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Glue to use for gluing cut sheets to wood.

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What would be a good glue to use for gluing printed plans on wood to be cut?  I'm thinking rubber cement but not sure.

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For individual parts, I have just used Elmers Glue Stick. But it might not be practical for a large area.

Just another thought, why wouldn't plane old flour and water work?

Or wouldn't the white paste we would use in school work?

RussR

Edited by RussR
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There are spray adhesives similar to rubber cement that work great.  Elmer's makes one - Hobby Lobby, Michael's, and art stores have it.  Any water based glue or such will distort the paper.  This has been discussed at length here - a search might yield specifics.

Kurt

 

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Mark, initially I used the 3M spray glue, both the repositioning and permanent. Very expensive, messy and not too good. I then tried the ordinary children stick glue (Pritt this side of the pond) and haven't looked back. The paper can be peeled off or gently scraped off later. It is water soluble but does not penetrate the wood at all. If water is used to remove the paper it may need very light sanding to remove the sticky glue residue. I never had problems with distortion but indeed too much glue will wet the paper. Not needed as it is very strong.

One of the advantages is that the paper sticks well. With the sprays, the edges were lifting when scroll sawing with dust getting underneath and the paper would half come off

I bought three sticks for £2 last week!

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I still prefer to print (or make a copy) onto full sheet size (8.5X11) label paper and then cut out the individual parts on the paper,  peel off the backing and apply it to the wood.  No stretching or distortion and easy to scrape and sand the paper off the wood once the piece is done.   Avery brand is good by pricey.  Store brand from Staples in the US is much less expensive. 

Allan

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What works for me is a good quality rubber cement - Best Test is what I prefer.  The trick is to use a very liberal and full coverage coat on both surfaces.

Let it dry a bit and then stick.  this method does not favor further adjustment, so a careful aim is needed. The solvent is volatile and the cement can get

too thick, so I have a quart of the solvent Bestine (n-hepane) and use a pipette to add small volumes to keep the cement at the correct viscosity. 

I work from a 120ml applicator cap bottle, but buy it in quarts.

I cut out the frame timbers for USS Vincennes in 2015 and the patterns are still stuck fast to the pieces - waiting for assembly into frames.

Edited by Jaager

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Thanks for all the recommendations.  I like Allan's idea and if I have cut anything bigger than I can laser, I'll give that try.  I ended up with a small can of "Spray Mount" from Scotch brand after speaking with the sale person at the local office supply house.  It's holding fine and when I'm done, a bit acetone should clean the wood up nicely for gluing bulkheads, etc.   I think this is the only time I'll have to use it as I can laser the bulkheads (whew!) as I'm not the best scroll saw operator.

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I have been using glue-sticks (Pritt, Uhu, etc.) on wood, metal and acrylics. Good for small parts, as the application is not messy.

 

Photo mounting spray cement and similar have to be used in well-ventilated rooms and you have to protect the work surface from over-spray. Not really worth the effort, if you deal with drawings smaller than say A5.

 

For larger drawings, the glue-stick dries too fast and you would have to apply it in stages, which may lead to distortions. Here, the mounting spray may be better.

 

One should have a flat-bed ink-jet printer with a height-adjustable nozzle to be able to print directly onto the wood etc. of different thickness ... ;)  ... thinking about this, if you have a suitably sized, but weak laser-engraver, you can burn the lines and then cut the piece out with the scroll- or band-saw.

Edited by wefalck

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