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KORTES

Friech Boeir Yacht SPERWER by Kortes -1:30 scale

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7 hours ago, Griphos said:

 

 

This is just incredible work!  Quite inspiring, both in terms of the quality of work, and the level of detail. Your ingenuity and creativity in methods and materials has taught me a great deal.

 

i have a rather generic question that I hope won’t derail the topic. I’m particularly impressed with your metal work, something that is a mystery to me. Some I can tell is formed from brass sheet and rod and soldered and filed to shape. Some appears to be cut from thicker sheet stock, perhaps by hand, and filed to shape. But some appears to be turned. I’m wondering how you learned your metal fabrication methods. Is there a good resource book that teaches techniques specifically for scale ship models? Perhaps particularly for the lathe?  

 

I had a Taig lathe a number of years ago but never did really learn how to use it and eventually sold it. 

My greetings Griphos,I'm very glad that my experience and some of the technologies seem interesting to You.

Regarding the work wwith metal, honorable Wefalck is right, the skills come with experience. I haven't read any literature on this subject. Nowadays, in the internet era we can learn the theoretical part from many resources, and the experience will be gained only with practice, we dont have to be afraid of difficult work and be prepared that probably some components would have to be redone several times - it's the only way to gain experience. And one more point, a big equipment stock makes the work considerably easier, but doesn't guarantee high-quality result. The more advanced the instrument is - the more practice it requires. Whereas the absence of equipment stock requires  non-standard solutions in the working process.:)

My best regards.

 

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5 hours ago, Keith Black said:

 This is museum stuff right here! And I'm not talking some little Podunk museum, I'm talking a "national" transportation museum. 

Dear Keith Black,

Thank you very much  for such a high evaluation of my work.

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I would like to ask, please, if anybody could tell me why flagpole has such form? Is this a tribute to tradition or is there any other reason?

My best regards.

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There's a lot of good machine tutorials here:  https://littlemachineshop.com/Products/product_new.php   The learning tab has them but the other tabs also have topics of interest. 

 

Another good one is here:  http://www.mini-lathe.com/Default.htm    Again, links for their other machine tool tutorials.

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34 minutes ago, KORTES said:

I would like to ask, please, if anybody could tell me why flagpole has such form? Is this a tribute to tradition or is there any other reason?

My best regards.

You could ask Jan @amateur he is wel versed in the Dutch models

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Hi all,

 

did some googling, and there is no answer. Its tradition.

I think Kortes (or Sperwers builder)  slightly overdid: in most cases the lower half is not curved, and the upper part is, to such an extent that the cap is at 45 degree angle to the waterline (more or less)

 

I guess that it goes back to the 15th centyry, when also mastheads had a curved upper part (as far a I know: just to please the eye)

nothimg to do with bridges: the lowered mast is higher , and the flagpole is not fixed, and can be removed)

 

Jan

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I think Kortes' representation is pretty accurate, though the curvature is difficult to judge from the angle from which I took this picture:

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Flagpoles are inclined so that the flag unfolds even without wind and thus becomes recognisable. Why it is curved is anyone's guess, one reason could be that the Dutch in baroque tradition didn't like straight lines and a more practical reason could be that in this configuration the flag is less likely to wind around the pole and thus become unrecognisable.

 

Concerning the low bridge in the picture above, one has to keep in mind that many such fixed bridges were installed from around the end of WW1 on, when motor traffic became more intense and goods shifted onto the roads, requiring bridges with higher load-capacities. The (wooden) draw-bridges, that would have been there before, became also too expensive to maintain at a time, when most boating was for pleasure only. Also smaller 'grachten' (canals) were meant to be accessible only by small boats that were rowed, poled or drawn, not by larger sailing boats.

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1 hour ago, wefalck said:

Also smaller 'grachten' (canals) were meant to be accessible only by small boats that were rowed, poled or drawn, not by larger sailing boats

 A Boeir is clearly visible under the footbridge in the background. 

 The Torensluis Bridge "completed in 1648 and is Amsterdam’s oldest bridge still in its original state. It was once part of a moat around Amsterdam, so it is also the widest bridge in the city. Look for the barred windows under the bridge that serve as a reminder of the former prison once housed there". 

