Jump to content

3d printing process


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I was asked in another forum to explain the process i used to create deadeyes for the Great Harry in resin. I usually print models that i get from thingiverse.com which saves me having to create my own models. In this case though i did create the deadeyes in fusion 360 through trial and error mostly. I am not very proficient at using fusion 360 but i would recommend anyone who is thinking of using a 3d printer to look at some of the youtube video tutorials and learn from them. Once you have the STL or OBJ file that you want to print on your resin printer then there are a number of things that you need to do to print it correctly. Mainly around scaling and setting up the model correctly on the build plate. I use an anycubic photon s resin printer that can produce a high level of detail. If anyone has some specific questions regarding setting these printers up and printing models efficiently then fire away and i will do my best to explain what i know. If anyone wants to see what these printers are capable of i can attach some photos of models i printed and explain what i did. The attached photo is the deadeyes that i made earlier.

BF42A02E-EA6F-454D-A4EA-2F8A86E1AA60.jpeg

Edited by henrythestaffy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Druxey, here are the technical specifications for the printer. Unlike the plastic type printers that keep the build plate static the resin printers have a vat that the build plate lowers into. The lcd under the vat shoots the uv light where the model needs it for that layer and then the build plate raises and lowers again and the next layer is printed. The layer resolution shows that there can be between 10 to 40 raise and lowers of the build plate to make 1mm. Mine is set at around the 40 raises or 25 microns per layer.

Technical Specifications
● Printing Technology: LCD-based SLA 3D Printer
● Light-source : UV integrated light(wavelength 405nm)
● XY DPI : 47um (2560*1440)
● Y axis resolution : 1.25um
● Layer resolution : 25 ~ 100um
● Printing speed : 20mm/h
● Rated Power : 50W
● Printer size: 230mm*200mm*400mm
● Printing volume : 115mm *65mm *165mm (4.52″*2.56″*6.1″)
● Printing material : 405nm photosensitive resin
● Connectivity :USB Port
● Package Weight: 9.5kg
 
 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have done A LOT of 3d printing, mostly with fine detail parts sourced through houses like Shapeways. Whenever someone asked me what kind of printer I had, the answer was NONE- because affordable home printers had such horrible resolution and finish. Don't mess with the overhead I said, let Shapeways do that, and you'll get better parts to boot.

That's different now, with the new bottom-up LCD resin printers. And now I own one!
 

My little printer and a typical part:

a20210202_162917.jpg

i16139712213250.jpg

i16139712852152.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Resin printers really are a game changer compared to typical FDM (typical filament type) printers.  That said I've seen some pretty amazing clear prints out of Prusa and other printers that had been very tightly tuned.  Things like automatic bed leveling, stepper PID tuning, direct drive instead of Bowden tube, etc. can help a lot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/3/2021 at 11:28 AM, henrythestaffy said:

I have found that the positioning of the model and supports makes all the difference to the outcome. I used to try and hollow out my models but now i only make solid ones. All things that you learn from experience and can hopefully help new users with.

Do you know anything about this Wash & Cure option? It has a considerable price as an extra and I wonder if it worth the extra $.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been using the wash and cure for about a year now and wouldn’t go back to the previous method.   It is so clean and easy that I would recommend it to anyone starting out. The printers themselves have two lcd screens that are consumable. The main printing screen, depending on how often you use it, will need replacing at some point. Mine usually last around 1 to 2 years. Setting up the print vat with the PET plastic bottom can be a little tricky the first couple of times. Once you get it right though it is a breeze. I use a program called Chitubox to set my supports and positioning of the model. It’s free and then you send the model to the software that comes with the printer to slice it and you are right to go. If you are considering designing your own models I would suggest fusion 360. It also free for hobbyists and is a very good CAD/CAM program. It can be a little daunting at first but there are some excellent tutorials on the net for it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Well, My Anycubic Mono X finally arrived today, (2 days late after a 1k miles side trip around southern California) along with it's accompanying Wash & Cure Plus...... 

 

IMG_9764.JPG.6319a21771a802e455d73fae6d6f4657.JPG

Unfortunately, the 1 kg of resin that was supposed to be delivered with it didn't arrive.... I hope Anycubic is as good as the reviews say they are and they get it out quickly....

 

So until then, I'm still waiting...

 

Will say more when there is something to say... {chuckle}

 

EG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Egilman said:

Well, My Anycubic Mono X finally arrived today, (2 days late after a 1k miles side trip around southern California) along with it's accompanying Wash & Cure Plus...... 

 

IMG_9764.JPG.6319a21771a802e455d73fae6d6f4657.JPG

Unfortunately, the 1 kg of resin that was supposed to be delivered with it didn't arrive.... I hope Anycubic is as good as the reviews say they are and they get it out quickly....

