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HMS Druid by Krug - 1:48 Hahn finished


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Greetings (again).  Returning to MSW after a bit of off time (eg I just completed my 5th sprint triathlon).  I have not been idle and have lately been kicking it into high gear with my version of the HMS Druid.  Believe it or not, started in 2003 (two kids and a couple of homes ago) but looking to finish in the first quarter, 2014.  I have loved every minute I have spent - probably a little over 300 hours so far.

 

I just finished with the bow assembly (sans the eking rail which will wait until the cathead is affixed).  Previous to that was the stern caprail.  I believe I am on the downhill of this build.  Next up is finishing the rudder metal work and then working up from the berthdeck finishing all the details.

 

Additionally I have made progress on my Lady Anne and finished the DaVinci wing (currently on display at the Michigan Aviation Academy), but that will be a subject for another day.

 

Mark

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Sweet looking build, Mark   Is that boxwood you used?

Mark
"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me

Current Build:                                                                                             
Past Builds:
 La Belle Poule 1765 - French Frigate from ANCRE plans                             Triton Cross-Section   

                                                                                                                       USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War  _(Gallery) Build Log

                                                                                Wasa (Gallery)

                                                                                                                        HMS Sphinx 1775 - Vanguard Models - 1:64               

 

Non-Ship Model:                                                                                         On hold, maybe forever:           

CH-53 Sikorsky - 1:48 - Revell - Completed                                                   Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0 (Abandoned)         

         

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

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Primarily basswood.  Only the details (rails, cheeks and moldings) are boxwood.  I can acquire the basswood locally as I need it (amortize the cost) and by using sharp tools I really don't have too many complaints.  It is a good chance my next build will be the same.

 

Mark

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Today the object was to rough in the pass through blocks, two each side.  They will not be installed until the internal planking is complete (for ease of planking).

 

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Their construction was pretty straight forward.  I used 1/32" sheet basswood and cut out the box shape pieces.  A basic jig was cut out to insure the inner opening was consistent both all the way through the piece, but also all four constructions.  These pieces are built considerably over sized to allow for shaping and final fit later.

 

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A small circular piece is inserted to mimic the internal block.  After construction the pieces are sanded to thin out the dimensions even further.  Once the position on the hull is identified and marked, the hull was drilled through at the four corners and the rest cut out.  To cover any gaps upon final install, basswood is great for just injecting a little glue into the gaps and then sanding and pushing the sawdust into filling the gaps.

 

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The inside will have additional supports glued in to insure the pieces go in and out exactly the same.  A little time well spent in the shipyard.

 

Mark

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Thanks, Brian.

 

The wood is natural.  This being my first such build, the complications of applying a finish really got my head spinning.  You need to apply as you go and be real sure you don't need to glue something onto that surface later on.  So...I opted for no finish.  The flexibility it gives me provides no regrets.  I am still pondering whether I will do this the same way for the next build - but first I need to get this one done!

 

I am almost done with the external hull fixtures.  Chesstrees and steps are up next.  After the rudder is affixed I want to keep the hull handling to a minimum.  The Orlop is complete and I am waiting on the rudder arm to be able to button up the berth deck.

 

Mark

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You will be applying some sort of finish after the hull is completed, won't you?  With soft woods in particular, a penetrating finish will help stabilize the wood and decrease its swelling/shrinkage with changes in humidity. 

Toni


Chairman Nautical Research Guild

Member Nautical Research and Model Society

Member Midwest Model Shipwrights

 

Current Builds:     

Completed Builds: Longboat - 1:48 scale       HMS Atalanta-1775 - 1:48 scale       Half Hull Planking Project      Capstan Project     Swallow 1779 - 1:48 scale               Echo Cross Section   

Gallery:  Hannah - 1:36 scale.

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RIght now I have no plans to.  This hull has been around for 8 years (assembled) and been very stable so far.  Also, there are already regions I am unable to adequately reach.  With basswood really need some sort of sealer.

