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Stuntflyer

The Hayling Hoy 1760 by Stuntflyer (Mike) - 1:48 scale

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Sweet work, Mike! Unless I'm mistaken you cut those steps on them mill...and finished with a chisel. Although it would be great if there was a way to make square corners on our mill. I'll bet Keith or Michael could figure out a way.

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That's right, Greg. I finished off the steps with a chisel while double checking that each step was in the correct position. After locking in the keel position with a small strip I found that a few steps were slightly off by a 1/2" more or less. I figured better to correct it now when I could do it off the building board.

 

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Work continues with the completion of the aft deadwood. 

 

15" stock was joined in three sections, doweled and milled to 12". This is necessary in order to produce the stepping line for the aft cants. The forward most stepping line is only 1" high or .020 actual.  I'm no mill man, but having one for this kind of work really helps.

 

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The bottom shape is approximated here as a starting point for determining the shape of the taper. I tapered it from the bearding line down. I later found that the rubber protectors that protect the wood while in the vise were creating a stain on the sides of the deadwood, especially the fore deadwood. Luckily this won't be visible later.

 

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Like the fore deadwood, adjustments were made to the stepping line for cant frame alignment.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Thank you druxey, Ed, aviaamator, bdgiantman2 and Thomas for the nice comments and for all the "Likes"

 

I managed to complete the rising wood over the past few days. It was made in two sections joined by a scarph joint. Most of the work was done on the mill with some minor adjustments done with needle files and miniature chisels. (http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=72391&cat=1,41504). I made sure that station line locations on the building board lined up with those same locations on the rising wood. When everything lined up perfectly, the space between station lines was then divided up evenly and transferred to the rising wood.

 

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Great start Mike. I will be following closely, not least because I live on Hayling Island. Still plenty of sail to be seen in Chichester and Langstone Harbours but regrettably no sightings of the Hayling Hoy in recent years! 

 

Greg

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The central spine is held down to the building board using four 6-32 bolts. These bolts will also be used for the pedestal stands later. Mortises must be made to recess the nuts below the rising wood surface. I made the mortises using the Dremel and a 1/32" engraving bit. I did the first mortise using a standard hex nut that I ground down. After that, I decided to look for a smaller nut from the many parts bins I had stored away. Luckily, I found some pressure fitting nuts. (When I was flying controline aerobatics these pressure fittings were often used to change the characteristic of the motor run, via pressure from the motor exhaust to the fuel tank). The brass nut you see here is much narrower and thinner than a standard one and no grinding is necessary. I used these on the three remaining holes.

 

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The nuts were adhered to the rising wood with epoxy after securing the keel to the board. A drop of oil was applied to the end of each bolt thread and the excess wiped off to prevent any possibility of accidental adhesion between the bolt and nut.

 

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The aft deadwood is bolted, but not permanently affixed to the keel'

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Mike

 

 

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Quick question Mike...Are you using boxwood for the parts you've made so far on this build?...and if so do you intend to continue with the same wood for the frames?  

 

I'm trying to get an understanding of which wood has what appearance on finished models....thanks in advance for the info...

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Cliff,

 

So far it's all boxwood and for the upcoming frames as well. It would be hard to tell the finished appearance from my photos. I will be applying W-O-P to protect the wood later on and that will change things a bit too. If you want me to send you a sample both ways, then pm me.

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Thank you for the quick reply Mike...one further clarifying question, it it Castello Boxwood or genuine boxwood?  The reason I am asking is I am looking at resawing some of my own lumber, and have access to some nice Castello Boxwood billets, and some marginal genuine boxwood boards....trying to figure out if anyone used genuine boxwood or is it just too difficult to find reasonable rough Genuine boxwood lumber?

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Hey Mike,  Do you have this great big pile of regects laying around that you just happen to forget about? Your work is always so clean and tight. It can't be the first effort every time. When I finally meet up with you I'm going to have to put you back in your place for the rest of us! Keep posting, I look for your posts first thing every day. I do secretly hate you, you know.

 

Kurt

 

 

You do set a high bar for the rest of us, but your days are numbered!

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Kurt,

 

That's very kind of you. Not only the rejects but the frustration in having to do things over. If I learn something from it and am happy with the result then it is all worthwhile.

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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re: boxwood. European boxwood (buxus sempervirens) is, when well seasoned, a bit harder. Castello (calycophyllum multiflorum) is not a true boxwood, but a South American specie.

Edited by druxey

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Hello Mike,

 

this looks like a really interesting building log and I will follow with great interest. You wrote in the first article, that the model based on a drawing of David Antscherl. I couldn't find a new book at Seawatch neither at the homepage. Where can I find more information?

Edited by AnobiumPunctatum

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Its been a while since my last post. This might be considered a small update, but it feels more like a milestone.

 

Before gluing the aft deadwood to the keel, I needed to add the inner post and sternpost to it and glue it down in one piece.

 

The 12" sternpost has a straight taper down from the top to 10" at the keel. I shimmed the bottom end up and milled a rabbet on both sides. Gudgeon strap scores were milled prior to tapering.

 

The 15" inner post has no taper. There is a score on each side for the "feet" of the fashion pieces. Due to the two fashion pieces having different dimensions, both scores are the same depth and width though not the same length. The aft side of the inner post, below the scores, needed to be reduced to a width equal to the space between the rabbets in the sternpost. Once that was done, more shaping of the bearding line was done to make the transition from the deadwood to the aft end of the inner post gradual.

 

After gluing the completed stern components to the keel, I added the aft support.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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In an earlier post I noted stains coming from the black rubber protectors I purchased for my small hobby vise. I tried removing them with alcohol, acetone and lacquer thinner with no luck at all. However, this product works great and does an excellent job on pencil marks too.

 

https://www.amazon.com/BADGER-16-606-Model-Airbrush-Cleaner/dp/B003976GKE

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Work continues with the making of the transom wing. The initial shape can be seen while sitting on the inner post.

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From here a curve on both sides needs to be created. The convex curve was done on the disc sander while handheld. For the concave curve, the wing was glued to a pine block with "Elmer's School Glue" and sanded with the spindle sander.

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After establishing the curve, a paper template was glued the the wing. Scores need to be cut for the counter timbers and cut-outs made for the first aft cant frames.

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Afterwards, the finished wing was glued and pinned to the inner post. Careful attention was given to insure proper alignment for both centering and the wings relationship to the building board.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Thanks for posting the details of your technique on this Mike.  I had been contemplating whether I needed to add a spindle sander to my "bag of tricks" in the shop...now the answer seems obvious and the only question is how soon I can get it and how to find room for it on the bench!  (although it will probably become a temporary bench tool with a base plate and storage on a shelving unit along with my small bandsaw, Brynes table saw, and similar bench tools...they all share the same temporary spot on my workbench when in use)

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I just finished reading through the whole build Mike. A beautiful clean bit of work so far, I am sure that the rest will not disappoint on that front.

 

On 8/15/2017 at 4:42 PM, clifforddward said:

.trying to figure out if anyone used genuine boxwood or is it just too difficult to find reasonable rough Genuine boxwood lumber?

Cliff if you can get some real Boxwood it is a real joy to work with. see here

 

Michael 

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