Julie Mo

Miniature Hand Tools

71 posts in this topic

Julie I am not sure where the idea to use glass came from. At the time I was completely enraptured by a chap called James Krenov, I love the line in his book Called "A Cabinetmaker's Notebook"

 

"My way of working is just a long series of personal discoveries. I can't give anyone secrets, something that I promise
will work, because, finally, it depends upon one's skill and intuition, and other things. But I can give hints, the benefit
of some experience in the things that have happened to me. I don't get kiln-dried wood because I think that kiln-dried
wood has been killed. This is not a pun, but a fact. The process of saturating wood with steam and getting it all wet, cooking
it, you might say, is a chemical process that changes and dulls the color of the wood, and the fibers are affected so that wood
which has been kiln-dried feels different to me. It's got a different ring, a different texture; it isn't clear and fine. It's like
a poorly developed photograph-one that was taken well but just didn't come out. Besides, kiln-dried wood is brittle."

 

The bit about personal discoveries is so true, in any field of endevour we come across gems that are true for us, these things just happen at the right time, the key is realizing it.

 

This working with wood gig is just such a fantastic journey, I use wood to heat my shop and as I split the wood every now and then a piece of birch (air dried) or spruce or pine just splits in such a way that I have to put it to one side to use for something other than warming my body, more for using it to warm my soul.

 

Michael
 

probablynot, PeteB, Canute and 8 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, now I feel it is a right place to ask :)
I have a Veritas low angle block plane, and looking for something to flatten small boards.

There are two options:

1) buy an optional tote and a knob for the block plane (such thing exists! See http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=41715&cat=1,41182,48942 )

2) Buy a veritas low angle jack plane and an additional 38 degree blade (for smoothing). Keep in mind it is a bevel up blade, so angles sum up.

 

Second option is quite expensive though..

Block plane path is cheaper, but it only has 25deg blade. I can do scraping for smoothing, though.
Ok the other hand, my boards are typically as long as the jack plane, or even shorter - so the jack could be be too large for my purposes. But could be used for jointing due to its length... So far using a block plane and a shooting board for jointing.

Would appreciate some thoughts from a more experienced craftsman here!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, now I feel it is a right place to ask :)

I have a Veritas low angle block plane, and looking for something to flatten small boards.

There are two options:

1) buy an optional tote and a knob for the block plane (such thing exists! See http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=41715&cat=1,41182,48942 )

2) Buy a veritas low angle jack plane and an additional 38 degree blade (for smoothing). Keep in mind it is a bevel up blade, so angles sum up.

 

Second option is quite expensive though..

 

Block plane path is cheaper, but it only has 25deg blade. I can do scraping for smoothing, though.

Ok the other hand, my boards are typically as long as the jack plane, or even shorter - so the jack could be be too large for my purposes. But could be used for jointing due to its length... So far using a block plane and a shooting board for jointing.

 

Would appreciate some thoughts from a more experienced craftsman here!

 

Why are those the only two options? There are three sizes of smoothing plane between your block and the jack that make great jointer planes for model stock. Look at my build log, you see me using my bevel up smoothing plane to thickness cocobolo easily.

 

Ah heck here is the photo. This is my highly technical setup - a piece of 1/8 scrap (I can use 1/16", did last night) as a stop, two cam clamps, and my BU smoothing plane. It works great if you can plane parallel to your surface, and I have no issues controlling size down to .001".

 

post-9338-0-23033000-1485295388_thumb.jpg

 

As for which blade, you're right that the important thing is what is the final cutting edge angle of incidence to the wood (bed angle plus bevel angle for BU planes), and working with model hardwoods that should be close to the proverbial York pitch of 50 degrees. Higher for figured woods.

 

The reason I like the new BU planes is one smaller/lower profile that makes them handier, and two I just think it makes more sense to have most of the mass and blade axis with the highest strength aligned close to the cut. These planes sharpened never chatter on anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I am not only using it on a model scale, it is mostly intended for something between real woodworking and model scale.

This photo should give an idea, block plane for scale. 

post-5430-0-87317800-1485296029_thumb.jpg

 

There are two choices because I already have a block plane, and buying something similarly sized is not reasonable. So jack plane that can also be good for jointing the boards along the grain (cross grain low angle block plane is good and big enough). On the other end, I have no troubles jointing it with block plane and a straight edge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I wouldn't call block and smoothing plane similar-sized, standard block, smooth, jack, and jointer are all distinct sizes that perform specific functions relative to each other. I mean I'm not sure I'd recommend buying the small smoothing plane but the large one I have is an altogether different animal from your block plane.

