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Stuntflyer

The Hayling Hoy 1760 by Stuntflyer (Mike) - 1:48 scale

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Thank you all for your comments and "Likes"

 

Continuing on with the stern framing requires that the fashion pieces be added. The feet of these pieces sit in the scores that were made earlier to the inner post. They are not the same shape since the one on the port side has a "timber loading port". A small filler piece was added to create the lower sill. Two vertical posts were added to define sides of the port. The angle where the pieces join the wing transom needed to be established and there was some beveling done on the inner face. I had fun making them!

 

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I left a generous amount of wood outside for the fairing later.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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With the the stern framing completed, I'm ready to work on the 7 aft cant frames.

 

They are all doubled with no scarph joints or chocks. Basically sections glued together with butt joints. To be safe, all of the sections are cut slightly past the line and double checked over the drawing before gluing them together. Here I have completed the assembly of aft cant No.1 (AC 1) port side.

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In order for it to line up properly, a score must be made on the aft side where it meets the wing transom. This is because it has not been faired yet and must be moved in a bit at the top. A bevel has been created where it will sit against the deadwood. My disc sander has an accurate adjustable table that makes this an easy process.

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Installing the frames was done with the aid of a 90° jig that was made from plywood. Clamps and a rubber band hold it securely in place.

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The score in the frame allows for the proper alignment with the drawing.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Thanks for the kind words, ken and for the "Likes"!

 

I now have four of the seven aft cants completed, though I'm still developing my preferred method of making them. Before moving onto the remaining three, I need to do a rough fairing inside the hull. There is a lot of wood to remove, especially on the two aft most cants. The outside of the hull will not be sanded or faired until all the framing is completed. Gonna be a while.

 

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Mike

 

Edited by Stuntflyer

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I have completed an internal rough fairing of the first four aft cants. Lots and lots of filing, sanding, etc. This before and after photo should show just how much wood needed to be removed. The structure is quite strong with AC 1 glued to the wing transom and small spacers glued between the toptimbers. This allowed me to use chisels and coarse riffler files without fear of breakage.

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Mike

 

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Frame making continues with the completion of the seven aft cants.

 

While fairing the last three aft cants, AC 5-7, it occurred to me that I had no idea as to where the stop line would be for the forward most one, AC 7. My solution was to use the square body frame just forward AC 7 for marking out a reference line to fair to. I tried making a few square body test frames a while back. Needless to say, improvements have been made and are on-going. I will explain how I make them when I start to produce them in quantity.

 

With the square body frame in place, a reference line is drawn slightly above its edge onto AC 7. If you look at the port side you can see just how much wood needs to be removed, including those frames previously faired.

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The square body frame has been removed and fairing can continue.

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With the starboard side fairing completed I can now place a batten anywhere and get a smooth run. It's probably too much finish work at this stage however, I don't mind the extra work as I find it quite enjoyable. Fairing a few frames at a time rather than all at once gives one a lot more room to work. My hand was outside the hull most of the time. Now its on to the port side. I see that I need to cut down that too tall toptimber on the port side too, Ooops!

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For this work I prefer using hard edge tools along with the Dremel rather than sandpaper

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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druxey,

 

I removed just enough wood to reach a faired state and not a bit more. Lower timberheads around 9" or 9 1/2". Timberhead tops between 7 1/2" and 9". I'm hoping that's good.

 

Mike

 

 

Edited by Stuntflyer

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The first of seven fore cants was made and installed. I was careful in making sure that it was vertical and at the correct angle to the keel. Rather than using my homemade 90° plywood jig, I now find it easier to align the cants with just two machinist squares and a little hand holding. The trick is to establish the exact angle needed at the foot of the cant and hold it down securely to the stepping line while the glue quickly sets.

 

Once the cant frame was installed I started to work on the Bollard timbers and hawse pieces. I ended up making three sets before I was satisfied with the shape and fit. Luckily, they don't require using a lot of wood.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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That's exquisite work, Mike! If it weren't for the grain it would be hard to tell the bollard and hawse timbers were from several pieces. I also use just two machinists squares when setting the frames. Much easier to reference the maximum height of breadth from the building board.

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The bollard timbers and hawse pieces are now completed. I left room for final fairing later on after all the frames are in. I didn't notice it earlier, but it appears that the upper limit of the air spaces should be shaped to a point and not square. Guess I will need to come up with a solution to achieve that and not do damage to any of the work already done.

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Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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