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Skipjack Kathryn by Mahuna - FINISHED - 1:32 - Based on HAER Drawings

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8 hours ago, Omega1234 said:

Hi Frank

 

It’s great that you’re back on deck and able to get some work done on Kathryn. 

 

Superb work, as always.

 

All the best.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

Hi Patrick - great to hear from you.  Yeah, it's really good that life has got back to being somewhat 'normal'.

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Frank,

It's very good to see you back in action. Sounds like your wife is taking all that crap in stride. Good for her.

 

I'm in the middle of moving. Next stop setting up the new shop.

 

My love to your wife.

 

Rich:champagne:

 

 

 

 

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23 hours ago, PETERPETER said:

Very pleased to see that you have passed through the most difficult part of your recent event and good to see you back to work on Kathryn. 

I note that you have not pencil lined the sail to represent seamed cloth panels. Possibly the sail was not made up from seamed panels??? You have also shortened the height of the sail, (with fewer hoops) so that the furled and tied appearance will be visually to scale. Your wire shrouds and stays, using Surfstrand fishing leaders add realistic detail to your Kathryn. All around superb work.

 

Hi Peter.  Thanks for checking in.  Kathryn's sails, like all others, are in fact made from panels, but I decided not to show the seams because I'd be furling the sails and didn't think the seams would be necessary on the model.

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8 hours ago, michael mott said:

The model is looking good Frank. One thing you might experiment with for the crimping of the cables is to use some heat shrink tubing and give it a shot of silver paint. I found it worked very well on the cables on my Cutter.

 

Michael

Thanks Michael.  I hadn't thought of using the heat shrink tubing, but it's probably worth a try.  Thanks for the suggestion, and I'll try it out in the future.  For now, since I have the crimping beads and don't have appropriate shrink tubing, I'll proceed as planed.

 

8 hours ago, Kurt Johnson said:

Frank,

 

Nice to see your work again.

 

Kurt

 

 

Thanks Kurt.  Hopefully things will proceed from here - we're pretty much on the home stretch with Kathryn.

 

1 hour ago, HIPEXEC said:

Frank,

It's very good to see you back in action. 

 

I'm in the middle of moving. Next stop setting up the new shop.

 

Rich:champagne:

 

Hi Rich.  Thanks, and good luck with your move.  Looking forward to seeing your new shop one of these days.

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Part 85 –Furling the Mainsail

 

Kathryn’s main sail is kept furled during the entire oyster season, since she only goes out for dredging under power.  

 

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As covered in a previous post, silkspan was used for Kathryn’s sails. Since furling the sails on the model would be a once-only effort with little opportunity for ‘do-overs’ I constructed a jig with sails for practicing the furling.  I’m glad I did, because I tried a number of times (ironing the creases out of the sails after each aborted attempt) before I felt comfortable enough to attempt it on the model.

 

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I found that the folds in the sail tended to loosen as I moved up the sail for subsequent folds, making the furled sails very loose and not very authentic.  In trying to control this, I made some flat bars that would help me keep the folds of the sail somewhat consistent.

 

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The ‘jaws’ on the end of the slats would fit around the mast to keep the slats from twisting too much.

 

The completed folds of the sail were held in place by some plastic clamps with a very weak holding power.

 

                        1056.thumb.jpg.848a62efb288a6f33daece30e47665ea.jpg

 

This process worked for the first few folds, but the use of the slats and clamps became too unwieldy for the subsequent folds, so I stopped using them as I worked to the top of the sail.  By then, however, there was a decent base for the rest of the folds.

 

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The mast hoops on the real Kathryn have enough weight for them to lie in a stack, but the hoops on the model are so light that they would not lie naturally by themselves.  I applied some PVA between each hoop, and held the stack in place with a clamp until dry.

 

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The line that was wrapped around the furled sail was secured in place by some diluted white glue at each of the knots.

 

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Before doing any of the rigging on the main mast, I decided to prepare and install the wire cables for the shrouds.

 

The short length of the shrouds that wrap around the mast are served with marlin line to protect the mast from chafing by the wire.  Using a bench vise and a fly tying vise to stretch the wire, I served the wire by hand using some very thin 007” thread which would simulate ¼” marlin.  CA was applied at each end of the serving to keep from unwrapping.  The alligator clips holding the loose ends of the thread  kept everything tight until the glue was set.

 

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The shrouds were then wrapped around the mast at the hounds and crimping tubes were used to join the two sides of each shroud.

 

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The jib stay was already installed on the model but needs to hang loose until the jib is installed.  I took the opportunity to serve the jib stay, and had to position the model close to the vise setup to accomplish that.

 

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The shrouds will be left loose until most of the rigging is completed.

 

Next task will be to rig the main halyard and the boom lift.

