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KORTES

Friech Boeir Yacht SPERWER by Kortes -1:30 scale

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12 hours ago, KORTES said:

Masttop.

I couldn’t find a Dutchman name, but it’s probably a weathervane.

 

 

 

Kortes,

 

The Dutch name is 'windvaan'.

 

Beautiful work, a real museumpiece!

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The mast is in the transportation position.

But this is just for the report, after the final assembling and installation of the rigging I 'm not planning on putting the mast in the transportation position, so this function will be left for the soul, so to say.

 

IMG_8172.JPG

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2 hours ago, KORTES said:

Carving, I tried to make a hawk.

You were very successful, beautifully done. What type of wood was used for the hawk? 

Edited by Keith Black

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Those are very nice birds!

 

I like your attention to the very small details.

just a question: you showed us a drawing in your fist post, but that drawing does not have this level of detail (at least not in the versions I know)

Where did you get all the additional detail: from an other drawing, or did you just eyeball those on the basis of pictures??

 

Jan

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    Kortes, you seem to have a very high level of skill in just about every phase of ship modeling with very limited tools and materials. You have a lot of ingenuity in using everything from paper clips and shoestrings to staples and rubber bands to clamp some very uniquely shaped parts.   At the same time, you seem able to convert everyday products like nails and plastic strips into just about any part that you need for your project.

      You remind me a lot of my paternal grandfather, who back in the Depression era of the 30’s, could make or modify his own tools, work with whatever materials were at hand, was self-taught in wood carving, and could turn it all into some unique pieces of sculpture, furniture, or in some cases both.  Here is just one case in point.  This was a mantle he made for his fireplace back in 1932 that I inherited from him and remounted as a support for a pass-thru countertop in our home.

100_5242.thumb.JPG.7425e8715bc1d54b49fc9dfc798332f9.JPG

100_5244.thumb.JPG.9574d5b75d5786ca10a45a68cd39bab2.JPG

    I, (and probably my grandfather if he was still around), would just like to salute you for your outstanding workmanship on this very unique and complex project of yours! :imNotWorthy:  I'm sure that many of our fellow MSW members would agree with me on that!

 

 

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The bird, as all the other decoration, was cut from the pear tree. Unfortunately, it's extremely difficult to find a boxtree in the region whre I live. 

I will be using the second version. The first one is a bit bigger than it has to be.

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20 hours ago, amateur said:

Those are very nice birds!

 

I like your attention to the very small details.

just a question: you showed us a drawing in your fist post, but that drawing does not have this level of detail (at least not in the versions I know)

Where did you get all the additional detail: from an other drawing, or did you just eyeball those on the basis of pictures??

 

Jan

I have found some more photos of this figurine in the internet,  taken from different angles, which i used as my guide, and, of course, the photos of the real hawks. 

 

608a6257b44.jpg

ястреб.jpg

корма1.jpg

1ястреб.jpg

ястреб.png

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18 hours ago, BETAQDAVE said:

    Kortes, you seem to have a very high level of skill in just about every phase of ship modeling with very limited tools and materials. You have a lot of ingenuity in using everything from paper clips and shoestrings to staples and rubber bands to clamp some very uniquely shaped parts.   At the same time, you seem able to convert everyday products like nails and plastic strips into just about any part that you need for your project.

      You remind me a lot of my paternal grandfather, who back in the Depression era of the 30’s, could make or modify his own tools, work with whatever materials were at hand, was self-taught in wood carving, and could turn it all into some unique pieces of sculpture, furniture, or in some cases both.  Here is just one case in point.  This was a mantle he made for his fireplace back in 1932 that I inherited from him and remounted as a support for a pass-thru countertop in our home.

100_5242.thumb.JPG.7425e8715bc1d54b49fc9dfc798332f9.JPG

100_5244.thumb.JPG.9574d5b75d5786ca10a45a68cd39bab2.JPG

    I, (and probably my grandfather if he was still around), would just like to salute you for your outstanding workmanship on this very unique and complex project of yours! :imNotWorthy:  I'm sure that many of our fellow MSW members would agree with me on that!

 

 

Dear Dave,

I'm very touched by Your words and such a high evaluation of my skills. The work of Your grandfather is a real masterpiece, work of the Master, I would  his hand with a profound respect. To my mind, its the best thing, when the works of our ancestors live in our homes, delight our eyes and the eyes of our guests, I think it's the best reward and the best  remembrance that any Master would wish for. 

In my turn I have to say that my father was an example for me, who had built a house, that i grew up in, with his own hands, mastered a lot of skills and professions, all of his works had an outstandingly high quality, and has left many paintings which decorate my home and homes of my relatives.

I think if we come in our skills just a bit closer to what our ancestors could do, it would be good.

My best regards.

 

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16 hours ago, michael mott said:

Kortes, Your workmanship continues to delight me and i have to agree with Dave's assessments of your skills.

 

Michael

Dear Michael,

It's a great pleasure to hear it from You.

My best regards.

 

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This is just incredible work!  Quite inspiring, both in terms of the quality of work, and the level of detail. Your ingenuity and creativity in methods and materials has taught me a great deal.

 

i have a rather generic question that I hope won’t derail the topic. I’m particularly impressed with your metal work, something that is a mystery to me. Some I can tell is formed from brass sheet and rod and soldered and filed to shape. Some appears to be cut from thicker sheet stock, perhaps by hand, and filed to shape. But some appears to be turned. I’m wondering how you learned your metal fabrication methods. Is there a good resource book that teaches techniques specifically for scale ship models? Perhaps particularly for the lathe?  

 

I had a Taig lathe a number of years ago but never did really learn how to use it and eventually sold it. 

Edited by Griphos

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It's a skill accumulated over years and through practice. I got myself books that were intended for trainees in metal-working - and then practiced ;)

 

As you are in the USA, Griphos, you may want to get hold of this book, written by Joe Martin (deceased), the former owner of Sherline: https://www.sherline.com/product/5301-tabletop-machining/. Although obviously talking a lot about the use of the Sherline products, it is good as an introduction to machining.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Griphos said:

This is just incredible work!

 This is museum stuff right here! And I'm not talking some little Podunk museum, I'm talking a "national" transportation museum. 

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