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Actually, things have become worse since that EU Directive took effect: now you have to explicitly disclose information in order to tell them that you don't want them to store exactly that information ... crazy.

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Hi folks, there may be a short delay in updates and responses as a good friend, Karl H Marquardt, passed away very recently and I am preparing to farewell him.

 

See 

 

 

regards

 

Pat

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Hi again folks, another small update with some additional detail to show.

 

I have now added the capstan, Elliott bitts and cable compressor after checking to be sure there was sufficient room for the bars to be fitted and turned.    The men would have had to peel off and regain a vacant bar in places though as even with the space available it was pretty tight.  The cable has yet to be blackened and fitted properly.  At least the contrast shows how it was put onto the capstan. 

326265818_ElliottBittsandCapstanFeb19.thumb.JPG.2292eb23253f52c58ab6a521acf99040.JPG  1954706729_ForecastleTopViewFeb19.thumb.JPG.797ea642f04abf18806552c4c717c568.JPG  IMG_3631.thumb.JPG.ffc450b3c382d31391e4de9a6e7480fa.JPG888733166_FunnelandCapstanFeb19.thumb.JPG.0e92bcb75db3689b7928a8f20942c2c1.JPG  217086774_AfterDeckFeb19.thumb.JPG.6e97c8bb7b693ee39aff7e78ac2e9b91.JPG

These are 3D parts we had printed but I had to replace the control levers as the parts are so small they broke too easily.  I have not included a ruler but for an idea the levers were only 9mm long and less than 1 mm wide.

1668104222_AdaptedCableCompressor.thumb.JPG.b5776da20e745a67ca15597ec1252b1c.JPG

I have also dry fitted the stoke hole skylight/ventilator with the funnel fitted and hammocks in situ.  I will add the chain tie-downs before gluing it into place.  The other shots provide some idea of the deck layout and fittings now added.

 

I have also had a chance to adapt one of the winches to better show the worm drive - still a good clean required as you can see all the filing dust.

1898131833_RevisedPurchaseWinch.thumb.JPG.a3d1f89bf987aa2e29900587e3d4259e.JPG

cheers

 

Pat

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Ship-shape and Bristol-fashion, Pat 👍  I like those bollards/bitts with the lips to keep the chain from wedging itself. Made a couple of those a few months ago and wonder, how you did them ?

 

Those compressors behind the capstan look a bit strange to me. They look more like the chain-stoppers that are usually found just behind the hawse-hole - you have one on her port side. These compressors are normally found above the chain-locker, to prevent the chain from slipping out, and have a horizontal lever the squeezes the chain against the pipe leading down into the locker. The lever is operated with a small tackle. Is this a different model ?

Edited by wefalck

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Hello all, and many thanks for the likes and supportive comments.

 

Carl, the levers are from brass strip (K&S) about 1.5mm wide, then hand shaped after drilling the holes at the appropriate distance apart.

 

Eberhard, I cheated :); the Elliott pattern bitts are 3D printed then airbrushed - I added hex head bolt to the four corners as the hold downs.  There should be a second set of bolts further in but I would damage the part adding those.

The compressors are correct for the Brown and Harfield pattern of that time as far as we can research.  They were the same as fitted to the 'Queen of the South' a contemporary mercantile vessel of 'Victoria' and commanded by Captain Norman, who was also the commissioning commanding officer for the 'Victoria'.  One of the Brown and Harfield patent drawings actually shows the fit as on the 'Queen of the South'.  There are two cable stoppers up forward near the hawse pipes, and these after pair, leading into the 'naval pipes' look a little different and were called 'controllers' but had the same function - control the run out speed of the cable as it approached the desired length on deck, and also to stop the cable slipping back.  They took no real strain, that was done by the stoppers and the capstan.

In Victoria, the cable lockers were located midships (5 tiers athwartship as far as we can tell) just forward of the stoke hole forward bulkhead so we believe they are positioned correctly.  My understanding so far (as we don't have a better 'internal mechanism' drawing) is that the upper deck lever was actioned with a 'handy billy' which then acted on the horizontal lever below deck as per a standard compressor - no detail of the linkage found yet.