 

This whole ship has been a learning experience for me.  Most items (where possible) are doweled or positioned with clamps as opposed to glue to allow some movement.  I attach an internal pic of the orlop deck which has survived with no ill effects so far.

 

Loving the hobby,

Mark

 

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On to the chesstrees.  There is definitely a few hours here as will be explained below.  My first gut was to jump right in, make a cardboard template to match the hull shape, transfer to a wooden piece and get'r done.  Well, I never really like butt joints that show and in this case I was unable to get a real tight fit all around the chesstree.  Pause to think.....

 

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Well, the easiest way is to inset the chesstree into the planking.  So, I carefully trace around the chesstree and chisel half a plank depth away.

 

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The result is much more satisfying.  As a bonus, the joint will be a whole lot stronger.

 

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Now here came the biggest problem to overcome, creating the sheave hole.  At first I jumped in and carefully drilled a hole at both ends of the sheave hole and tried to remove any remaining wood in between.  I didn't even take a picture as the result was totally unacceptable no matter how much I carefully filed, scraped and poked.  I ended up walking away for the night. 

 

Later on the solution came to me and involved keeping it as simple as possible.  I would cut into the chesstree to the sheave from the bottom.  Once everything was cleaned up (now that the entire hole was accessible this was easy), a small section of wood would be replaced.  Very quick and the result I liked very much.  The actual block you see is one fashioned quickly and will be replaced.

 

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So overall the process was probably 3.5 hours.  The next one for the port side will probably be done in less than half the time but I am okay with that.  I ended up with something that looks good and methodically worked through the issues as they came up. 

 

Cheers,

Mark

Edited by kruginmi
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After (finally) getting the college girl out of the house and moved into her apartment I found some time and got the port chesstree and pass through hull blocks roughed in.  These will be finalized after the rail is installed in the future.

 

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Pondering all this talk about putting a finish on the hull, I created a little test piece and tried some Minwax Polycrylic.  Because basswood so porous nothing works fantastic, but after three coats (sanding between) I wasn't very happy with the result.  At certain angles it looks fine, but at others a shiny splotchy residue is evident.  The following picture gives a hint of this.

 

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I did try some paste wax and that didn't look too bad but has to be applied with a rag and then buffed out.  Not so good for between the frames and anything internal.  I am pondering to pick up some clear sealer / shellac and see what that will do.  I still have pretty good access - only the berth deck floor is attached.  Everything else is currently held by friction and removable trunnels.

 

If that doesn't work I will probably go back to the original plan - a good case.

 

Mark

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zilsner shellac and sealer had relatively the same result as the polycrylic - though slightly better.  Application wise the plycrylic is much easier to clean up (water based) so if I really needed to, I would probably opt for this.  The question is do I really need to.  As is usual when you hit a roadblock, I will put it aside and think before jumping in.

 

Mark

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Let's see. Banging headache (hoping it didn't go into a migraine). I did
something to my heel and it hurt to walk. Too many things to do around the
house. So....best just go to the workshop. It was the right cure because a
couple of hours later and I am feeling better (head wise) and I am reflecting on
completing the entry steps (starboard side at least).

Those items had been a little intimidating - why? I don't know. I stumbled
across some 1/32nd inch cutoff discs for my dremel (so much easier than the
1/16th inch), drew up a simple molding pattern and had it quickly cut out. I
actually found a previously cut piece of boxwood that matched the dimensions
required. Some quick scraping and cutting to equal lengths and I was ready to
glue.

 

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I laid down some paint tape to get a straight line and cut out a spacer to
insure they match. The big question was whether the eighth step would rest on
the wales as the plans show....and yes it did.

 

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This almost was too easy. What did I forget or mess up? Still haven't figured
it out yet (hah, hah). Pics are posted. I do laugh to see how the camera
really seems to magnify all the issues, dents and everything wrong that are
invisible otherwise.

