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  • 2 weeks later...

Pics! Pics! Pics! Pics!

 

How did you end up doing your lower dead eyes? I remember having a tough time with those. ...tying the knots in the right place after running the line thru the hole in the hull was difficult. I think what I ended up doing was determine where the know should be. Tie it BEFORE putting it through the hole, making it about the same size as the hole. When I pulled the knot thru the hole, it was hard, but with a little effort I pulled it through and it was not going back.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Lol. I caught the boat and basically I grabbed the catheads. I received the replacements today. I will prep them but not install the yet.. I tried to blacken the cleats, but apparently wrong metal to do that. In Kurt's last installment, he airbrushed them. Chuck. will I ever finish this thing? (kidding. Having loads of fun)!!!

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Small, yeah. One problem with cleats is/are that unlike some pieces of the model, they may have to take a strain....and will pop out. For Philly 1 I used some brass cleats from Blue Jacket. They are flat, but in that scale you don't notice. Also, they have a longer stem so they sink into the wood further. I used a glue, can't recall the name but I will get it. It is not quite an epoxy, but stronger than regular wood glue.

 

For Philly 2 I am thinking of using some of Chuck P's wood cleats. The plan is to drill a small hole down the center and use a small dowel to give it more depth. I usually use bamboo, because you can get it real small and it is still strong. I turn it down with my dremel and sand paper.

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We had two great models of the Philadelphia entered at the Manitowoc contest last week.  Both took Gold medals and one took the Best of Show award!  Before anybody makes their fireplace cook stove read my article - Part 7 - the concluding article on this model, about how I made bricks for the fireplace and how the Best of Show model maker did his.  I would do it his way if I were to do it again, but don't use the wooden bricks from the kit - make real bricks.

 

I have attached 2 photos of the fireplace.  The first one is mine.  I worked at making it look like it wasn't done by a bricklayer, figuring that the builders of the Philadelphia didn't include brick layers.  The other is made by Sam Parent from Winona, MN who won the best of show award.  He also made a lot of cooking gear as well as a lot of the stuff needed to load and fire the guns.  Excellent work.  Sam's is more closely that of a brick mason's work.  Photo of Sam's fireplace is by him.

 

We both made representations of fires in the fireplaces.

 

Kurt

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I have attached another photo of Sam Parent's Philadelphia for you guys to drool over.  The details he has added are plentiful and truly make this a remarkable model. 

Sam is new to the NRG, I signed him up at the contest, and I am going to ask him to join in here.  I gave a spiel at the modeler's symposium there about MSW and the NRG and I think we probably already have some new lurkers at MSW from there.  Maybe he will share more photos with us.

Photo by Sam Parent.

Kurt

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Edited by kurtvd19
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In answer to Joel Sanborn's query.  When the Smithsonian first acquired the Philadelphia, that was the location that they speculated the hearth would have been.  Later, after the curator (Howard P. Hoffman) did the complete survey, it was discovered that there were char marks on the under side of the mast partner on the port side of the forward cockpit, placing the original hearth in that spot rather then amidships.  Hoffman did a very detailed set of plans based on the survey (16 pages to be exact) that can be obtained from the Smithsonian (at nominal cost!) that shows wonderful details of the hearth among other things.  It was well worth the price as it was invaluable for my model's detail work.  Sam P.

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