Jump to content
dafi

HMS Victory by dafi - Heller - PLASTIC - To Victory and beyond ...

Recommended Posts

After some lenghty but fruitful discussion in our german forum about the orientaion of the free end left or right, forth or aft we found that almost all literature shows it the way that it is displayed:

 

- for the cable-laid shrouds - Starboard pointing foreward, larboard aft :-)

- for plain- or hawser-laid shrouds - Starboard pointing aft, larboard foreward :-)

 

The opnly one showing it vica versa is Marquardt in his Eighteenth Century Rigs and Rigging, funnily, his other book Schoner in Nord und Süd shows it the "common" way.

 
Some other information coming the way was incorporated immediately
- Max. distance of the big deadeyes twice diameter
- Tackle about half the diameter of the shroud
- Shroud not too tight around the deadeye
- free end of the tackle passes through the gap of deadeye and shroud
- free end shorter
 
And here we go Mark 2:
 
before:
Victory-140504_3316.jpg
 
After 
Victory-140508_3335.jpg
 
Still have to clear and belay the tackles to look less messy :-)
 
XXXDAn

 

Edited by dafi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Daniel

 

You are full of surprises , very nice deadeye jig. looks like you put a lot of thought into these,                                                                                       ENJOY.

 

Regards   Lawrence

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just added the difference inbetween cable-laid shrouds and plain- or hawser-laid shrouds in the entry upstairs :-)

 

This leads me to some further question:

 

- The top-mast shrouds were plain laid? This means the ends are pointing the other way than on the lower shrouds.

 

- The distance of twice diameter of the deadeye looks good on the lower shrouds lanyards. Is this applicable too for the topmast shrouds? There the distance usually looks much longer in comparison?

 

- When was the batten on top of shrouds introduced to maintain their orientation? Marquardt only makes a small remark in the picture section telling "about 1800".

 

- Was this also introduced for the topmast shrouds?

 

Cheers, Daniel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You ask some tough questions, sir.   ;)    I'd take your last two posts #637 and #640 and put them in the rigging section to ask the questions.  Might get a different set of eyes.   My simple answer is:  I have no idea.   Do you have Lee's Masting and Rigging book?  The answer might be in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Mark and Popeye!

 

I will put some further remarks*** and details over there ...

 

It is getting tighter ...

 

 

Victory-140508_3341.jpg

 

XXXDAn

 

*** sorry MArk, no pun intended ;-)

Edited by dafi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daniel,

 

I believe Henry has your answer.  I was going to dig out Lee's in a bit, but Steel is pretty definitive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I already digged the usual suspects and will soon give an account :-)

 

XXXDAn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other question:

 

I see that you rig the tackle of the backstay startting from the upper block, resulting in the running end going upwards were you belay it tot the backstay. Istn't that a bid uneasy when using: it would seem to me that strarting from the lower block results in a tackle for whcih the runnin gpart goes downward and can be secured at deck level of on the lower block.... 

(or isn't it the backstay tackle?)

 

Jan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it is the tackle :-)

 

I fixed as shown in McKay and Marquardt with the double block on the channels. The running end is shown in both going away horizontally. Could make sense if the tackle was shorter, because then there is no way of pulling the running end down effectively. 

 

In Portsmouth those tackles are quite long. And it appears to me that this one was hauled tight and then secured on the top, but could not make it up for shure. What other posible places to belay the running end could there be? Foot of an deadeye?

 

The only one I saw with the running end coming down from the top was Petersson (but with two single blocks).

 

XXXDAn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, but compared to that guy with his hammock, he needs a little step to get the line belayed at the top.

That's what made me wonder.

 

Jan

 

(PS still quoting Marquardt ? :) )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally found the detail:

 

post-182-0-29164300-1399883254_thumb.jpg

 

They took the running end up, through the loop over the deadeye and down again. Is this normal?

Look at the small lashings.

 

Cheers, DAniel 

Edited by dafi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ROFL 

 

:-)

 

 

Hy Jan, you are talking to a professional landlubber!

 

XXXDAn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks Kev!

 

Here coms the good night goody ...

 

... changed the orientation of the z-twist-ropes, used the heavy tools to fiddle the bits as ship shape as possible ...

 

Victory-140517_3457.jpg

 

... got happy about the results ...

 

Victory-140517_3464.jpg

 

... and my favorite picture of the day :-)

 

Victory-140517_3442.jpg

 

XXXDAn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... YES I confess I stole them ...

 

... and have to give them back ...

 

... the good thing is, the order did miss the date of return ;-)

 

XXXDAn

Edited by dafi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Daniel

 

Great work, you certainty are full of surprises, you never seam to run out of ideas to make your HMS Victory more realistic.                                                                 ENJOY.

 

Regards   Lawrence

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And off we go ...

 

Victory-140518_3470.jpg

 

... trying ratlines in different sizes and colors.

 

Victory-140518_3471.jpg

 

Seen by scale, the one in the middle it should be. But done out of 2 x Caenis 20/0 it is a bit too stiff for the job and only available in deepest black.

 

Underneath for comparison my usual 4-thread- 8/0 yarn, good to mix color and great to put in form, but too thick for my taste.

The two lines on top are 2-thread-8/0and fits much better size wise, ok to fit but more restricted color wise.

 

Still having the old discussion in my ear about the tarred ratlines, I believe most of them are either to dark or too light, I would personally expect in this case a much lighter brown from the stockholm tar. Already my shrouds have a dark brown touch for that reason, the lines should be more light.

 

So still have to try a bit to get the right tan ...

 

Cheers, Daniel

Edited by dafi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Continued my small bric-brac and made 2 more colour trials on the top ...

 

Victory-140527_3476.jpg

 

... finally was able to use my new clamps ...

 

Victory-140527_3486.jpg

 

... and finished the first two big dead eyes.

 

Victory-140527_3492.jpg

 

Ship shape und Bristol fashion enough for the scale?

 

Cheers, Daniel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Popeye :-)

 

Here is a site with all the etches I did so far

http://www.dafinismus.de/plates_en.html

 

Those clamps are part of the new Plate 7, that I revised. The old version is to be seen here:

 ... more ...

New pictures of this plate will come soon, as the official release will be this weekend.

The new version has shorter hooks, small eyebolts refined and the clamps with the foot as seen on the picture.

 

For the details go to the order-page:

http://www.dafinismus.de/order.html

 

Cheers, Daniel

Edited by dafi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dafi - those ratlines look fantastic.  I've always felt that the line used for ratlines is typically too large, your photos show a real contrast in the sizes which looks very realistic. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...