Jump to content
allanyed

What scale works best?

Recommended Posts

I hope to start construction of Litchfield (50) 1695 this coming year.   Her gundeck is 150 feet.  Over all length, rigged she is about 200 feet thus about  50" at 1:48,  37" at 1:64 and 33" for 1:72.     I am still wavering on scale, be it 1:48 or 1:64 or 1:72 .  As I hope to fully rig her and show good detail, I am leaning to 1:64 (or possibly 1:72) but nothing smaller after discussions with Ed T.   I really want to be able to get the detail, yet not have a monster to display but 1:72 worries me.   Old eyes and all that need to be considered.   I am looking for any advice from anyone that cares to share,  based on successful or not so successful experience.

Thanks to all

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After building the Winnie at both 1:64 and 1:48, I am always leaning towards the larger now.   Its just more enjoyable given the there are fewer teeny tiny parts that lack detail.  Building quarter galleries in both scales sealed the deal for me.

 

Chuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allan, I usually work at 1:96, but a larger scale certainly is easier to work with and makes a very impressive model - providing you have the space to display it!

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I go along with Druxey.  I'm building everything to 1:64 as I just don't have room for even one at 1:48.  It is a compromise especially with tiny details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allan, I am currently building at 1:72 but am finding it more and more difficult to add the level of detail I would like (although EdT   seems to be able to accomplish it :( ) All future builds will be at 1:40 for the reasons already given, PLUS there is a much larger 'after market' for some bits and bobs you may wish to purchase rather than scratch build.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thanks to each and everyone of you.   Room in the shop is not a problem, but in the house for display, it could be.   1:72 is definitely out. 

Thanks again and Happy New Year.

Allan

Edited by allanyed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Allen, Happy New Year everyone! I am just finishing the rigging on a very old "Aristo-Craft" 1815 Baltimore clipper 1:75 scale. I had decided to also rig the cannons even though the kit did not call for it. I must say it has been, let's say challenging! As I retired last Feb. I thought I could rip through the rigging and complete the kit in short order. As it turned out there is so much going on with all the static and running lines I can only work on it for a couple hours at a time and my eyes give out. I for one (at least for a clipper style) will look for larger scale ships in the future. Good luck and have fun on your new project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally find that irrespective of scale, I tend to pack as much detail into it as is physically possible with the available materials and tools. So building at a larger scale does not really change much in terms of dealing with miniature bits and pieces. It is true, however, that the standard marlinspike seamanship items are easier to make at larger scale ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/1/2020 at 8:20 AM, wefalck said:

I personally find that irrespective of scale, I tend to pack as much detail into it as is physically possible with the available materials and tools. So building at a larger scale does not really change much in terms of dealing with miniature bits and pieces. It is true, however, that the standard marlinspike seamanship items are easier to make at larger scale ...

I very much agree. I have found this to be the case, too.. The overall size of the finished (and cased!) model is a decisive factor for considerations of display space, but if "the sport in the game" is pushing the limits of one's "personal best" in terms of workmanship and skill within the the limits of the materials, then the scale is irrelevant. Given that, the scale really affects the amount of work, more than anything else. It may be easier to make some parts at a larger scale, e.g. rigging details, but then you've got that same level of detail to deal with elsewhere on the model, e.g. thousands of treenails to drill and drive in place!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am probably going to go for 1:48 because it will simplify construction - though I will have to set the yards to reduce space, not have the royals up etc etc. 

If I was just going for something to fit then the smaller the better but I eventually decided that it is the journey of making the model that is fun so even if I cannot display it then 'so what' - at worse it could stay in the workshop...

 

This decision may change once I have measured it out fully as I am almost ready to start on building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Matrim said:

This decision may change once I have measured it out fully as I am almost ready to start on building.

It may be helpful to actually build a mock-up of the case which would hold the model out of sticks or cardboard using a hot glue gun ("Martha Stewart style,") similar to the "story poles" they use on proposed building sites to actually see what the building will look like in place. I have been unpleasantly surprised on more than one occasion by the great difference in mass between a model on the bench and a model in a case in the house! Such a "quick and dirty" case is also a good thing with which to cover the model on the bench when you are not working on it during the building process. It protects it from dust, dirt, and damage during the sometimes long periods of time when you can't get to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

To confuse the situation,  digital calipers and electronic calculators allow the choice of scale that is not limited to integrals of the Imperial scale.

Facing your same dilemma,  I looked at the model as a 3D object.  I also like the level of detail possible with museum scale (1:48).  I also wish to have my "fleet" all at the same scale. Ships of the line tend to of an imposing size at 1:48.  I did some back of the envelope calculations, using 1:48 as the baseline.

1:60 = 50% of the volume

1:70 = 33%

1:76 = 25%

1:96 = 12.5%

I chose 1:60 in the hope that the level of detail would be close, with a less imposing size.

I framed the 118 gun Le Commerce de Marseille wishing to do both proof of concept for my method and see the size.  I admit, the size still has me a bit addlepated.

Edited by Jaager

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Between 1 /192 up to 1/24 scale, the main difference is: as much it is difficult to hold and to work with a small piece at 1/200, it is a lot easier to work and to hold a part in his hand.

 

The smaller the scale, the more  the details will literally disappear.  Duration is relatively similar  for 2 different scale. 

 

Space is a major factor; the largest  and easiest scale to easily manipulate a model is 1/48. If you go larger, you will need few larger tools to cut  and sand, Dremel will not  be enough.

 

Each scale has different challenges and need different tools. By opposition, to build a model at 1/200, yo will do a lot of work with magnifying glasses. To wear these require much more concentration; the smaller will be the scale, the greater will be the level needed and there will be almost no space to move the knife. Most of your energy will go on concentration.

 

At 1/24 scale, you do not to spend your energy only on concentration. You can discover new kind of happiness which is impossible to discover at small scale.  You will see more clearly, a lot of new details and you will be able to understand more how a real ship was build.

 

Depending of the challenge you want to try, you can choose a different scale. You should not limit your choice of the scale, to the space it will fill. Nobody has space for a 1/24 model of 8 feet long. My house is surely not  a big house, nevertheless, I have 3 models at that scale and every time,  I begin a new one, I never know where it will go in the house.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, my wife made it very clear, before we got married: models only in my study ... which really limits me to small sized models. This can mean either a larger ship at smaller scale, or a smaller boat at larger scale. For convenience sake, I limit the size of my models in a way that the profile drawing/side elevation fits onto an A4 paper, which means that I can print the drawings off an ordinary laser-printer.

 

As I like to display the models in an appropriate environment, I prefer 'railway model'-scales, because of the figurines available commercially (usually from German company Preiser). This means 1:160 for larger ships and 1:87 for boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, druxey said:

Another thought: larger scale, but with topmasts sent down, or in the process of rigging the lower masts only?

I can never remember where I saw this but I do remember seeing a first or second rate full quarter scale presented like this. The model had just lower mast and the shrouds and ratlines placed. All of the yards and the topmasts along with all the appropriate anchors were made in complete detail and presented on the ground beside the ship. It was a very impressive display

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...