GL, you tackled reasonably big projects like mast tapering, sheave and cleat making and mast hardware with ease.

I am looking forward for the rest of the journey!

Is your rope bought or homemade?

 

Vaddoc

Thank you Vaddoc,

The rope is homemade with DMC thread. My ropewalk is manual operated and vertical. It is very unpractical. I have to stand on a ladder to operate the handle. I am not really satisfied by it. I would like to make such one like you showed us in your Deben 5-tonner log in September. I was very pleased by the video that you posted then.530.thumb.JPG.7270af0d0937d5f10bffa257e844defb.JPG

 

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On 1/8/2020 at 9:03 PM, Jim Lad said:

Geert, I think an updated ropewalk is indicated! ;)

 

John

Yes John, I have the same thought.

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12.3 Rigging of the mast

12.3.1 Standing rig

The mast is supported by three stays: One to the stem and two to the chain plates at the sides.

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12.3.1 Running rig Top of the mast and gaff:

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12.3.2 Running rig main sheet.

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I am glad that two people have already said that they thought they were looking at the real thing.

That exact thought went through my mind but I did not want to make a fool of myself by asking.

This means you have fooled at least three people including me into having thought it was the real thing.

That is surely the whole point.

What a modeller!!!!

Pete

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Beautiful work G.L. -  and I echo the statements of others on the boats’ authentic appearance.  The model looks absolutely real.  Wonderful choice of woods and color tone.  Sweet work!
 

Gary

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On 1/12/2020 at 1:54 AM, michael mott said:

Hello Geert in looking at your gaff peak halliard if it were me i would spread the load a little wider like this

 

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I think that it would lessen the possibility of straining the gaff , Just my own thought.

 

Michael

Michael is correct, the plans for my Tammie Norrie show the span attached to the boom in similar positions to what Michael has drawn, the idea is that the gaff and sail are supported at the throat by the throat halyard and at even spacings along its length by the peak halyard via the span.

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On 1/11/2020 at 3:54 PM, michael mott said:

Hello Geert in looking at your gaff peak halliard if it were me i would spread the load a little wider like this

I think that it would lessen the possibility of straining the gaff , Just my own thought.

 

Michael

 

On 1/14/2020 at 12:35 AM, Bedford said:

Michael is correct, the plans for my Tammie Norrie show the span attached to the boom in similar positions to what Michael has drawn, the idea is that the gaff and sail are supported at the throat by the throat halyard and at even spacings along its length by the peak halyard via the span.

 

Hello Michael and Bedford, 

Thanks for your critical look at my model and for your useful hints.

Boatbuilding technically your remark is probably correct. I made my model accordingly to the drawings (see below).

The only thing that I can mention to my defense is that the boat is not designed to sail on open sea, but in sheltered waters like on a river or on a lake and probably only in nice weather. In such conditions the force on the gaff will not be so heavy.

 

 

IMG_20200116_0010_NEW.thumb.jpg.b41ba556c0f426cf7b1997435b2bed37.jpg

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On 1/11/2020 at 3:54 PM, vaddoc said:

Wonderful photos, makes you want to get in and set off! I very much like your choice of wood as well.

 

On 1/11/2020 at 4:00 PM, michael mott said:

The second photo looking forward in post #130 looks like the full size boat, superb modelwork!

 

On 1/11/2020 at 7:51 PM, KeithAug said:

I agree with Michael, is is hard to tell wether I am looking at a model or the real thing. Excellent workmanship GL.

 

On 1/11/2020 at 8:59 PM, Jim Lad said:

More excellent work - she looks superb.

 

John

 

On 1/12/2020 at 2:01 AM, Moab said:

I agree with the comments above.....everything is looking excellent.  I'm not an expert but your rope looks great...Moab

 

On 1/13/2020 at 10:01 PM, Peter Cane said:

I am glad that two people have already said that they thought they were looking at the real thing.

That exact thought went through my mind but I did not want to make a fool of myself by asking.

This means you have fooled at least three people including me into having thought it was the real thing.

That is surely the whole point.

What a modeller!!!!

Pete

 

On 1/14/2020 at 12:18 AM, FriedClams said:

Beautiful work G.L. -  and I echo the statements of others on the boats’ authentic appearance.  The model looks absolutely real.  Wonderful choice of woods and color tone.  Sweet work!
 

Gary

Vaddoc, Michael, Keith, John, Moab, Pete and Gary, your encouraging comments are much appreciated. It pleases me very much that you like my work.

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Geert

"The only thing that I can mention to my defense is that the boat is not designed to sail on open sea, but in sheltered waters like on a river or on a lake and probably only in nice weather. In such conditions the force on the gaff will not be so heavy."

Thanks for your explanation of why you made it the way you did.

 

The actual physics of the arrangement in the drawing would still put a much greater strain on the Gaff regardless of the weather conditions. Please I hope you don't misunderstand my intention It is my opinion the whoever drew that arrangement likely was not a seasoned sailor. That does not detract from the superb model that you have built.

 

Michael

 

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On 1/16/2020 at 10:27 PM, michael mott said:

Geert

"The only thing that I can mention to my defense is that the boat is not designed to sail on open sea, but in sheltered waters like on a river or on a lake and probably only in nice weather. In such conditions the force on the gaff will not be so heavy."

Thanks for your explanation of why you made it the way you did.

 

The actual physics of the arrangement in the drawing would still put a much greater strain on the Gaff regardless of the weather conditions. Please I hope you don't misunderstand my intention It is my opinion the whoever drew that arrangement likely was not a seasoned sailor. That does not detract from the superb model that you have built.

 

Michael

 

Hello, Michael,

I have not known Mr Van Beylen (the designer) personally, but you are probably right that he was not a seasoned sailor. He drew the boat as a modeler course. In any case I will take your remark with me to the monthly meeting with my local modeler friends next Saturday and look what their opinion is: stick to the original design of Mr Van Beylen or change the gaff and make a more seaworthy boat.

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13. The sails

I postponed it for as long as possible, but now I have to start to make sails. This model is already my second model waiting for sails. I will continue first with this gaff sail boat because the sails are less complicated than those for my Ostend shrimper. Nevertheless I will have learn operating my wife's sewing machine, so it will take some time and probably the progress of this log will slow down a bit. Anyway it will be more agreeable  to work in the warm kitchen than in my cold workshop in this winter time.

Today I made the paper patterns for the sails because this afternoon I will have the first lessons in stitching with the sewing machine by my wife.

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I have first learn to stitch long straight lines on a piece of cloth. When that works I cut the foresail accordingly to the pattern and I'm going to work with the sewing machine. For this run I have to concentrate fully on my work and did not make any pictures of the production process but when I make the main sail I will make it up to you.
This evening the fore sail is sewed. There is still a lot to do at it, but I cannot resist to attach it to the model with the help of some pins.

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Thank you to follow

Thank you for the likes

Thank you for the constructive comments

 

Till next week!

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Well, the peak halyard indeed does look a bit odd. Two ways of looking at it. Either you follow exactly what the designer had in mind, or you change the rigging to suit your needs. After all it is your boat and in real life I think during the initial fitting and much more during the life of the boat, many changes take place. I d say rig it as you like! 

 

I was looking again at your photos, I think the vividly grained wood works incredibly well at this scale! The boat is alive, the more boring woods like pear and boxwood would not achieve this I think. Lovely!

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