 

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One almost oops moment was when I as verifying the distance from the steps to the end of the waist railing - it was too short.  A couple of anxious moments before I realized (so many years ago) that I had intentionally left the upper railing long to allow cutting down in the future.  So, no issues.  Tonight I hope to get the port side done. This will officially end the external hull work (sans the eking rail which waits until the cathead is affixed). The rudder metal work awaits.

Mark

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Very nice looking Druid, Mike. Are you working from Hahn's plans? She was my first plank on frame model and I have fond memories of building her. If you don't already have David Antscherl's Swan books you may wish to purchase them as they are both essentially sixth rates.

Edited by dvm27

Greg

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Greg,

 

Believe it or not this is a trip down memory lane for both of us.  This is the same Druid from back in the Warrior website days.  You supplied me with some stern shots of your model that were very helpful in formulating a plan of attack.  I finally say that this will be done in the first quarter 2014.

 

I do have the Swan books and even when not building because of life have continued to read and learn from everything I could.  Love the hobby even if my production rate is so slow!

 

Mark

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try for a finish of bees wax and turp i plan tp use it on my bass wood as it leaves sort of a dull finish unless you buff on it and it seals the wood. somehere on the site someone turned me onto it had a recipe of sorts i think it was Edt. you will get depending on the bee wax used as there are many types and colors tou will basically get the same color you have but with protection from the elements and its cheap.

 

doc

RIP dad 10 apr 2010

RIP my dog "Copper" BBF 24 june 2013

 

when in question build it yourself at least the first time.

when a clamp is needed "Ducktape it"

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Hi Mark, what a great and inspiring build you have going here. I'll be watching with interest.

 

. . . . . I do laugh to see how the camera
really seems to magnify all the issues, dents and everything wrong that are
invisible otherwise. . .

 

Mark

 

 

I was glad to read your comments on how the photos are really brutal in relation to what we "think" we really see!!! 

I thought that I was the only one who gets scared when I see some of the close-up pics of my model ~ scared to let anyone else see some of them!

Now, if only I could photoshop them to make everything look perfect . . . post-4495-0-00726000-1376993588.gif 
 

Jim.

 

I cut it twice . . . . . and it's still too short!

 

 

HMS Leopard 1790; scratch build 1:80 PoB

Cross Section - HMS Leopard 1790 - 1:44         

        

 

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I think I might have a winner.  I should have checked the paint section of this forum for potential hints, but after a trip to the local Woodcraft and asking the grizzled veterans there General FInishes Gel Urethane came highly recommended.  Now, the label says wipe on and that is a potential issue, but the gel was very viscous and a paint brush worked very well.  If you paint it on consistently in one direction, any excess is essentially removed negating the need for wiping.  It does need to dry overnight but I am okay with that. I took some surplus steps to verify it can handle small fiddly bits and there was no issue.  Definitely no shine like the the other two finishes I tried.  No fuzzies or crazy grain rising either.

 

It recommends 2-3 coats but visually there wasn't much difference so.....one coat for the hard to reach internal surfaces and two coats for everything else.  There is a slight change in color and the potential to darken some with age but again I have no issues with that. 

 

Once I start I think it should take about a week of steady work to get it covered.  Then I can incrementally do the internal sections as they are completed and ready.

 

Mark

 

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Finally got the time to put one coat of the gel urethane on the starboard side (to include in between the frames).  In the picture of the bow the location of the eking rail was left 'in the raw.'   Due to lighting issues, the bow pic is a little washed out.

 

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This wasn't that hard to apply at all.  It made the frame components really pop and highlight the plank joins.

 

I am still looking at applying another coat.  This was a good thing to do and I am glad I was pushed in this direction.

 

Mark

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Hello Mark,

 

thats highly inspriational for me, very well done work! The ideas you have shown are great... a steps spacer - gereat!

 

Thanks a lot!

Christian 

How lucky onshore whilom you have been

you will remake whensoever the ship is sinking.