 

So until then, I'm still waiting...

 

Will say more when there is something to say... {chuckle}

 

EG

We are looking forward to your test results.

Chitubox is considered by many the most advanced free 3d software. Some printers also offer  a free one year subscription to chitobox pro worth of 170$.

Personally I am interested on Elegoo Saturn for the increased     192x120x200mm print area and the 4k resolution.  The price is kinda raised at the moment around 450$ so I wait for a price drop while still researching. The FDA printers is something that i haven't turned down completely. They may lack in print quality a bit but they win in every other aspect comparing to resin printers.

Finally there are resins at the market which can be cleared only with water. Their curring time also is quite short eliminating the need for a washer. Their cost is about 50$ per bottle I think.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm looking at the mono also. Be careful if you have pets or children around, the resins are toxic.

 

If you watch the "What's Neat This Week" #158 podcast with Ken Patterson (on YouTube), one of the members, who made a 3D printed HO scale locomotive, talks about the resin he uses to make the print usable in an environment where toughness is involved. Most of the resins are too brittle for general handling. He 3D printed the drive gears too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, thibaultron said:

I'm looking at the mono also. Be careful if you have pets or children around, the resins are toxic.

 

If you watch the "What's Neat This Week" #158 podcast with Ken Patterson (on YouTube), one of the members, who made a 3D printed HO scale locomotive, talks about the resin he uses to make the print usable in an environment where toughness is involved. Most of the resins are too brittle for general handling. He 3D printed the drive gears too.

Thanks for the Warning, my Cat keeps eating leaves of flowers which are marked as "Toxic for Cats", also i caught her drinking water from the cup i use to clean my brushes after using them for PVA Glue/Paint so i dont think Resin would her ;)

 

I figured that at the cost of the Miniatures i would like to add to my Models i can actually get a printer and print them myself ;) 

 

Was thinking Filament printer but the Resin ones beat them by far at 28mm Miniature scales

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello folks - I don't intend to hijack this thread, but here are 2 items I printed, in resin, with my Photon S.  These used the stock slicer settings, but I am going start tweaking things as I get more into it.  These used the Anycubic resin.  I also am making some parts that are for real world use (not models) and I have switched to resins from Siraya Tech.  I encourage you to look at and research other resins, there are lots of them out there.

 

Egilman, enjoy your new printer!

 

These are for 1:48 scale (next to an inch ruler)  both were just tests of what could be done...

20210919_232833.thumb.jpg.77c853634f144840739ed5d80882a06a.jpg

 

20210919_232856.thumb.jpg.3769e7d56ffe6b1ca8273a6e2e4a176f.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have also been eyeing up the mono and can see there is a huge difference in the printing quality of a resin printer. They are reasonably priced now and want to see how everyone makes out with the Anycubic Mono.

 

The wash and cure station looks like a necessary piece also.

 

I am a little concerned about the smell during printing though and the Admiral has a keen sense of smell :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, mikegr said:

We are looking forward to your test results.

Chitubox is considered by many the most advanced free 3d software. Some printers also offer  a free one year subscription to chitobox pro worth of 170$.

Personally I am interested on Elegoo Saturn for the increased     192x120x200mm print area and the 4k resolution.  The price is kinda raised at the moment around 450$ so I wait for a price drop while still researching. The FDA printers is something that i haven't turned down completely. They may lack in print quality a bit but they win in every other aspect comparing to resin printers.

Finally there are resins at the market which can be cleared only with water. Their curring time also is quite short eliminating the need for a washer. Their cost is about 50$ per bottle I think.

Hi Mike,

 

I went with the Mono X for it's build area of 192x120x245... Anycubic didn't respond to my email about the missing resin today, probably take a couple of days so I went ahead and ordered a liter from amazon... I've downloaded Chitobox free and see I have another learning process to go thru...

 

Right now, I just want to get this up and running.... I will probably turn to water based resins eventually once I learn a bit more to save the costs of large quantities of IPA... I think even with water based resins the Wash & Cure will be an asset to keep things efficient....

 

Then I have to create something....

 

The Admiral is waiting..... {chuckle}

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, thibaultron said:

I'm looking at the mono also. Be careful if you have pets or children around, the resins are toxic.

 

If you watch the "What's Neat This Week" #158 podcast with Ken Patterson (on YouTube), one of the members, who made a 3D printed HO scale locomotive, talks about the resin he uses to make the print usable in an environment where toughness is involved. Most of the resins are too brittle for general handling. He 3D printed the drive gears too.

