Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This is probably so clear to most builders, but I'm a little 'stumped' on this :huh: :

 

I'm trying to figure out where the great cabin would be on this ship, and the proper names for these decks.

 

In the second photo attachment, deck 1 is the main deck, 2 is the half deck?, 3 is the quarter deck? and 4 is the poop deck? It was easy on my Mayflower since there was one less deck. :P

 

I thought just below deck 4 might be the location for the great cabin, but there are no doors or windows at the stern for that deck...possible chart room?

 

Just below deck 3 there are elaborate doors and windows at the stern and side for that level....possible great cabin?

 

Any help appreciated...I'll also post this question in Building, Framing, Planking etc. section.

 

post-167-0-24106000-1369958151.jpg

 

post-167-0-46735900-1369958153_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Sherry

 

If I understand the layout of the HMS Victory, the Great Cabin ( or Captain's Cabin) was located at the end of the main gun deck and above the officer's cabin.

 

If the San Felipe is similar, that would put the Great Cabin as the one with the balcony and the officer's cabin would have the covered balcony.

 

This is my guess....

 

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Sherry

 

Well the replies are just pouring in! LOL I thought you would have had more of a response than this?

 

What are your thoughts on the Great Cabin? 

 

I'm surprised how quiet it has been lately....no popcorn, coffee or ratline comments? What's going on? Did Europe get swallowed up by a giant Kraken?

 

I'm hobbled right now after surgery to my toe....love the Tylenol #3s though....smooth like a fine wine! :)

 

Cheers

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Sherry,

 

I agree with Steve, the captain's cabin should be the one with the open balcony so he and his sweetie can sit there in their rocking chairs and sip mint juleps and munch popcorn  :rolleyes:

 

Ref the deck colors, please don't make too dark, even honey maple can make it too dark for decks.  I like to see some contrast too and with the walnut for the hull planking that should look great.

 

Cheers,

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting discussion... I would have thought it was the other way around..  The lower one would be the Great Cabin, used by the Captian when no admiral was on board.  The upper would then be used by the Captain when there was an admiral on board.  But I could be wrong.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting discussion... I would have thought it was the other way around..  The lower one would be the Great Cabin, used by the Captian when no admiral was on board.  The upper would then be used by the Captain when there was an admiral on board.  But I could be wrong.

So when the cat is away all the mice move up?  Something about that doesn't sound quite right.  Might have depended on who was Admiral.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Sherry,

 

The deck marked #4 is over what was called the Poop Royale. This was used on French and Spanish ships as accommodation for the ships Pilots and Sailing Masters. On English ships it was known as the Topgallant Poop and was originally where the Ships Trumpeters lived. 

 

Dave :dancetl6:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank-you everyone for the responses! It's really appreciated!

 

Steve: My guess was that the great cabin was under #3 too, but I wasn't sure. It seems that everyone, basically, is in agreement.

Well the replies are just pouring in!

LOL. Suddenly I did receive some responses - I think you started something!

 

Robbyn: I know what you mean about summer - too many jobs and not enough time, especially for model building!!! :(

 

Piet: I agree with Steve...LOL.
I agree with you on keeping the deck light. The thing is, I had birch veneer on hand which is very, very light in colour. I still had some deck planks left from my Mayflower kit and compared - the birch looks almost white in comparison. I only used one coat of honey maple and didn't wait long to wipe it off. I'm quite happy with the result. I like the contrast too and can't wait to put the walnut planking on her.

 

Mark: Interesting thought...I'm sure any Captain, back in the day, would have liked your idea as well! ;)

 

Augie: First I have to say that I've noticed that the wives here on MSW are referred to as "The Admiral". (No worries...I think it's quite funny) :P 
That being said, your comment: "Might have depended on who was Admiral" made me chuckle. It would stand to reason, by MSW standards, that I am the Admiral, and in my case the captain shares my quarters (or should that be 1st mate)! This 'cat' let the mouse move up, and in, a long, long time ago! :P  :D  :D

 

Kevin: Oooops! Thanks for the thought anyway!

 

Ronald: I'm probably not the best person to ask about model tools. I have a tendency to do a lot of work by hand. We have a fully stocked workshop, but they are full sized power tools and most are not too practical for small scale work. I did buy a scroll saw and think that is a must. If I was to buy another tool now, it would be a hobby size table saw. I do have a dremmel and think that will be handy later on for carving etc.