Seneca

 

__________________________

Building:
HMS Wolf 1752, 1/48 snow-rigged Sloop 6pfd - 10 guns

Breton Thuna fishing boats 1/125 (plastic) & 1/50 (wood)

Reconstruction:
HMS Flying Fish 1806, 1/48 Baltimore Schooner 12 gun

 

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Thanks, Christian - I don't trust myself for measuring anything!  Either created spacers or dividers for distances right off the plans. 

 

Brian - I think it will be worth it.  Some more of the unknown has been broken apart for the next build!

 

On the subject of painting, I have been steadily working around the hull giving a couple of coats.  Hopefully done by the end of this weekend.  I did go down memory lane, however.  I needed to remove the gun deck floor to give brush access to the berth deck (the lower holds will stay as is).  It had been years (literally) since this had been put in and i couldn't remember if it was glued or not.  I gently worked from each end  and was relieved to find it wasn't.  Each carlings and ledges grouping is glued into a unit but still free from the deck beams.  That floor was solid even without glue and I patted myself on the back.  I ended up with a couple of boards full of pieces - NOTE TO SELF:  DO NOT DROP, PUT IN SAFE PLACE, REMEMBER WHERE SAFE PLACE IS.

 

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The berth deck as it exists today:

 

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As is normal with Hahn plans because of the amount of flooring and visibility, there are no knees.  I am sticking to this plan.  A little more clean up required but this level is essentially done excepting the rudder.  The rudder arm should go underneath the gun deck beams and through rigging have the lines go up the middle deck area to the steering on the top deck.  (next project).

 

Some more memory lane items was the recovered stove.  Basically cannot be seen but the stove pipe can.  In keeping witht the theme of the build, it is constructed out of basswood:

 

post-6104-0-72553800-1377785593_thumb.jpg  post-6104-0-45805500-1377785594_thumb.jpg

 

You might have noticed my Krugism.  When I started this build I wanted to have a distinctive feature, a feature that would readily identify this as a Krug build.   You may have noticed that this hull is essentially uni-color EXCEPT the false keel.  For that I used Purple Heart wood.  That's right, Purple Heart.  It definitely darkens with time, it is hard to see regardless, but I am thinking not too many other model ships out there  will have this 'feature.'

 

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Finally, I have started mocking up the name lettering on the stern before I attempt to carve them out of boxwood.  I haven't done really any investigation on preferred font or sizing but my first guess is  'Stencil' size 20.  I will ponder this some more.

 

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Thanks for looking, comments welcome.

Mark

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Thanks John,

 

I think my 'safest' place stayed so for a little over two years during and after a house move.  I stashed some of my best hand tools and current project (rudder for the Lady Anne) in a ship kit box to insure their recoverability.  I looked everywhere for those things and even replaced some of the tools.  Well, that ship kit was stashed and never looked at until one day when I just happened to pull it down and then that a-ha moment, and complete recollection.  I think some old age might be coming into play.

 

Mark

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got all the beams painted (carilngs and ledgings too) on the sides and underside but nothing photogenic so I skip the attached pic. 

 

I did notice I had not finished the gun deck supports so I had to get a few manufactured.  I dug around my odds and ends box and found the original (simple) jig I had made for those things.  Wasn't too long before I had the ones required made up.

 

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I do dowel them into the lower deck but skip this step for the top end.  Just too hard to get everything aligned.

 

My biggest hope was to fashion the metal work for the rudder.  Pulling down my supplies I found my flux had dried up to look like some meteor just fresh through the atmosphere.  I could not find the stuff local and spent days and $$'s trying other stuff that just didn't work.  Finally ordered the original stuff and hope to get it later this week:

 

Handy Flux for soldering or brazing gold, silver, brass, copper  8 oz.

 

Hopefully more progress to show soon,

Mark

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Brian, yes this is 1/48th.

