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US Brig Syren by Gahm - Model Shipways

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I finished the tiller. Normally this should be a relatively simple piece to make. However, on my model when I initially built the rudder coat the rudder unfortunately was fixed in place in such a way that its upper end was no longer in the center of the rudder hole but was leaning to starboard (img. 1). I only noticed that several months later when it was already too late. So this needed fixing before the tiller could be mounted. I removed the upper part of the rudder with my rotary tool equipped with a diamond bur (img. 2), rebuilt the upper rudder part and added the tiller (img. 3). Now rudder and tiller are sitting in the center of the rudder hole (img. 4 – 5) and I have my peace of mind again :).

 

Thomas

 

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Dirk, Bob, and Mike, thank you for your supportive comments! It looks like you know the 'peace of mind' story yourself quite well  :). And thanks for all the likes!

 

Dirk, seeing your actions on the Confederacy I start to believe that you really mean it when you say that you are going to wait!? But you may need to finish your whole fleet before I may reach the status which your Syren already has  :D

 

Thomas

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It has been a while since my last update (too many other projects going on :)). I finally started with the rigging of the guns – first step the breech lines. After experimenting a little with different breech knots (img 1c) and different materials using a simple gun station jig (img 1a) I decided to go with the Syren rigging rope 0.025, a 100wt silk thread (img 1b), and the 3rd breech knot from the left in img 1c. It seems to be one of the most commonly used breech knots which I could find on images from carronades and naval guns of that period. Images 2 and 3 show the detailed steps of how to make the breech knot. In img 2d my ‘manual serving station’ can be seen. It comes in handy for small tasks. The finished knot is shown in img 3i. Img 4 lists the different steps for the 2nd knot of the breech line. The length of the line needs to be marked (img 4j) and the whole process described in img 2 and 3 repeated, only now with a gun ‘dangling’ on one end of the rope. The finished breech line is shown in img 5. Images 6-9 depict one half of the guns with breech lines – the other half still needs to be done ;). Img 10 shows the breech line for one of the long guns.

 

Thomas

 

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Good Job Thomas! Maybe check the length of the long guns rope .. it might be too long so that the gun interferer with the rigging of the rudder.

 

Edit: Have in mind that the plans rudder rigging is not correct ;) http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/1070-uss-brig-syren-by-dubz-model-shipways-164-18-gun-brig/page-51#entry252839

 

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cheers,

 

Dirk

Edited by Dubz

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Thank you Dirk and Tigersteve for your great feedback! And thanks for all the likes!

 

Dirk, with my first attempt of the long gun breech rope I acted on the assumption that the tiller was unhooked and used directly to steer the ship when the guns were operated. The length and shape of the Syren tiller would support that assumption. However, I have seen by now several models with shorter breech ropes (like you also suggest) and clearly need to revisit the length of that rope :) 

 

Thomas  

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Thomas,

 

Great build!

 

I'm am going to drill the mast holes before I get even building the gunwales. I like your jig idea. I'm making my Syren into The Argus which has a much larger rake angle on the aft mast than the Syren. With your type jig I can nail it.

Thanks

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I finished all breech lines and started with the gun tackles. For these I am using the 0.008’’ line from Chuck’s Syren company, served with a 100wt beige silk thread (image 1a), and the Syren 2mm single sheave boxwood rigging blocks. I opened up the holes in the blocks a little (77 drill), sanded the corners slightly with a fine sand paper and mounted each block on a wire loop to facilitate the handling of these tiny objects (image 1b). For hooks I went with the photoetched 3mm hooks from Dafi (http://www.dafinismus.de/plates_en.html#anker7). All parts needed for a hook-block assembly are shown in image 2c. Images 2 and 3 present the assembly sequence for a tackle and image 4 shows the finished result. For rope coils I used a variation of an idea from Richard (kscadman). Image 5 shows my jig which allows making rope coils right beside the gun. It also allows varying size and shape of these coils. I want to avoid for these coils to look all identical and ‘too perfect’. The first completely rigged carronade is shown in images 6 – 8. I still have to see whether I stick with this process for the remaining 17 guns . . . ;)

 

Thomas

 

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Image 8

 

 

 

 

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That is very, very, nice work Thomas, puts my fudged efforts around the side tackles to shame.

That's an interesting little cheese making device you have there😊

B.E.

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Eddie, Dirk, Bob, B.E., thank you for your kind comments! Especially considering the outstanding rigging results on your own models your feedback is highly appreciated! And thanks for all the likes!

Dirk, I know . . . one down, 17 to go :(

 

Thomas

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Thomas: amazing work to watch. Your ship is coming along wonderfully, and the detail is astounding. The Syren is on my list... and I could only hope to aspire to such levels. I do have a question that maybe you could help me with... from a beginner's perspective having never built a ship with cannons or other deck based arms: do you glue the cannons, etc, to the deck? If so, what do you use for that?

 

Thanks! I shall be sitting back and enjoying your build.

~john

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Thank you, John and Steve, for your kind comments! And thanks for all the likes!

John, yes I glue the cannons to the deck. For this I use a little droplet of Elmer's yellow wood glue underneath each wheel, and if some glue should show I clean it away with a wet paintbrush. As I glue wood to wood it actually bonds pretty strongly. I involuntarily had to test this bond when I had to remove one of the cannons to correct a little mistake after I had already glued it to the deck. It was surprisingly difficult :).

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