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Stuntflyer

The Hayling Hoy 1760 by Stuntflyer (Mike) - 1:48 scale

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Thanks guys!

 

You're absolutely right, Greg. . .

 

Before the Hayling build I had no chisel or milling experience so I came up with all kinds of excuses for not making a scored rising wood. A modeler friend cautioned me about POF models and cumulative error issues that can arise. With that in mind I purchased a mill to make the scores. Now that I'm installing frames I can see the advantage in having them.

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Snowy day here in NY. . Four more frames installed and the usual internal fairing resumes. More work is needed on the previously installed frames to account for the downward slope of the floor timbers and changing angles.

 

All of the frames are cut slightly wide of the drawings, both inside and out, leaving them quite rough looking. Toptimbers are made taller as well. Being my first POF build, I'm not taking any chances in making them too small. It means extra work in the fairing process, but better safe than sorry. Removing one of these would not be a fun. 11 more to go.

 

Rifflers are my go-to tool to start things off. Battens insure that things stay smooth. _DSC8187.thumb.jpg.312b4b9644e6e2f58a4bf2592528903d.jpg

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Happy New Year to all!

 

I finally reach a milestone over the holidays, though I still need to do some additional fairing on the inner hull. Once that's completed, I will move onto to installing the deck clamps. They will help to stabilize the hull in preparation for the exterior hull fairing. 

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_DSC8201.thumb.jpg.804bf3ee9967e22a1b2c5ff13860ee88.jpg

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Thank you all for your comments and "Likes"

 

My plan for fairing the frame floors. .

 

I started fairing the inner hull at the toptimbers which was easy enough. As I moved down toward the frame floors, I realized that I had to establish the height of each floor above the building board while getting the overall slope to match the shape of the keelson. To do this, I decided to make the three section keelson, using each section as a sanding block. Each section was left quite a bit higher so I would have something to hold onto. Sticky back sandpaper was adhered to the bottom face. So, after adding a number of frames, moving the block back and forth, in very short strokes, eventually brought the floors down to match the keelson shape. Floor heights were checked above the drawing board as sanding progressed.

 

Aft section test fit

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Moving ahead, I added the middle section of the keelson. Sandpaper was added to the middle section and five layers of blue masking tape added to the aft section which matched thickness of the sandpaper. Now I could sand down those frames forward of the aft section without affecting the work already done.

_DSC8207.thumb.jpg.bae191836e6592c5e25da032a0d57ce2.jpg

Sanding leaves shallow notches in the floors that are too high. _DSC8209_sfw.thumb.jpg.4ce1e55fb146fc38237cf2c469377d24.jpg

Test fit with two sections completed.

_DSC8210_sfw.thumb.jpg.91348b7f52ad22713698c5d1cf402d6d.jpg

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Coming along very nicely, despite what Kurt said. Those slight steps in the floors will disappear when you complete the final fairing. It's not an unusual thing to see at this stage.

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druxey: Some of those steps in the floors are more than slight. I don't mind the extra sanding if it insures that the frames are not cut too thin to begin with.

 

Kurt: A lot of these frames have glue squeezed out. I disc sanded one frame smooth and almost took off too much wood. So, I kinda gave up on that idea. Besides, I love sanding wood!

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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I don't really understand all of your explanations, but I do recognize outstanding workmanship.  And that you certainly have!

An amazing build - can't wait to see it.

Happy New Year.

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It's coming along nicely Mike.  I have some questions about the file(s) you use to fair the frames.  What are they?  Make? Style? Cut(s)? Where did you purchase it (them)?  Cost?

Thanks

Tom

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14 hours ago, KenW said:

I don't really understand all of your explanations. .

Happy New Year Ken,

 

I did a re-write of the post which I'm hoping will make things a bit clearer. 

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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The keelson has all three sections joined and sanded to shape, though not glued to the frames yet. I will need to drill holes for the bolts which will go through each floor timber and install the two upper deck clamps first.

_DSC8219.thumb.jpg.43c7950334eccb7277f55acfc0ae2116.jpg

The upper deck clamp is 4" thick (.083 actual). It is made in three sections joined by two scarph joints. The fore section had to be steam bent into shape. The other two sections were shaped with dry heat. The height of the clamp was carefully measured at several stations (frame locations) on the draught. Those measurements along with adjustments necessary to account for the beam heights were then transferred to the frames with the aid of a height gauge. I attached a piece of strip wood to the gauge that was thin enough to fit between the frames.

_DSC8216.thumb.jpg.7a27cc6e42868c46b348f06fa9c32ce0.jpg_DSC8215.thumb.jpg.28cab99d70e9cce0c537b94630ad64da.jpg

Looking at the these photos, it appears that the clamp is sloping downward as it turns inward near the transom. Before going into panic mode I decided to check this out for myself. I placed a batten along the top edge of the clamp while eyeing it from the rear of the ship. Turns out it's just an optical illusion. With the port side completed these frames are now quite strong compared to before. _DSC8222.thumb.jpg.940a27f1496fa5b7a716635974e2b903.jpg_DSC8221.thumb.jpg.0c67d8d77c77c724783c5930e20f463f.jpg

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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With the upper deck clamps completed I was able to install the keelson. Lengths of pine were pushed down by strips that I passed athwartships through the spaces between the frames, thus holding the keelson down tight to the floor timbers while the glue sets. With the keelson in place bolts were inserted and peened down tight into the floors timbers.

_DSC8224.thumb.jpg.d9cfa673ab1ecc217ec9ac2633df05a9.jpg

_DSC8226.thumb.jpg.5436e07a11d330bb3709437229bd6633.jpg

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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