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gil middleton

HMS Victory by gil middleton - FINISHED - Caldercraft - 1:72

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Gil,

Amazing as usual. I am glad you are posting so many photos since your Victiory is too large and fragile to travel. Your log will become one of my textbooks when I do a period ship. Perhaps you can give us at PSSM a lesson in worming and serving. Thanks for showing us how this should be done.

Dave B

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Popeye, always a pleasure to hear from you. Steven and Colin, many thanks and good luck on your builds. And Kevin, thanks for answering Jerry's question.  My bulkheads went together in 2008 and I can't remember how easily they fit.  Thanks Dave. You'll notice I can't machine the tiny parts like you do so beautifully.  If we could combine our skills, it would be great fun.  Cheers, Gil

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Dear Friends,

 

Please permit me to introduce myself. I live close to Dr. Middleton and if memory serves me right, I MIGHT have been the person who made him aware of this forum several years ago, (correct me in private please, Gil) though I've never had anything of sufficient value to post here myself. He wasn't too much into computers if I remember correctly. I tend to drift from hobby to hobby and while starting this specific model several years ago after seeing his early stages I drifted on to other interests. Gil and I got together at my request a couple of weeks ago. As a former live aboard boater, I have never seen Gill's boat and asked to accompany him when he was going there to work. First we met at his home and I got to see his progress on Victory. When last I looked he was only just beyond coppering and hull paint. I tried to take some pictures on this visit and was so overwhelmed that I stopped. The ship detail is so spectacular that what does one photograph? You have all seen his build log, so just think about what I am saying - when you stand in front of it with a camera, where would you begin? It is a daunting proposition!

 

Gil's real boat is spectacular. He purchased it as he neared retirement and spent two years modifying it to the same level of perfection that you see in his work on Victory.  His 30,000 mile trip from Seattle through the Canal, up the East Coast, through the Erie Canal, down the Mississippi and back through the Canal to return to Seattle was never fleshed out for you of course in his personal autobiography. On the homeward side of the canal he had a transmission fail. Bear in mind that dear Gil is not a mechanic, yet he was carrying sufficient spare parts and documentation that he was able in two weeks at anchor to rebuild the transmission and continue home. That was about 12 years ago and it is still running fine. By the way, each of his engines is almost the size of a Volkswagen. Major improvements are underway by him on the boat at this moment.

 

Our time aboard was followed by lunch at the 1920 vintage Seattle Yacht Club where Gil has been essentially a lifetime member. The fish & chips lunch that we each enjoyed was delicious and the view grande. Imagine if you will the ambiance of a 90 year old club. The memorabilia scattered throughout on walls and overhead would warrant a visit unto themselves.

 

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe Gil has shared Cutty Sark or Constitution with you. They are equally detailed. I would not be stretching the point if I said SPECTACULAR. So it will not surprise you when I "let the cat out of the bag" and identify Gil .  .  .  .  doing so will flesh out the high caliber of his work and attention to detail.

 

Dr. Middleton is a highly esteemed, well established and widely known surgeon who specialized in reconstructive surgery of the hands and face. He dealt with those in the most serious instances of need. We are privileged to know him and share in his dedication to this hobby. Oh yes, at this point in time, it is probable he has enjoyed more birthdays than any reading this and I guarantee he is here with us forever. Especially so now to seek revenge on me for telling this to all of you, his admirers. We are all fortunate to know him and benefit from his skillful hands - the hands of a surgeon. No surprise, is it?

 

John Maguire

Bellevue

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John - I am so glad you shared this post with us. I too have known Gil for many years and yes I have seen all of his models. Even when he thought he was a beginner. I also appreciate that there are details here that I had never known. You should also mention the he and his wife live in a condo and she thinks he is turning it into a Nautical museum. And a fine one at that.

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Thank you, Gil, for rebuilding this log.  Your build is truly a treasure and to have lost it would have been a blow to our hobby.  I guess none of us should be surprised by what we read in Johns post, it is nice to have some of the details filled in.  My first recollection of your work was when you were working on Victorys gunport lids.  There was a side by side photograph of the model and the real ship.  I was amazed at the time that it was impossible to tell from the photo which was which, The level of precision and detail in the build is inspirational and I will continue to follow your work closely.  BTW, I have lifted your splicing technique - it gave me a heads that there was actually a way to do rigging work that looked authentic and was accurate.  I will continue to follow along here as you approach the completion of a very fine piece of work.

