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Bob Blarney

Glasses for detail work (changed by mod)

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Hi,  now that I've reached a certain age, I find that presbyopia is becoming a nuisance when doing various kinds of fine work.  i saw these multi-focus reading glasses that might be just the thing for my problems.  Has anybody tried these, or will I be the first?  They don't look too expensive for what they may offer.

 

http://fostergrant.com/foster-grant-multifocus-reading-glasses/wes

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KeithAug   

Hello Bob

 

Several years ago i switched to optician prescribed vari-focal lens glasses. These are  made with the focal length is graduated from top to bottom of the lens. The bottom of the lens allowing for close up work and the top of the lens allowing for distance viewing. They work well once you get used to moving your head (rather than your eyes) to view near and far objects. Some people find this more difficult than others and some abandon vari-focals because of it.The ones you are looking at appear to be vary-focal glasses. That said eyes are complex things and its unlikely that you will get an off the shelf product that is a great match for your particular eye.

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Bob,

 

I tried on a pair of these eyeglasses at a Walgreens Pharmacy and found them to be better than any of my prescription eyeglasses.  I am constantly taking off my eyeglasses or looking over the lenses when I am looking at something that is not close to me.  With the Foster Grant glasses, I can see distant objects fine without having to take them off.  And the price is about 15% of what I paid for my current eyeglasses.

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AntonyUK   

Hi.

Ime 100% with Ryland above.

I have Foster Grant glasses for different jobs (focus length) but always keep them by there by there usage area.

Like fine modeling close up. Computer viewing. Ipad browsing.

The only exception is the machine shed ones are safety glasses.

5 pairs in all.

 

Regards Antony.

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Richvee   
Posted (edited)

As an optician,I have a little info for you guys to keep in mind. The foster grant readers with different diopter values will work well for some. Obviously, the higher the diopter power the closer the focal length, more magnification, and better for closer work. As you decrease the diopter value, the farther away from your eye the objects will be clear. The progressive,variable lens is the way to go if you can get used to them. It may take take some work, but remember, your eye is a group of muscles, so muscle memory needs to develop for you eyes to use the progressive lens effectively.

 

Maybe the most important thing to remember is, get a good eye exam. And MAKE SURE you explain to the doctor what you want your lenses to do. Tell the Dr you model and need to see very little items at very close distances. This makes all the difference, as the average exam will refract you for clear vision at far distances for driving, watching TV, etc, and an "addition" for reading vision at a distance of around 18". These "additions" are what is marked on those foster grants as +1.00, +2.50,etc.  For our modeling needs, we need to see clear at a closer distance than the average 18" used for your reading needs, and that requires a different Rx (Higher addition) . Your doctor might prescribe for you one Rx for hobby use, and another for everyday use. The key is telling him what you want to use the glasses for.

Edited by Richvee

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As an optician,I have a little info for you guys to keep in mind. The foster grant readers with different diopter values will work well for some. Obviously, the higher the diopter power the closer the focal length, more magnification, and better for closer work. As you decrease the diopter value, the farther away from your eye the objects will be clear. The progressive,variable lens is the way to go if you can get used to them. It may take take some work, but remember, your eye is a group of muscles, so muscle memory needs to develop for you eyes to use the progressive lens effectively.

 

Maybe the most important thing to remember is, get a good eye exam. And MAKE SURE you explain to the doctor what you want your lenses to do. Tell the Dr you model and need to see very little items at very close distances. This makes all the difference, as the average exam will refract you for clear vision at far distances for driving, watching TV, etc, and an "addition" for reading vision at a distance of around 18". These "additions" are what is marked on those foster grants as +1.00, +2.50,etc.  For our modeling needs, we need to see clear at a closer distance than the average 18" used for your reading needs, and that requires a different Rx (Higher addition) . Your doctor might prescribe for you one Rx for hobby use, and another for everyday use. The key is telling him what you want to use the glasses for.

Good Advice there.  If money is available, then it might be wise to order two pair - one for ordinary living, and one for modeling.  

 

Also for when I use power tools, I have some stick-on magnifiers for (semi-disposable) plastic safety goggles. When the goggles are finally scratched beyond usefulness, I can peel them off and put them on a new goggle.

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I wear glasses and yes, they help especially when you get my age and your eye sight starts waining a bit. Have you tried getting the adjustable head band with removable lens of different magnification? These are a god send to me.

 

 

mike

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I have an Optivisor and a couple of knockoffs, but the reading glasses are the most comfortable.

 

There is another little MacGyver that maybe I shouldn't mention, but I will.  My regular prescription eyeglass lenses meet the ANSI standards for impact shatter resistance, but they don't have any side or eyebrow protection.  So one time I modded a pair of laboratory safety specs that fit over the prescription glasses but that were very cloudy.  I put them on, stared at an object at my usual working distance, and then put a dot on the safety spec lens with a Sharpie, directly at my focused points of the visual field.  Then I drilled 3/8" holes through the clouded safety specs.  Then I could wear the glasses and peek through the holes to see what I was doing, and still had excellent eye protection.  Maybe it was a suboptimal solution, but it was far better than nothing.

Edited by Bob Blarney

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reklein   

I wear my reading glasses over the top of my regular glasses. The readers are a low oblong shape so I can see over the top of them to see normal objects like the football game.

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Kishmul   

Having told the optician what I needed glasses for, she prescribed a second pair specifically for model-making.

They are safety glasses to the appropriate standard and whilst not cheap they were not overly expensive as they are hardly a fashion item from a leading design house- unlike the Admiral's.

I got a nice holly log from a friend and let is season before mounting it on the lathe and turning to round. There was an almighty bang. There was a nail deep in the log which the bush had grown around.  Three stitches on my left temple and a nasty scratch on the right lens. Different angles and no glasses and I would not be typing this and model making would be over for me.

I am no rich man, but can stretch to a £200 kit. The glasses cost me £60.

We can all do the math.

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Or be like me and just remove the regular glasses entirely and hold the object closer.

Bit difficult when you're working on rigging detail on the model and yards prevent getting closer to the detail

 

B.E.

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CDW   

I tried those Foster Grant glasses at Walgreens and quickly put them down after learning they were selling for around $35. A quick check with Ebay and I found the same Foster Grant glasses for less than half ($16) and free shipping. So be sure to check Ebay if you want to save yourself some $$.

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Richvee   

Here's another little fact that may help someone out in a pinch. If you use the foster grant readers, or regular Rx reading glasses and you're still having a little trouble focusing on the close,small detail, slide the glasses down your nose a little...That essentially adds more magnification.(This will not work well with mutlifocals. Readers only)

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....I got a nice holly log from a friend and let is season before mounting it on the lathe and turning to round. There was an almighty bang. There was a nail deep in the log which the bush had grown around.  Three stitches on my left temple and a nasty scratch on the right lens. Different angles and no glasses and I would not be typing this and model making would be over for me.

I am no rich man, but can stretch to a £200 kit. The glasses cost me £60.

We can all do the math.

Yes indeed, the price of eyes is still out of sight!  

      When I'm roughing out a billet on the lathe, I wear a logger's mask & helmet until it's in the round.  But after reading your story, I think that at least a rudimentary metal detector might be in my future.

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Bit difficult when you're working on rigging detail on the model and yards prevent getting closer to the detail

 

B.E.

 

Nah it's still within my range of focus -  yards aren't a problem.

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