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US Brig Syren by Gahm - Model Shipways

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Thank you for your comments and all the "likes". They are highly welcome and appreciated!

 

- Floyd, your point is well taken! I checked again, but as I have followed Chuck's plans very carefully (inclusive the major dimensions of the belaying pins which look a bit different in the plans than what is provided in the kit) I think I am fine. The pins are as thin or even a little thinner than the kit-provided brass pins.

 

- Richard, I find the Proxxon lathe an affordable and very useful little tool! To get the presented results I tried all kinds of different approaches. I finally settled on using tooth picks (--> unlimited supply at nearly no cost, good stability, they already come as pretty thin dowels which makes the final processing easier, the birch? wood stains easily with Golden Oak). As the wood is a bit grainy regular cutters don't work very well - they split up the wood. However, needle files for the "rough" work and sanding sticks for the final smoothing of the surface work very nicely and lead to the shown results.

 

- Augie and Bob, thank you so much for your kind comments! As you know I am in awe of the combination of productivity and quality which is displayed in your builds! In my case I always tend to find the most time consuming approach to everything  :(. But then, as Russ is always stating in his comments: "It ain't a hobby if you are in a hurry"  :)

 

- Dirk, I guess I have to send you my order list as well, starting with all the fantastic rope work you are doing, and the wonderful details you are adding to your model  . . .  ;)

 

Thomas

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Nice looking pins Thomas!

 

For the record, a lathe, (wood or steal) is not really needed. I did the same trick with my Dremel clamped to my bench and then, as you describe, using needle files and sand paper.

 

Anything that can hold a pin of less then 2mm in diameter and spin it quick enough (at least some 1000rpm) will do.

 

I also tried tooth picks but found them to be too soft so I switched to pear or if it was apple instead in my Regina build.

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Why don't you and Dirk merge and have a joint venture supplying ship's parts.  I'll just order my whole next vessel from you and save a lot of angst.

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Thank you, Håkan! You are right, a Dremel probably will do the trick. Btw, I also started out with pear wood, but unfortunately its color turned out to be too dark for my model as it consists mostly of bass wood stained with Golden Oak. I made the same experience when I built the five rail - my pear wood version, although very nice looking, had too much contrast in comparison to the rest of the model. So I probably go back to bass wood. Boxwood on the other hand turned out to be too light . . . whereas the tooth pick wood (whatever it is  :)) stained just about right, was stable enough and was easily available. 

 

Great idea, Augie! With my productivity the venture would never get off the ground  :D! 

 

Thomas

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Thomas,

I will try files when I get to it.  I will use the lathe since I already have it and it will help me increase my skill for other tasks.

 

Thanks,

Richard

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After having finished about one third of my belaying pins I needed a little break and built the fife rail. The building process and the result is shown in images 1 – 5.

 

Thomas

 

 

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Image 1

 

 

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Image 2

 

 

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Image 3

 

 

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Image 4

 

 

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Image 5

 

 

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Great lathe work.  How do you go about 'repeating' the pieces?  They look very consistent, so do you use some sort of a transfer system to repeat the first one, or are you just really good at free hand work?

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Thank you so much for your comments and all the "likes"!

 

Dirk, thank you for your compliment. As always it is highly appreciated!

 

Augie, yes the rail will be pinned to the deck. I have already drilled the holes for the pins in the fife rail columns. But I will wait with this until I have the pump finished and can give the fife rail its final position without running into any surprises :) 

 

Brian, there is less to the lathe work than it appears. My "transfer system" consists of a piece of paper with the precise column profile on it so that I can compare the length dimensions of the part in the lathe with the target dimensions at any time, and I frequently measure the thickness of the part in several key locations. The rest is eye balling.

 

 Floyd, tough choices!!  :D

 

Thomas

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B.E. and Bob, thank you for your kind comments! Turning all those belaying pins gives me some good practice on the lathe ;)

 

Thomas

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Thank you, JesseLee, for stopping by and for your enthusiastic support. These were a lot of "likes"!  :)

 

Thomas

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Brian, there is less to the lathe work than it appears. My "transfer system" consists of a piece of paper with the precise column profile on it so that I can compare the length dimensions of the part in the lathe with the target dimensions at any time, and I frequently measure the thickness of the part in several key locations. The rest is eye balling.

 

 

Thomas

 

Guess that some times the simple way is the best way.  In this case your simple system appears to have fantastic results!  Thanks for the response - I hope to add a lathe to my workshop (after I actually get the workshop up and running) sometime in the future, and stuff like this makes me want it *now*, but I suppose I should have a place to actually put it first!

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Thank you for all the "likes".

And thank you, Bob, for your nice comment! At least finally the deck starts to fill up. It makes quite a difference in perception if there is something mounted on the deck  :)

 

Thomas

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A little update: during the last few weeks ship modeling time was very scarce. Between traveling (image 1  -  :) ) and multiple home projects I was able to finish all my belaying pins (image 2), and as a “reward” for having this highly repetitive work finally behind me I built the capstan.

 

My first attempt using mainly the parts provided in my Syren kit ended up about 1mm smaller in diameter than what was shown in Chuck’s plans (image 3). So I considered this a “prototype” and built a second one out of pear wood. Image 4, 5, and 6 show the building process. The drum head was constructed in the same way as described in the Syren instruction book. Of course, not having photo etched parts makes some things a bit more challenging (metal ring, image 4). The capstan foot I built in a slightly different way (image 6), using 2 slotted disks instead of individual tiny chocks. This also helped considerably with the chock alignment ;) . The finished result is shown in images 7 and 8.

 

Thomas

 

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Image 1

 

 

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Image 2 - All belaying pins are finished

 

 

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Image 3 - First capstan attempt

 

 

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Image 4 - 2nd capstan attempt: making of the drum head

 

 

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Image 5 - Making of the capstan foot

 

 

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Image 6 - Capstan foot continued

 

 

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Image 7 - Finished capstan

 

 

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Image 8 - Capstan mounted on Syren deck

 

 

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Beautiful work on the capstan Thomas. Earlier today I replied to your post on my log by asking when you would be working on Syren again. I guess that I've gotten the answer. :)  :)

 

Bob

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Thomas,

boy, following you is tricky business :-)

 

In image 3 B, what did you use to hold the capstan on the lathe?  It kind of looks like a Dremel bit holder.

 

Thanks Richard

Edited by rtropp

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Augie, Bob, Mike, and Richard, thank you so much for your kind comments! And thank you for all the "likes"!

 

- Augie, I guess the capstan may look familiar to you. I kind of borrowed the looks of the Confederacy capstan  ;)

- Bob, I am glad that you now and again remind me to publish something. Time flies so fast that I am always completely surprised when I notice that my last published contribution lies already several weeks back! 

- Mike, I can return the compliment: I absolutely enjoy watching your progress with your Mayflower model!

- Richard, yes, you are right. What I show in image 3b is a Dremel bit holder. It works fine on the lathe for small parts. I also tried it with a turn table and my mill. Here the cutter unscrewed the bit holder and I ended up with yet another "prototype" :D.

 

Thomas

Edited by Gahm

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