Jump to content

USCG Pequot (WARC-58) by Cap'n'Bob - 1:96 - Finished


Recommended Posts

Hello MSW,

 

It took quite a while but I finally decided on the boat to build.  I have a too long list and will probably not come close to building them all.  As I have said before I live in a small house without room to to display large boats.  The options are build small boats or build in small scale.  This time I chose small scale at 1:200 and cross my fingers that I do it justice.

 

The US Coast Guard Pequot (WARC-58). 

 

During WWII this cable ship laid top secret Indicator Loop cables to protect harbors from German U-boats. Her mission ranged from the ports of Virginia up to Argentia, Newfoundland.

 

The Pequot was built in 1909 by the New York Shipbuilding Company in Camden, New Jersey with the name General Samuel M. Mills and first commissioned as an Army mine layer. As a twin screw ship she was able to conduct the critical maneuvering required for precise cable laying operations. The Pequot had a length of 166' and a beam of 32'. With a draft of 13' she displaced 1106 tons. During wartime the crew consisted of 6 officers and 63 enlisted men. The ship was armed with two 20mm automatic fire cannons. On top of the rear cabin her signal letters and radio call sign, NRFQ, was painted so aircraft could raise the ship on the radio. The Pequot's official visual call sign as designated by the Chief of Naval Operations was W58.

 

Pequot was named after an Indian tribe resident in Southern Connecticut, members of the Algonquian language grouping.

 

From the information and pictures I‘ve been able to able to find the Pequot and her sisters were of riveted steel for the hull and maim deck housing.  Above that she was wood. So it look like I’ll be re-studying the build style of MSW member Nils (Mirabell61).

 

Bob

 

As the General Samuel M. Mills

post-513-0-53752200-1446154556_thumb.jpg

 

As the Pequot

post-513-0-90853800-1446154566.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by Cap'n'Bob
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome, Ben, Mike and Dave.  I constantly scan the web, using different phrases, looking for interesting boats.  When I see something on Google images  I go to their home page to see what they have.  Sometimes it's good and sometimes not.  For those interested in the Pequot check out this website.

 

http://indicatorloops.com/usn_pequot_plans.htm

 

Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob,

 

I just took another look at the plans and views you are going to base your  new Pequot model on (General Mills).

It really is a good choise, and congrats, you have great luck to have detected these fab. supporting documents with your web research (pics and drawings). Trust there will be all you need for a wonderful model.

The scale 1:200 is quite an ambitious one, but your need for smaller models at limited space is well understood

 

Nils

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob Looks very interesting, that is a lot of detail at 1:200 basically the engineering scale for 1/16th. the website that you linked to is a great wealth of information for your model, if only every boat and ship we wanted to build had such great detailed first pages.

 

michael

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nils, Michael, Pete,  welcome to you all.  1:200 is smaller then I have worked before but I won't know unless I try.  Nils at first I wanted to wrap the hull in foil with the rivets, like you do, but I think the scale is too small.  As Michael said 1/16" = 12" or 1" = .005" (.127mm)  As for detail we will all, me too, have to wait and see what these old fingers can still do.  Lets see, a 6" block is 1/32" (0.8mm) .  What line do you use to strop a block that small?  Do I have this right, if I see the real boat at a distance of 50 feet, at this scale it is the equivalent of 10,000 feet or nearly 2 miles (3k)?  Thinking like that, I would take a thin stick, paint it a pale fuzzy gray and say that's it 2 miles away.  No, I can't think like that, people will be seeing it from 1 to 3 feet ah well it will be an interesting build.

 

Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see that at least three of you agree that 1:96 is the way to go.  So now to start.  I traced the lines in AutoCad and developed the bulkheads and keel.  Then I used the scroll saw and belt sander to create lots of sawdust.  What was left is pictured below.  Her lines are better than I had expected all 20.75” inches of her.  And now it’s on to planking.

 

Bob

 

post-513-0-64439600-1446915333_thumb.jpg

 

post-513-0-55365800-1446915342_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...