 

Thanks all!

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11 hours ago, Omega1234 said:

Hi Frank

 

Top job on furling the mainsail.  Nice and neat, as is typical of all of your work.

 

Thanks

 

Patrick

Thanks, Patrick.  It took a while to get it done, but I'm satisfied with the result.

 

10 hours ago, GuntherMT said:

Fantastic looking furled mainsail Frank!  I really like how it came out.

Thanks, Brian.  The jib is going to be a challenge.

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Excellent work as expected each time you add to your log. Nearing the end of your Kathryn build! Recall that I have a large sheet of Perspex/Plexiglass you should look at when you get around to building the display case... or might you be thinking to use glass?  I'll bring you my jib sail so you can see how I fashioned the shackles and stitched them to the sail. Use of grommets at this scale would be difficult to say the least.

Best regards,

Peter

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11 hours ago, PETERPETER said:

Excellent work as expected each time you add to your log. Nearing the end of your Kathryn build! Recall that I have a large sheet of Perspex/Plexiglass you should look at when you get around to building the display case... or might you be thinking to use glass?  I'll bring you my jib sail so you can see how I fashioned the shackles and stitched them to the sail. Use of grommets at this scale would be difficult to say the least.

Best regards,

Peter

Hi Peter.  I haven't even thought about a display case yet.  Would love to see the jib you've made.  

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Part 86 –Boom Lift and Main Halyard

 

Time in the shop has been hard to find of late – lots of chores that need to be done.

 

In trying to plan out the Boom Lift and the Main Halyard, I found a good article on the tackles that are typically found on ships, and I heartily recommend it for those modelers (like me) that have questions about rigging the various blocks used on ships:

 

http://www.tpub.com/steelworker2/59.htm

 

The Main Halyard is actually a fairly simple arrangement.  A triple block is supported by a ringbolt set into the Main Mast just below the Masthead Band.

 

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A double block with a two beckets is attached to the head of the Mainsail via the lower becket.  The Main Halyard is seized to the upper becket of this block and is then reeved through the triple and double blocks.

 

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The Main Halyard is then tied off to the starboard mast cleat.

 

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The upper part of the Boom Lift is comprised of a wire Boom Lift Pendant that is hung from an eyebolt set into the mast just below the hounds.  On the drawings, this pendant terminates in a single block through which the Boom Lift is reeved.  I started by setting up the Boom Lift in this manner

 

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After reading the article cited above, however, I felt that this would only provide a mechanical advantage of one.  Since this would make lifting the boom a very difficult task I decided to deviate from the drawings and to use a tackle comprised of a double and a single block.  This yields a mechanical advantage of three, and separates the Boom Lift into two segments.

 

A double block was seized to the Boom Lift Pendant. The lower segment of the Boom Lift is seized to the lower becket of a single block.  The upper segment of the Boom Lift is seized to the upper becket of the same block, and is then reeved through the double and single blocks and terminated at the pin rail of the port shrouds.

 

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Since the shrouds will not be completed until a later date, the boom lift was weighted by an alligator clip and was left suspended over the port side.

 

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The next post will address the preparations for installing Kathryn’s jib.

 

Thanks everyone!

Edited by Mahuna

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5 hours ago, Mark Pearse said:

Hi Frank,

 

is there something to stop the mainsail halyard from getting in the way of the boom jaws (when the sail is up)? It looks like when the boom rotates, the jaws will push on the halyard - 

Hi Mark.  Sorry, I can't answer that question - I had the same question when it came to running the halyard down to the cleat.  I checked my photos of Kathryn and it looks like I've rigged it correctly.  Looking ahead, the same question will probably come up when rigging the Jib Sheet - it ends at the port cleat on the mast.

728533191_MainHalyardatJaw.jpg.817a12dd2f0be85af228f6c816b11b69.jpg

 

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Hi Ron

 

Yeah, the Willie Bennett rigging plan has been really valuable.  I've used it in conjunction with a lot of the photos I have of Kathryn to help me understand some of the details.  I made a conscious decision on the Boom Lift to make a more practical tackle rather than what either plans show.

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Hi Frank,

 

I've been away from this forum for almost two years. but I remember you starting this model and I remember well your wonderful Dunbrody build.  This Kathryn build is also exceptionally well done and a pleasure to read through.  You take such extraordinary care in your research, modeling and your log presentation.  Thanks for sharing that with us.

 

I wish you a peaceful 2019.

 

Gary

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Thanks Kurt and Gary for the kind comments.

 

March has been a really busy month and I haven't been able to get any work done on Kathryn.  This is the time of year when friends and family like to visit Arizona to get the chill out of their bones.  I'm hoping to get back to work this week and to finally make some more progress on Kathryn. 

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