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KeithAug

Schooner Germania (Nova) by KeithAug - Scale 1:36 - 1908 / 2011

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Hi Keith

 

That's great, it's surprising how adaptable those tools are. 

 

To understand the use of the actual winch: if you were lowering the anchor, would someone be at the winch & using the brake lever manually to control the descent?

 

thanks

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Mark, the windlass on Waratah has gypsies for the anchor chain and similar brakes though the axis is on the horizontal, the brake is manually adjusted as the anchor is lowered so yes someone has to stand there and effect a controlled descent of the anchor 

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I have the impression that you are going more and more into detail during the manufacturing.  It is wonderful  to see how you are able to make all those beautiful deck components. When you started this project, was it your intention to go so far into realistic detail or did the elaboration grow during the build?
You surprise me with every post you make.

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I like that 'divide et impera'-method for the chain sprocket. When I was doing it for my current project, I messed around with a tiny spherical burr. Sometimes one just needs to think of a strategy at the right moment ...

 

Sherline doesn't do a compound vice. They only do a tilting table, on which their vice can be mounted.

 

As I don't have enough space under the head of my mill for a commercial compound vice, I made a simple tilting fixture for a 25 mm toolmaker's vice from some 25 mm x 25 mm aluminium bar. The crucial dimensions were milled in situ:

 

tilting-device-1.jpg

https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/tools/attachments/tilting-device-2.jpg

 

The angle is set using angle-templates between the surface of the vice and the spindle nose. I have a set in 5° steps. For other angles, one will need to mess around with a protractor.

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Kieth,

 

Your metal work is almost supernatural kudos. I read somewhere about human osmosis. From what I read we need to meet do a fist bump and your skills will be transferred to me by human altering osmosis.

 

Bad thing is my ineptitude in certain aspects of modeling may be transferred to you.

 

Good thought bad idea.:rolleyes:

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On 3/18/2020 at 10:25 PM, Bedford said:

what we call a gypsy

I didn't know the name Steve -  but now I do - thanks.

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On 3/18/2020 at 11:53 PM, dvm27 said:

I really like that compound vice Keith

Greg - you can get smallish versions but the mechanism means they do tend to be quite tall and possibly a bit too tall for a Sherline mill. The solution shown by Eberhard is probably the way to go.

On 3/19/2020 at 2:02 AM, Mark Pearse said:

would someone be at the winch & using the brake lever manually to control the descent?

Mark, I agree with Steve. On smaller yachts I tend to use my sea boot as a break but it is not very sensible on heavier chains.

 

On 3/19/2020 at 7:59 AM, G.L. said:

When you started this project, was it your intention to go so far into realistic detail

In general the answer is yes. In my mind eye bits are alway much bigger than they turn out. In consequence I find myself forced into details that are a bit more challenging than I envisaged at the outset.

 

On 3/19/2020 at 1:34 PM, John Allen said:

we need to meet do a fist bump and your skills

Hi John. Unfortunately as Keith says we all have to practice social distancing. Good think too as the bump might transfer some of my neurosis. 

 

Druxey, Michael, Richard thank you for your comments.

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Nothing much to do in the UK anymore - all entertainment closed down and restaurants and pubs shut. The only relief is shipbuilding, which isn't a bad thing.

 

I continued with the anchor winch.

 

The brackets for the hand wheels were finished by soldering on a mounting spigot.

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The anchor chain comes off the Gypsy and then passes through a 90 degree elbow before disappearing below deck. The elbows had been on my mind some time as to the best way to make them.

 

In the end I decided to make them out of .125" brass rod that was drilled to form a bore. I purposely left the wall section thick to prevent collapse of the tube.  From the sketch you can see the bend is tight given the rod diameter. I made a bending jig to assist with the forming of the bend and annealed the rod a couple of times during bending.

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It looked better after polishing.

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I then cut the elbow to height before turning a flange and spigot on another piece of .125" rod snd then joining the two parts with soft solder.

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The open end of the elbow has a flange. The elbow was turned to form a register for the flange. The flange was also turned.

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The flange was glued in place.

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The elbow was then mounted on to the winch base plate.

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I then mounted the hand wheel brackets and sorted out the hand wheel shaft. The .040" drill is providing temporory alignment. The chain was also installed.

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Many people probably don’t realise how much work has to go into even such unassuming parts in order to get them right. Well done again !

 

Lockdown or not, I would have spent a good deal of Saturday in the workshop anyway. But as parts get smaller, there is only a limited amount of time you can strain your eyes ...