 

But your mileage may vary and it's up to you what you get. My concern is that the jack is too big, but certainly block is much too small to flatten boards that long/wide so no I wouldn't recommend getting the handle for your block plane at all. That would make you use that plane in that mode a bit better but it doesn't change the fundamental size and you need more size.

 

The reason I'm also against jack is that board is about the smallest that's appropriate for a jack plane, so you pay lots of money for something that applies to only one process.If you know you're going to be doing bigger work more often maybe it works out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike, before reading vossiewulf's reply, the first plane that came to mind for me is the smoothing plane.  I agree with is comments 100%.  I have used mine for jointing the sides of planks I ripped on the table saw.  And for finish work, it is the best choice.

 

The #62 low angle jack plane however, can be a great all around plane if you equip it with extra plane irons.  I especially love the adjustable throat on mine.  It really helps control the cut. 

 

FWW did an article some time ago about the #62 calling it the only hand plane you need.  In the article, the author recommended having one iron sharpened at 280 and one at 350.  Add the 120 already in the plane bed and you can tackle more jobs.  He also recommended a toothed iron to take the place of a scrub plane and a scraper blade to round out the collection.  You can see how versatile the #62 can be if you do this.  It was the first "real" plane I bought and with it bought the additional irons.  

 

Over time, I added to my plane collection and while I don't use the #62 for everything any more, it is the plane I still use most often for general woodworking.  But it's not one I would think of going to for model making.  The first one I pulled out when I wanted to joint the edges of planks was the smoothing plane, FWIW. 

biltut, druxey, thibaultron and 3 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Above somewhere I was talking about the need to slightly curve the edges of straight plane irons to feather the edges of the cuts and avoid those nasty hard lines made by sharp plane iron corners. I was sharpening my little Lie-Nielsen squirrel-tail plane, the flat-bottomed one that matches Julie's convex one, and remembered to take a pic to demonstrate.

 

Some people try to make it a smooth curve all the way across, this is senseless to me as no matter what you do that will leave a scalloped surface. Instead I leave as much of the iron as possible straight, and then only smoothly relieve the corners, because unlike the continuous-curve iron, mine leaves a perfectly flat surface. As to how flat, go look at the piece of wenge I planed, pic on page 3 of this thread.

 

Since this iron is only 1" wide it doesn't have as much of a flat in the center, but you can still see what I mean. By the way, I'm with Ron Hock and don't do secondary bevels despite what it looks like here. Somehow the last time I sharpened this it was more like 23.5 degrees instead of the desired 25 degrees, so I'm fixing that, another couple of sharpenings and it will be all one bevel again. And this was sharpened 1000-4000-8000 Shapton stones and finally on a strop. The dark spots on the right part of the cutting edge that look kind of like flaws aren't, they're reflections of things on my bench above,

 

post-9338-0-06636600-1486605935_thumb.jpg

 

The best way to do this curved edge is with the Mk.II Veritas Honing Guide with the curved barrel-shaped roller that is designed to do exactly this process. It's technically feasible to do it by hand, but it certainly ain't easy.

Julie Mo, Mike Y, mtaylor and 4 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had the Veritas micro chisels for over a month now and wanted to update my previous email. I love using these chisels. I am working on masting for my Eagle and find these are the go to tool when making small cuts and bevels on the masts. They also work well in getting into tight corners to remove squeeze out.

 

I also have to mention that the stereozoom microscope I purchased off eBay is also coming in very handy. While it is a large tool, it is sort of tertiary to this discussion since it allows one to see really small areas. A good example of how both of these tools came handy is when I was making the top mast platform. After I cleaned up all the squeeze out using my flip down magnifiers, I decided to see how mush left over I could see with the microscope. It was a huge amount. However, with the small chisels I was able to clean out all of this squeeze out cleanly. You ask if it made any difference since it was so small to begin with? I think so. Cumulatively, this type of squeeze out removes some of the sharp corners that while they might not be evident, once they were all done, did make the stop seem much crisper.

 

Anyway, that is my story and I am sticking to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just catching up with this thread. There is no substitute for a quality tool. I smiled at Michael's reference to James Krenov. A wonderful designer/craftsman. For gnarly woods, a cabinet scraper is a useful alternative to shards of glass, and perhaps a little safer as well!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.