Jump to content

I always end up bending planks latteraly.


Recommended Posts

This is my third attempt at planking a hull. Let me admit up front, I was raised with a wrench in my hand, not a saw. First I did the Niagara. Trashed the hull. Clinking and like I say, I always have to push the next planks up against the previous. I already got a second keel and bulk heads thanks to model expo. I now have a third hull to ruin. What am I doing wrong? The bluenose is supposed to be easy.

 

I'm using Lauck's practicum.

latterly.jpg

Stealer.jpg

Edited by JustBlowingInTheWind
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Brian, if this is just first planking don't sweat it mate. Just sand, fill, sand again and move on. I guarantee that the second planking layer will be easier as you will have a nice smooth surface on which to lay them, plus the second planking layer is usually made from thinner and much more pliable timber than the first layer. Once you finish your model nobody will ever see or mention this first layer anyway.

 

Chris

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, JustBlowingInTheWind said:

What am I doing wrong?

It could be any number of things.

 

1. If you're starting at the keel, shaping the Garboard Strake (the first one that butts to the keel) is very important. It's different for every ship, and especially on bluff bowed ones with rounded hulls (18th century for example). The top edge (furthest from the keel) should be straight, shape the edge that butts against the keel. The forward end of this plank will finish with a sharp point - that's OK. All other planks should be no less than half their width at the narrowest point.

 

2. Bear in mind that there are virtually NO runs of planks that are a single width for most of their length (depending again on the shape of the hull - older ships have more taper than. say, Clippers). They will need tapering for a LOT more distance than you have been doing so far.

 

3. Don't attempt to lay a single plank the length of the hull. It's much easier to lay them in the correct scale length - between 20 and 30 scale feet. Kit bulkheads are usually too far apart to be too critical with these lengths, just go to the nearest one or add extra bulkheads or filler blocks in the bow and stern.

 

4. Start in the middle of the ship for each run. The planks usually don't need much of a taper in the middle, if any. Bend the plank over the top of the one already fitted to gauge how much will need to be removed from the BOTTOM edge until it gets to half-width. A Stealer will need to start from that point. Shape your plank and glue it in. Leave the stealer until you have fitted the next plank.

 

5. A good trick is to temporarily fit a plank about every 5 or 6 planks apart for the full length of the hull,without laterally bending them. Measure the distance between the TOPS of the planks at each bulkhead to see how much they will have to be tapered at that point. Mark the bulkheads, and divide the measurement by the number of planks to get the width of each one. If you hit the marks when you get that far you will know you're on track.

 

6. Thicker planks (0.6mm or more) will need to be edge-bevelled as they curve vertically to avoid gaps.

 

7. Always dry-fit each plank and reshape it until you are satisfied with the fit before reaching for the glue. If it's shaped and bent correctly you hardly need to clamp it other than to hold it flush to the bulkheads until the glue sets. It goes without saying that the bulkheads should be properly Faired before starting any planking.

 

Take a look at how I did the planking on my Norfolk Sloop to get some ideas. I do a "plank by plank" description in that build log, it won't apply to any other ship but the general method is the same.

 

:cheers:  Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On your home page go to more, then to  articles and databases go to framing and planking. Scroll down several pages and there are some good line drawings showing the lay of the planks to illustrate what Dan relayed.

 

What was relayed about appearance of first layer is very true its easy to put lipstick on a pig-filler-sanding-and voila a beautiful planked hull.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Brian, I know that Hunt's practicum for the Bluenose isn't spot on.  He wrote it, fairly enough, to the new modeler and took a lot of steps out of the build thinking the new modeler wouldn't want or need to do them or go into that much detail.  I too struggled with the planking but once I realized that the hull was painted I didn't sweat the details.  I planked as best as i could then added a bunch of filler to smooth everything out.  I haven't painted yet but once I do I think the hull will look fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, JustBlowingInTheWind said:

Yeah, I bought this boat because I understood it was an easy build and I want to learn planking specifically for future models.