 

If you have some additional info it would be greatly appreciated.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Another question for you more enlightened folks please.

 

I am about to add the 'charlie noble' which is located between the fore hatch and foremast.  It has a tall riser/funnel for use in harbour.  I have not seen a photo with it fitted at sea, but one lithograph hints at a shorter one when at sea and an engraving a tall one again at sea - perhaps telescopic or a two part funnel?

 

1712058483_Photocharlienobecropped.jpg.16946d348cd2c8d778ed059160116035.jpg  881196816_1855VictoriaLondonNewsImagecharlienoblecropped.jpg.fe53eef1e5d96d9af7a339e8b505119c.jpg  1788171821_Lithographcharlienobecropped.jpg.7d01cbb9e8c417b4c8bf77475d2fc991.jpg

 

My main question though is how the funnel would have penetrated the deck.  The stove is on the platform deck below, and even if the joint was below the upper deck, it would have required some form of waterproofed seal/gland at the upper deck.  Not sure if you want the cook going up on deck to place the funnel in the correct position to draw air and clear smoke in the right direction - would that have been a function of the upper deck guys whenever they changed course?  I don't see any wind vane adaptor on it to automate this.

 

My leanings are to have a stub of the lower section from the stove penetrate the upper deck through some form of gland and then the charlie nobe (whether 2 piece or telescopic) would simply fit to this stub?  I would then make that stub with a waterproofed cap that could slip on when the charlie noble was not fitted.

 

I would greatly appreciate any feedback noting that we are talking 1855.  I have found a letter from the Officer supervising the construction of the ship in London (Limehouse Docks) in which he states that the builders had chosen a galley/stove by Bedpath (The writing makes it look like Bedpath but perhaps Redpath? - There was a Redpath engineering in this era connected with improved stoves).

 

Any info on the following most welcomed:

 

1.  telescopic or two part?

 

2.  type of upper deck gland/gasket or the like?

 

3. Bedpath/Redpath galley/stove (galley could feed 200 people and the stove was fitted with a "Grant's style condenser - This was a two part stove which could be isolated to cook from both or one part, and produce water with the other as required.

 

cheers

 

Pat

 

Edited by BANYAN
clarify text

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Pat,

The stack doesn't rise through a grate like many warships?   Even with a stack there would be smoke and heat that needed venting.  I'd guess two part as telescoping would need some way of holding up fully extended.  

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Hi Mark, this is the galley stove funnel (charlie noble) which usually (as far as I know based on plans of contemporary vessels) did not rise through a grating but was fixed direct to the stove riser somehow (usually just a sleeve arrangement passing through some form of deck seal/gland (simple wood gland probably).  Sometimes this joint/ joining point was below deck. All the plans simply show a circle where it penetrated the deck :(

 

What I am trying to determine is whether this joint was below or above during this era, and if possible, determine whether it would have been a two part, telescopic, or single funnel arrangement.  I doubt it would have been more than 6 inches diameter and made from lightly cast iron?  As such probably did not need chain/wire supports or the like - but you have raised another interesting question with that - it is rather tall and any wind force would have put some strain on it?

 

cheers

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN
typo

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Some further small updates; not much but a start on the Accommodation Ladder (by another member) and I have started on some rigging screws for the funnel chains and the first of the broadside gun breeching rope ring bolts.

 

The first two photos show the top and under sides of the main part of the accommodation ladder - wood unknow.

 

The second two photos shows the parts for, and the made up and blackened rigging screws, and ring bolt etc.  The slightly larger rigging screw will be used elsewhere.

873827147_AccommLadderTop.thumb.JPG.5711e390808027e7f5a46cd48260b563.JPG  63298229_AccommLadderUnder.thumb.JPG.17522c137f2b5c5412b8f7301a506f84.JPG

1572011963_RiggingScrewParts.thumb.JPG.9cf9185fb809c70d94c9e2371b9255b3.JPG

386985991_MadeupRiggingScrew2.thumb.JPG.591ea7d35675c8c34c0e4d8803648f6e.JPG

cheers

 

Pat

 

 

Edited by BANYAN

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