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In this new self-isolating world, we ship model-makers are the lucky ones. We at least have somethign productive to do. Although a nice pint of draught....

 

Fabulous detail work as ever, Keith.

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Man-o-man you achieve some very nice detail into your metalwork.  I am still trying to figure how you did those flanges on the elbow (a bit of file work I am assuming?)

 

Works of art Keith!

 

cheers

 

Pat

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I have been away for a couple of weeks (focusing on other projects like having a house built, until everything - including my own company - came to a grinding halt), but the feast for the eyes (well, mine at least, as I can imagine some of the strain on yours sometimes ;) ) on returning is always so great !

 

Picking up my jaw, my chair, the popcorn and waiting for more :)

 

Hubert

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22 hours ago, wefalck said:

But as parts get smaller, there is only a limited amount of time you can strain your eyes ...

Thank you for your comments Eberhard. I agree small bits do take a disproportionate amount of time and eyestrain is a limiting factor. I must get more practiced in wearing a magnifying visor, to date i have always failed to master the technique.

 

21 hours ago, Retired guy said:

have been told I am bonkers for doing the small details

Yes Richard modelling can become a bit obsessive.

19 hours ago, BANYAN said:

I am still trying to figure how you did those flanges on the elbow (a bit of file work I am assuming?)

Pat - actually no filing involved - the following should explain:-

fullsizeoutput_2100.jpeg.44933e64ae314ebfb2e6d17c586a225c.jpeg

I first turned the diameters "A" on the rod to the upper right.

I then soldered on the elbow at point "B".

I then cut off the the upper right rod at point "C".

I then held the elbow in the lathe chuck using the shaft at "D".

Then I turned a diameter at "E" using a parting tool. This formed the spigot diameter "F".

I then parted off the elbow from the shaft.

The flange was then turned and fitted on the spigot.

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Keith's fabricating sequence shows that sometimes one has to break down parts not into their 'logical' components, but rather into what can be machined and how. In reality the flange would be on the elbow, but turning the flange onto the straight part is the only way to go. This can be quite counterintuitive.

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13 hours ago, Hubert Boillot said:

until everything - including my own company - came to a grinding halt),

Hubert - yes I think we are all going to be impacted for many months. Thank you for the compliment.

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I hope you are able to recover your Company after this awful  pandemic Hubert.

 

Thanks for explaining the detail and sequence Keith, makes sense once you explained it.  Thanks to Eberhard for the additional comment; yes not intuitive but logical  (starting to sound like a 'Vulcan' now; no pointy ears last time checked ;) )

 

cheers

 

Pat

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I remain confined to barracks and my guess is that the situation wont change for many months. Never the less I am spending less time in the workshop than I had hoped.

 

I continue to work in and around the anchor chain. From the winch the chain runs through a wooden guide as per the next image:-

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At some time after launch the guide was enhanced by the addition of hoops.

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Presumably without the hoops the chain was prone to jumping out of the slots.

 

I made the guides out of the same wood stock I had used for the deck planks. The guides were milled on either side of a block before being slit off using the Byrnes saw.

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Cut outs were then made to accept the hoops.

The hoops were made from thin sheet, cut into strips and then formed in a slot milled in oak, using a ball end milling cutter.

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I then went on to making the hand wheels for the winch brake. I didn't have any etched wheels of the right size and anyway for larger wheels photo etch parts lack realism. The brake wheels have an outer diameter of .320" a hub diameter of .092" and are of a 3 spoke design. Each spoke is .031" diameter and the wheel rim is .025" thick.

 

I started with a 12" long 3/32" rod and drilled an axial hole of .040" diameter and 3 radial holes of .031' diameter. I then put wires in the radial holes and soldered the assembly by applying solder to the central hole. 

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I then turned a bar of .320 outside diameter and .270 bore diameter to create a .025" wall. The hub rod was then mounted in the lathe and the ends of the 3 radial wires were rotated at speed and shortened with a file until they fitted neatly within the 0.270" bore. The larger rod was then placed back in the lathe chuck and hub rod was held in the tailstock chuck. With the spokes inserted in the bore the two parts were soldered together.

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The bore rod was then parted off and the central axial hole re-drilled to remove the solder. I then did a bit of cleaning up with a wire brush.

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Then back to the lathe to part off the hoop before finally inserting a shaft.

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The hand wheels were then installed on the winches.

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In the following shot the chain guides are not yet glued in position.

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When you finish this model Keith I am going to make a copy of the log and edit to my own needs as an exampler of how to do it right!  Many thanks for continuing to show your techniques in such great detail.

 

Oh, and probably no need to say, but exquisite detail. :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

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