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Red Jacket by MrBlueJacket - FINISHED - BlueJacket Shipcrafters - Scale 1/8" = 1' (1:96)


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Time to start a new model. Made in Rockland, Maine in 1853, the Red Jacket was a clipper ship, one of the largest and fastest ever built. She was also the first ship of the White Star Line company. She was named after Sagoyewatha, a famous Seneca Indian chief, called "Red Jacket" by settlers.She was lost in a gale in 1885.On her first voyage, Red Jacket set the speed record for sailing ships crossing the Atlantic by traveling from New York to Liverpool in 13 days, 1 hour, 25 minutes, dock to dock. That record still stands today for commercial sailing vessels.

 

The BlueJacket kit has 5 sheets of plans. Sheet 1 has the pre-carved hull laid on top of it. This is going to be a large model! (41" LOA)

R1.thumb.jpg.d74e7d6584c8061b913199e3a5bcfd50.jpg

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It seems the Red Jacket was launched with anti-fouling paint on her hull, but once in England, the British put on copper plates. I will do her "as launched"  I think. I am also going to keep a time sheet, which is something I have never done before on a model.

 

I'm also thinking of adding a few furled sails of silkspan.

Edited by MrBlueJacket
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I bought the Sea Gull plans for Red Jacket and started the lofting.  The plans are 1/8" : 1'.  I loft at 1/4", but man! this is a huge ship.  The hull at the main deck is close to 250 feet long.  I do 1:60  and while anyone mad enough to build her at 1/4" would start with a 5.2 foot long hull less spars,  at 1:60 , it is

a daunting 4.2 foot beast. 

Wm Crothers' plans are still available - they are pretty detailed, but since they are drawn to support both solid hull and POF, I would not be surprised if Blue Jacket did not use Crothers as a basis for their plans.  Red Jacket has specific entries in his The American-Built Clipper Ship.

 

You will have quite a project there even at 1/8" scale, which is close to being in the miniature realm .

Wood Craft has some pretty thin veneer of Maple, Cherry and other species that scale to 1:96 OK,  so might consider planking the hull and choosing an anti-fouling paint color wood for the submerged part of the hull.  This would add additional time for the build.

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So I have roughed out the bow and stern, taking off most of the knobs left from the hull carving process. big wood block screwed into the deck so I can hold the hull in a vise. Marked off the centerline, the width of the keel, and the station locations. Now comes the boring carve, fit, check, then repeat ad nauseum. After that, make the bulwarks, then it should get to be more fun.

RJ1.thumb.jpg.082d91eb1497f1e172bb909e68cfc3e7.jpg

RJ2.thumb.jpg.55e8a3075fcfed34974c88227f628e5c.jpg

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Very interested in following this build. 

I have built several models, now, with solid hulls, several from kits. I became frustrated enough carving down what I judged to be grossly inaccurate kit hulls that I have reverted to building up my own solid hulls, which is a lot more work, but allows me to start shaping something that more closely resembles the finished shape. 

Perhaps my experiences have been anomalies. 

I wonder if you could show in your build log how much ( or how little) you have to carve off of the hull blank to get to the finished shape. 

 

Oh yeah ... it’s nice to see you thinking about furled sails while still carving the hull ... optimism at its best!

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Personally, I prefer plank on solid (POS) to plank on frame (POF) construction.  I have used both machine carved kit hulls and laminated scratch built hulls.  The following notes apply:

Machine Carved Hulls

  • Requires care in establishing reference lines
  • May require hull, deck, and/or bulwark build up
  • Hull carved inverted using reference board and templates
  • Hull initially carved to outer plank lines
  • Upper hull recessed for 3/64" planking, lower hull coppered
  • Thinning carved bulwarks requires care, they may be replaced with built up bulwarks
  • Reference my Brigantine Newsboy build log on MSW

Laminated Scratch Built Hulls

  • Ease in establishing/maintaining reference lines
  • Maintain rectangular configuration until completion of deck carving, deck layout, and drilling of mast holes
  • Hull carved inverted using reference board and templates
  • Hull initially carved to outer hull lines
  • Upper hull recessed for 3/64" planking, lower hull coppered
  • Requires built up bulwarks with timberheads slotted into hull block
  • Reference my Topsail Schooner Eagle build log on MSW

I find both techniques work well and require ~ 60 hours for hull carving

 

Regards,

Pete

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19 hours ago, Srodbro said:

Very interested in following this build. ............ 

I wonder if you could show in your build log how much ( or how little) you have to carve off of the hull blank to get to the finished shape. 

 

You can see the rough hull in the first picture. I'll take some progress photos as I carve.

 

Nic

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
3 hours ago, MrBlueJacket said:

My  first car was a white '62 Falcon sedan, 3 on the tree.

So of course the Big Question is, How many times to did you inadvertently grind from first gear into reverse? I won't say how many times I did. 🙄

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