 Every photo of the Torensluis Bridge I click states "maybe copyrighted" so anyone interested in viewing will need to Google. The Torensluis Bridge ceiling height is more than the photo of the footbridge I posted. 

 There are some 1,200 bridges in Amsterdam. An interesting hobby could be made of visiting and studying Amsterdam's bridge history.  

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Hello Keith,

 

There is absolutely no boeier there. That is a small 'schouw', probably a tourist visiting Amsterdam, or a local owning a boat that he uses to sail on the Amstel.  Boeiers are sailing ships for the larger (mostly inland) waters. The moats in Amsterdam are/were a bad place for sailing ships: you can't get into those without the help of a motor (or rowing/poling), and a boeier can't be rowed.

 

The moats are for transportation purposes: getting your goodies from the harbor to your warehouse. And a boeier is not suited at all for any kind of transportation. So no: no boeiers or any other larger sailing ships ever were in the Amsterdam moats. Therefore a fairly large amount of the bridges have always been fixed bridges (apart from a   couple of the bridges over the river Amstel, and the canals connected to the Amstel.

 

And believe me: a boeier will never be able to pass a bridge  as low as the one you showed :)

 

Jan 

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and with respect to the curvature: perhaps I overestimated the curvature in Kortes picture, but This is what I referred to:

 

50ba6f35c65107a93b63902b9c73d430.thumb.jpg.6953ff7fe6d9a48f0a13267876db8ce1.jpg

Straight for the lower half, curved only the upper half starting some distance above the iron ring that holds it. 

I guess the love for curves did play a role in this design.

 

Jan

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4 hours ago, amateur said:

There is absolutely no boeier there

Jan

 Sorry, the vessel on the right with the leeboard and lowered mast made me think it was a Boeir........KB

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Thank you very much, my dear colleagues for Your interesting messages.

 

I  think it's related to the length of the giek, and, I think, the tribute to tradition has also played its part

 

My best regards.

post-218-0-17522300-1370049036.jpg

Edited by KORTES

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Nicely done 👍  Actually, at that scale they would have almost deserved to have real sheaves ... at least I would round the area around the holes so that the rope doesn't make a bend (as seen on so many models), but rather a nice curve.

 

It also reminds me that the Dutch used some odd-shaped blocks, such as the one with the integrated half-clamp to belay the main-sheet.

Edited by wefalck

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Greetings, my dear colleagues. Thank you very much for the evaluation of my work.

I’ll try to answer the questions about the making of blocks.

I used pear tree , brass wire 0,8 and 1,0 mm. Thickness of brass - 0,3 mm.

I would like to point out that the technology is based on the hand- making of each block, because each block has a different shape and size. Since there are not many blocks on the yacht, I didn't make up any mechanical method of production.

Blocks were made ith the immitation of the sheaves. I know from experience that on the blocks that are equipped with cable, block sheaves are not seen.

 

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The making.

Unfortunately, I didn't document all the steps, so i’ll try to explain in words.

I made blocks of the required form.

Cut the stripes of brass of the required width.

Adjust the shell of a block individually, using each block as a pattern, which guarantees push fit after soldering.

Hooks are bent separately out of the wire 1,0 mm. After the bending, we cut the end with a thin saw used for metal works. and make the shape on which will be soldered the ends of the shell of the block.

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After that the shell of the block is being soldered to the end of the hook. I used the the clamp as seen above. After the soldering, the extending points of the ends  are cut off with broaching file and mini-drill. On this stage I also made the final shape of the hook using the same equipment.

On some blocks, apart from the hook it was necessary to solder “half-circle”.

It is also bent separately and soldered  to the end of the block.

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IMG_8769.JPG

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The next step. Inserting the block into the shell of the block. Marking and drilling a hole for the “axis of a sheave”. After that - the shell is taken off and the profile of the shell is being formed, using the same mini-drill and broaching file.

The next step - making the axis of the sheaves from the wire 0,8mm, this is easy. After that blackening of the shell of the block and assembling.

I ve done it like that. I hope my explanation is comprehensible. If there are questions I’d be glad to help.

 

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