 

Dave: Thanks...didn't know that. Learn something new all the time here. :)

 

Nigel: Another vote for #3 being the great cabin - thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

:D  :D  :D  'Tis your ship, Admiral so you decide who goes where.

 

In my case, the wife is the local Base Commander.  We had sailboats for years and she was only happy when the engine was running.  Came to the point where I had to play a tape recording of the engine to keep her calm in heavy weather :) .  A sailor she aint !

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Hey Ronald

 

Do you intend to make the planking or buy it? I recommend buying the planking.

 

1. Scroll Saw

2. Dremel with foot  pedal speed control and flexible head

3. Portable Drill (cordless or not) for tapering and rounding masts and yards

4. Plank bender

 

That is all I can think of, at least that is all I use.

 

Cheers

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ronald,

 

You may get more answers if you post your question in a general discussion area rather than in someone's build log. I would suggest posting it here:

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/forum/18-modeling-tools-and-workshop-equipment/

 

You are likely to get a wide range of answers though, as what you are asking is a bit like asking "how long is a piece of string?" The answers could range from, you don't actually need any power tools at all, to as many as your budget will allow. Some folks do some marvellous work with almost exclusively hand tools, except for maybe a Dremel type drill. Others, like me, are power tool junkies - I've never met a power tool I didn't like!

 

If you dig around a bit in the link above, you may find some more answers to your question. You might also want to have a look through some of the scratch build logs to see what tools these modellers are using. Have a look at Victory by EdT; Naiad by EdT; Vulture by Dan Vad, Kingfisher by Remco, and Atlanta by tlevine, to name just a few exceptional scratch builds. There are many, many more.

 

I hope this helps.

Link to post
Share on other sites

runner63: Thank-you!

 

Ronald: I think Steve had some good suggestions. My first ship was a kit build and I only used hand tools for that.

Since this is a scratch build I am using more power tools, but still make use of a lot of hand ones and I can only give advice on that with which I am familiar.

 

What I have used so far and will use in the future:

 

  • Scroll saw  - especially for cutting keel and bulkheads or frames.
  • Drill and/or Dremel - can be used as a lathe and is great for masts, yards, stanchions, belaying pins and maybe even wooden canons!
  • Table saw (milling some of my own wood)
  • Iron for plank bending 

I would love to have a micro table saw...maybe in the future.  I hope this helps. :)

 

Steve and Grant: Thanks for your suggestions and input!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not much change since the last the last pictures I posted, but there has been a little progress.

The half deck is planked...the fore and poop decks are just loosely sitting in place, but not glued. The inner bulwarks (?) are planked with walnut.

 

I am thinking about measuring and cutting the gun ports before the second planking...the thought of waiting to do it after the second planking has me nervous. Any tips, pointers, advice before I venture into that realm?

 

post-167-0-84600300-1371508856_thumb.jpg

 

post-167-0-09711600-1371508854_thumb.jpg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sherry:

Your model looks great.

 

I think that marking and cutting the gunports first would be a good idea. Then you can plank around them with your second layer of planking and not risk damaging the second layer later on by cutting into it. I have not had to do this sort of operation before, but it makes sense inside my head, if nothing else. :)

 

Russ

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Sherry

 

Glad to see you posting again...I thought your garden had swallowed you up!

 

I would agree with Russ that the time to cut out your portholes is before the final planking on the exterior.

 

That would follow the process that I am using with HMS Serapis.

 

I would also double check the template that I sent to your plans and see if they are the same scale. If they are, you should be able to use the template, if not, you may need to sketch new  port hole locations on the template but to me, that template should be the way to go...it should be the way to go.

 

Cheers

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sherry the ship is looking very fine I would agree with Russ if I were going to cut holes for cannons then I would do it before the second planking it will allow you the added ability to ensure that the finished holes are clean and accurate and square, I say this not because I think that you are not capable of making them clean and square in the first place, it is just an insurance policy. And I like to have a fall back position. wood sometimes does not behave itself.

 

Michael

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Sherry, :dancetl6:

Some very good progress indeed.

I fully agree with Mark - The use of a cannon, will help a lot; especially when finishing the aperture to the correct size and height.

For example, I always keep a figure handy, so that when dimensions on both the scale plans and books don't make sense, I double check.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...