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Old Collingwood

Mosquito B Mk IV - Revell - My next non-ship project

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Good day all,  I reached a milestone today  after doing a bit more touch up and weathering  around the region of the  damaged decals  -

 

Mossie has her wings  attached.

 

Just a few more decals to be put on the  one  stab, then in a couple of days time I will  do a  mist coat over the troubled decal area, then followed up by a couple more layers.

 

OC.

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sorry I missed all the action............sad to see that happen OC.   I've had decals do that.......that's why I hardly ever coat them afterwards.  something about the decal film........perhaps not enough adhesive properties.  when the decals are movable on the paper,  I like to move them around a bit,  to insure they have sufficient adhesion.  the use of micro sol and micro set can take some away,  if too much is used.  one might never know the cause,  but it's a learning curve nonetheless.   hard to say if the use of paint pens might have helped you,  but I've done that in the past with reasonable results.  you did the right course of action.   glad to see you can move on from here.....and get this bird finished........hopefully Murphy free  ;) 

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1 hour ago, popeye the sailor said:

sorry I missed all the action............sad to see that happen OC.   I've had decals do that.......that's why I hardly ever coat them afterwards.  something about the decal film........perhaps not enough adhesive properties.  when the decals are movable on the paper,  I like to move them around a bit,  to insure they have sufficient adhesion.  the use of micro sol and micro set can take some away,  if too much is used.  one might never know the cause,  but it's a learning curve nonetheless.   hard to say if the use of paint pens might have helped you,  but I've done that in the past with reasonable results.  you did the right course of action.   glad to see you can move on from here.....and get this bird finished........hopefully Murphy free  ;) 

Thank you kindly Denis,    It has been a Huge learning curve for me  as its the first  (proper) attempt at building a half decent plane kit,   the construction stage never was a real issue  as the parts can be wiggled about and glued/filed/sanded where needed, it was the large area painting that has been the trouble, that and mixing  paint/top coat layers, and also not having as much control with rattle cans.

Will I learn for the next build or one after that  - "probably not"  as I have to use what I have and am limited  by my enviroment.

 

Still its all fun.

 

OC.

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Evening All,    in between  working on the Seafire  I found the time to check over mossie to see how the flat coats had gone  especially  over that troubled area we all know well,  then answer is  Fine,    no issues atb all the  top spray  put on in a couple of fine sprays did the job.

 

Here are two pics just showing  "that troubled area"  as it is now.

 

OC.

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Evening all. or shall I say  morning / afternoon to my friends,   so  after spending an afternoon in the back yard,   I decided to  work on the  bomb bay  parts still needed, I started by spraying the bomb bay doors - then put them away in the box to dry,   next  I put the Four 500Lb  HP  bombs together  inlcuding slimming down the rear fin area, they still need spraying Green  and having the Red and white rings  painted on.

 

OC.

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Good day all,   firstly   sincere thanks for all the likes and comments,    right  more progress  with the bomb bay area  -  I took a journey  for my Bombay Doors  and picked up a rather nice Ruby Murry  (only joking)    the doors needed  seperating down the middle, then the insides got a couple of layers of cockpit green  followed by the normal shading/highlighting  then a brush on top coat,   these were then glued in place.

 

OC.

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Nice work OC, it's good to see something go right for you on this build for a change.

 

I do not remember ever seeing porthole windows on any Mosquito bomb bay doors before. I assume they are for Photo recon aircraft where the cameras can be set up for photos. I have seen the porthole window in some crew hatches, but that seems not to be a 100% thing either.

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14 minutes ago, lmagna said:

Nice work OC, it's good to see something go right for you on this build for a change.

 

I do not remember ever seeing porthole windows on any Mosquito bomb bay doors before. I assume they are for Photo recon aircraft where the cameras can be set up for photos. I have seen the porthole window in some crew hatches, but that seems not to be a 100% thing either.

Thank you sincerley Lou,   I dont know the answer to be honest  (but I will go off and research it now you mentioned it)  perhaps they were a throw over  from both marks of mossie?

 

OC.

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So  Lou got me thinking and studying   and I came to a kind of conclusion  -  some of the Mossie's  were  combined  Pathfinder  and Bombers, perhaps they  kept cameras in the bom bays  and when changed over to bombing duties  - the  windows were retained but the cameras removed.

 

I found a pic on the net of a Bomber varient with  windows in the doors.

 

OC.

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Yep, cause of their speed they became multi role, (strike bombers and photo recon) aircraft very early in the war. They would fly so close to the ground on recon penetration missions that nap of the earth was considered excessive altitude.... (and one of the reasons pilots loved to fly them)

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2 minutes ago, Egilman said:

Yep, cause of their speed they became multi role, (strike bombers and photo recon) aircraft very early in the war. They would fly so close to the ground on recon penetration missions that nap of the earth was considered excessive altitude.... (and one of the reasons pilots loved to fly them)

Thanks EG.👍

 

OC.

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6 minutes ago, popeye the sailor said:

neat ........you made the repair look even better :)   nice progress too Oc........I think your closing in on the home stretch!  ;)    looks real good !

Thank you kindly  Denis, yep  props/spinners  to be attached  after they have had thier flat coat,  then  the entrance ladder  and  comms wire  between aerial  (still need to fit)   and a couple of  bits under the wing.

 

Oh - and the bombs need painting.

 

OC.

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