Filler is your friend in this case but you will need to learn to spile planks for future builds. The best lesson I had was to build the hull of the Glad Tidings Pinky by Model Shipways. It has pre-spiled planks and really shows you how the planks are shaped to lay on the hull correctly. They are far from straight. Once you see how they need to be shaped you can carry it on to other models. Also, tick strips are really helpful so your planks don't get too thin at the bow. You'll get it once you see how the planks are shaped.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have another keel, bulk heads and some hard wood planks. I'll try again in a few days. I really care only about learning to plank so I'll likely toss this one aside. '

 

All the different opinions and ideas. Eventually I'm not going to do it SOME ONE's way, so please don't be offended if I do it wrong again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brian

 

I am not going to add to the 'Opinions and ideas' as not only is unnecessary but there is no way i am even qualified!

 

But I have come to the opinion over the years that if there are multiple suggestions on how to do something then there are multiple ways of doing something and that eventually you will come up with the way that WORKS FOR YOU. I am sure you will be able to find YOUR WAY.

 

I will be watching from the back corner as I do not want to learn any more naughty words than I already know. :huh:

 

Lou 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, JustBlowingInTheWind said:

Dan, I checked out your build. That's an incredible amount of shaping! Glad I don't have to do that.

Brian, if you thought the Norfolk Sloop had some tricky plank shaping .... check out the planking on my scratchbuilt HMS Vulture. It only has the one layer, all done in 1mm Castello and the inside was also visible, so I had to get it all right the first time :D. There are too many posts to give you a specific link to one that deals with only the hull planking, but HERE is a start.

 

Oh and by the way, the 1st planking on my first wooden model wasn't any better than yours. Once the "lightbulb" goes on you'll be OK with every model after. Keep at it, you'll get the hang of it :).

 

:cheers:  Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

    I applaude you idea to use a simple model as a training platform.  My first piece of advice is to add alcohol to your toolbox....rubbing alcohol.  (A good 12 year old scotch isn't bad either :cheers: (but I digress).  Alcohol helps soften wood glue and allows you to disassemebly your mistakes, er, ah learning experiences.  I have done alot of that.

 

    I would like to add to Dan's advise.  You will often have to bend planks, such as around the bow or edge bend up or down.  This often requires soaking thee plank and fitting it into place AFTER you have spiled it.  Let it dry in place and refit when dry.  If you glue while wet, it will shrink and cause gaps.:angry:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What if I live in a state where Mary Jane is legal? May I still consume a bloody mary?

 

Great advice. I don't understand why I'm having trouble at all, really. According ti Hunt's Lauck practicum, I should need but one stealer, no spiling.

 

I think I can see it now. I can see how spiling will reduce the urge to push up on a plank and bend it wrong. Can the width of a plank of bass wood be so inconsistent?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Basswood isn't an ideal wood for bending, etc. as it's rather stiff and I found it'll break easily.  I find pear works well.  One of the big keys is use wood with the grain as straight as possible.  And soak the wood well.  I also use an old curling iron to apply heat for bending.  Enough steam and heat and some woods can be tied into knots.  What the others have said applies.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, JustBlowingInTheWind said:

Do you think that many bulkheads makes it easier to fare?

They're actually called "Frames" Brian, and believe it or not the original ships had this many or more in larger ships. Fairing them is actually easier than doing kit bulkheads a lot further apart :).

 

:cheers:  Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Chuck Seiler said:

You will often have to bend planks, such as around the bow or edge bend up or down.  This often requires soaking thee plank and fitting it into place AFTER you have spiled it.  Let it dry in place and refit when dry.

Good advice. I actually OVER-bend the planks slightly in certain cases, as it's easier to push the middle of the plank onto the bulkheads (or frames) than the ends.

 

:cheers:  Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Dan Vadas said:

as it's easier to push the middle of the plank onto the

Now that I've done:) Not intentionally, but I learned from it.

 

Anything wrong with soaking and using a soldering iron? My wife straightens her hair.

 

For what it's worth to anyone else lurking about, I'm bi-polar. Concentration, focus and memory do not exist in my world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, JustBlowingInTheWind said:

Just looked at the Glad Tidings Pinky. $90. Can't be passed up. That's my next ship. I don't care how many it takes, I'm going to do a hull right. Single plank.

You'll get it. We have all wasted a couple of hulls, at least I know I have. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I, like you, have been struggling with planking the hull.  In my case, I have 3 hills in various degrees of poorly completed planking.  In my case, I am struggling to wrap my mind around how to do that clear tape thing (hasn't worked yet for me) and how to use proportional dividers.  I hate to scrap a hill that I put a lot of effort into detailing the interior, but I suspect that my ECB shall soon sink into the abyss, to be started once more from the beginning.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...