 

I chose this model (so long ago) because of the limited carvings and lack of quarter galleries.  Being a converted merchant ship the internals are also a little more open.  Some interesting areas are the forward area of the berth deck, which the Royal Navy lowered to allow inclusion of the regulation ship's stove  and the extension of the quarter deck to allow the windlass to be included. 

 

I am undecided as to which Hahn model is next up for me.  I try not to think too much about it and keep at the task at hand, however the Oliver Cromwell jumps out.  He has a lot of other plans that i don't see being made here, though, so those also call.

 

The 1/48th scale is perfect for me and the detail that is achievable with my thick fingers and tools at hand.  It will always be my first choice.

 

Mark

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Finally - the replacement for my silver solder flux showed up in the mail today!  This hobby is not just for learning things about wood!  It starts that way, but then you have to branch out into all types of finished (shellacs, urethanes and all things acrylic).  Just when you get comfortable, metalurgy comes to the forefront and the chemistry of soldering.  My mix of supplies are:

 

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This flux works like a charm where all others have failed.

 

For the gudgeons and pintles (rudder work) I needed to replicate the look with what I had available.  With some thinking I opted for prototyping using some brass strips, tube and rod (that fits into the tube).  On the hull side I soldered a section of tube to the brass strip on the outside facing.  On the rudder side I soldered it on the inside and added a section of rod to allow the two pieces to mate.

 

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This result is still very much in the rough for fitting to their wood sections but I believe the end result that is possible is acceptable.

 

post-6104-0-47954900-1379106524_thumb.jpg

 

Now I have to fashion the final assemblies for all the attachment points and insure I am able to drill holes through the brass sheet to allow for the nails.  I am currently assuming to make an indent at the right drill locations in the brass, probably use a bit of oil for lubrication and slowly make each required hole.  These will be small and I am hoping to not sacrifice too many bits. Suggestions are always appreciated.

 

Mark

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Super soldering job.......

 

Rob

Current build:

Build log: https://modelshipworld.com/topic/25382-glory-of-the-seas-medium-clipper-1869-by-rwiederrich-196

 

 

Finished build:

Build log: of 1/128th Great Republic: http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/13740-great-republic-by-rwiederrich-four-masted-extreme-clipper-1853/#

 

Current build(On hold):

Build log: 1/96  Donald McKay:http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/4522-donald-mckay-medium-clipper-by-rwiederrich-1855/

 

Completed build:  http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/gallery/album/475-196-cutty-sark-plastic/

The LORD said, "See, I have set (them) aside...with skills of all kinds, to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver, and bronze, to cut and set stones, to work in wood, and to engage in all kinds of crafts."

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Thanks Rob for the vote of confidence.  I am still very much a neophyte with silver soldering.  It was key for me to find someone who already did it (in my case he did jewelry) and could specify exactly what equipment / supplies I needed.

 

Then it is practice, practice, practice.  Future growth for me sees ordering more silver solder with a different melting point (I think something like 4 types available).  This allows you to attach multiple pieces together without undoing any previous work.  Sounds good in theory.

 

Still working to get those holes drilled and verify I have a path to success without destroying the rudder.

 

Mark

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Sometimes it is easier to drill flat stock, then bend it into the approriate fashion then solder.

 

Sometimes a jig built for the purpose is required.

 

Good job non the less.

 

Rob

Current build:

Build log: https://modelshipworld.com/topic/25382-glory-of-the-seas-medium-clipper-1869-by-rwiederrich-196

 

 

Finished build:

Build log: of 1/128th Great Republic: http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/13740-great-republic-by-rwiederrich-four-masted-extreme-clipper-1853/#

 

Current build(On hold):

Build log: 1/96  Donald McKay:http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/4522-donald-mckay-medium-clipper-by-rwiederrich-1855/

 

Completed build:  http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/gallery/album/475-196-cutty-sark-plastic/

The LORD said, "See, I have set (them) aside...with skills of all kinds, to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver, and bronze, to cut and set stones, to work in wood, and to engage in all kinds of crafts."

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