Thanks Ron, I bookmarked this for future reference... I'm very familiar with how brittle resin is in general....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Egilman, i would suggest downloading some files from thingiverse and practise putting supports on with chitubox. Chitubox will do it automatically but in most cases you will need to check them manually and add or subtract. The positioning of your model and angle on the build plate has a large bearing on success or failure. I dont use chitubox to slice my model, for that i use the photon workshop program that comes with the printer. If you need a hand just ask and i will do my best to help you avoid wasting resin and making unusable models.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Henry,

 

Phew, Thingiverse.... What a mess....

 

Everyone says get something from Thingiverse, most suggest a particular Eiffel Tower..... High res of course, problem is no one provides a link to it.... and there are 600 pages of Eiffel Towers... Some look great some not so great...

There are several online you tube walkthroughs of Chitubox and how to use it but I haven't found one yet that hasn't put me to sleep....

 

Reminds me of Blender in the early days, trying to find useful info that is presented well is a challenge..... You would think that something that is this revolutionary would now have a source of good verifiable info easily available after what 5 years? 

 

I think the biggest difficulty in getting into this is finding good reliable info... 

 

Thanks for the offer of help, I will be asking questions when I run into problems and will post my solutions, (with linkage) when I discover them... Still trying to figure out the workflow to getting from an STL file output from whatever software, (in my case solidworks) to a finished print...

 

New mountains to climb.... {chuckle}

 

Right now I just want to get the printer working and make sure there is nothing wrong with it.... once I get the print-wash-cure process down, I'll start working on fine tuning the process...

 

A door to a big huge world is opening, and I still have to get through the door...

All help is appreciated...

 

EG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Egilman said:

Hi Mike,

 

I went with the Mono X for it's build area of 192x120x245... Anycubic didn't respond to my email about the missing resin today, probably take a couple of days so I went ahead and ordered a liter from amazon... I've downloaded Chitobox free and see I have another learning process to go thru...

 

Right now, I just want to get this up and running.... I will probably turn to water based resins eventually once I learn a bit more to save the costs of large quantities of IPA... I think even with water based resins the Wash & Cure will be an asset to keep things efficient....

 

Then I have to create something....

 

The Admiral is waiting..... {chuckle}

 

I am still thinking if i really require the Larger build area, my goal is mostly to print Ship figures in 1:64 Scale and Lego-Compatible Parts for my Son.

 

As for Thingieverse, well, that's the Problem of it being "Community-Driven" and not moderated by any means...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Egilman said:

Hi Jacek,

 

I need the larger build area specifically cause I'm going to be building one of these......

1292004992_Apollo1011(5).thumb.jpg.66915353d5a2d37de25b195f7c65bb3c.jpg

Easiest way is to 3D print it rather than scratchbuild it.... 1/72nd scale to fit the Dragon Saturn V....

 

But first, I have to create the files.....

 

Big mountain to climb....

There is definitely a "nice to have" if it comes to larger build areas, i am trying to figure out the downsides (apart from definite model size) from getting a smaller printer up front and then perhaps switching down the road

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good question...

 

I don't think I have any good answers.. Wish I did....

 

Outside the initial cost factor, you have to decide how big your going to build... What scales your going to be working in and what type of projects.... Think towards the largest single part you will need towards what your going to build... Get it's measured size in real life, down scale it to your working scale, and buy build volume accordingly...

 

One of the advantages of larger build volume is you can make repetitive parts in one printing, you need a dozen of a certain part you can do it in one print rather than a dozen separate prints... That's my situation, I'm going to need a dozens of tall parts that are identical or close to identical, that measure around 8" so a 9.5" print height is required... The Mono X will print a dozen of those all at once easily...

 

That how I reasoned it out....

 

It all depends on what you want to do with it....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Egilman said:

Good question...

 

I don't think I have any good answers.. Wish I did....

 

Outside the initial cost factor, you have to decide how big your going to build... What scales your going to be working in and what type of projects.... Think towards the largest single part you will need towards what your going to build... Get it's measured size in real life, down scale it to your working scale, and buy build volume accordingly...

 

One of the advantages of larger build volume is you can make repetitive parts in one printing, you need a dozen of a certain part you can do it in one print rather than a dozen separate prints... That's my situation, I'm going to need a dozens of tall parts that are identical or close to identical, that measure around 8" so a 9.5" print height is required... The Mono X will print a dozen of those all at once easily...

 

That how I reasoned it out....

 

It all depends on what you want to do with it....

Ye the point is, i would start with small stuff, propably 1:64 scale figs and Lego parts but then at one point i am sure i would realise i want to build larger things as well.

 

Decisions ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   1 member

×
×
  • Create New...