 

Withe great appreciation and respect,

Bob

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Thanks Gil for your invaluable log,as well as the little jigs you have invented and easier ways to do things you have also been about the only person to have understood  jotikas victory manual page by page,most us us me especially find some pages of manual mind boggling.Ha Ha i wonder how many unfinished Victorys there would be without your log.   DEREK     :cheers:

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 A magnificent build Gil that I followed on the old MSW. I am pleased to see it back. :)

 

Your Victory is an inspiration  to all builders and I have benefitted greatly from your approach to various aspects of the build. Your false splice is one that comes to mind.

 

Regards,

 

B.E.

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John and Floyd.  You had me worried. For a moment I thought I was reading my obituary. Judy deciided she may use it.  WHEN????.........

There is probably a rather thin line between persistance and obsession, but I'll leave that for others to decide. Thank you both for your kind remarks. What better fun than sharing our ideas among friends.

Bob, Your Bluenose is a work of art.  A friend of mine was project mgr. of the reconstruction of Bluenose II.  How close to the original is Bluenose II ?

Derek and BE:  Many thanks and nice to have company on building the Victory. I too wonder about the ratio of purchased kits versus completed models.

Cheers, Gil

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Gil,

You may be doing a "kit" but even us scratch types can learn something.  Thanks for sharing it.

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As always:  intriguing to watch, impeccable execution and stunning result :-)

 

And the most important: thank you for showing your know-how!!!

Liebe Grüße, Daniel

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Gil,

Thank you so much for posting these detailed photos!  I have referenced them often for assistance with my rebuild of a mid-1980's Sergal HMS Victory.  You have cleared up many confusing points for me and provided an excellent guide. 

Thanks,

Mark

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Gil,

 

   Please never stop posting. Any chance we could maybe see your other boats, the Cutty Shark and the Constitution? I would be honor if you could post a few pictures of them.

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Many thanks to each of you.  Popeye, how you can keep track of many build sites and still work on three or four models is beyond me. I admire all your projects.  And Mark, the "Licorne" is coming along beautifully. The closest I have come to scratch building is in the rigging where one starts with a dowel. Daniel, when I need a break, I go to your log and enjoy the marvelous innovations you've added at every stage.  And thanks Brian, David and Mark (gieb8688). I appreciate your comments, but I wouldn't rely too heavily on the "old geezer."  Joe, it was a stretch getting the build log back on line, and a lot of the thoughts from that time probably didn't make it.  Eventually, we'll get to the completed models.  Cheers, Gil

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Continuing with the yards and rigging.  Private e-mails before the crash have asked about how to obtain clean lines between colors.  Here, the stuns'l booms are painted black at the inboard and outboard ends.  The process here was sanding to shape the booms, water based stain (which raises the grain), sanding, applying clear flat acrylic to seal the wood, further raising the grain (without some sort of sealing, paint bleed under the masking tape), light sanding, a second coat of acrylic, masking with fine line 3M tape and painting black, two coats. post-68-0-87517600-1363239277.jpgpost-68-0-93833400-1363239336_thumb.jpg

 

Rigging the fore topmast yard.  Priciple references were McGowen, McKay, Longridge, JoTika plans and a few hundred photographs of HMS Victory.  However, one is challenged by the fact that captains, sailing masters and bos'n mates continually changed small aspects of the rigging, even underway. Hence, what you have presented here is my interpretation from several sources.  Some of you may well have a different take on the rigging.

Lifting block on the main topmast yard. Fore topmast lifting block stropped with served line.  One eye completed with a tail to lash the block to the yard. A second eye to be completed.post-68-0-21122800-1363240382_thumb.jpgpost-68-0-83833900-1363240411_thumb.jpgpost-68-0-83946400-1363240454_thumb.jpg

Fore topmast lift block ready to lash to the yard.post-68-0-08684300-1363240523_thumb.jpg

Above:  Main topmast yard.  Below:  Fore topmast yard rigged.post-68-0-55196400-1363240676_thumb.jpgpost-68-0-56939300-1363240713_thumb.jpgpost-68-0-39462400-1363240764_thumb.jpg

Fore topmast yard "pinned" to fore mast. fore topmast yard sheet and clue line block added.post-68-0-22017900-1363240878_thumb.jpgpost-68-0-16967100-1363240911_thumb.jpg

Clue line originates at lashing on yard, passes to clue line block and returns to block under yard.post-68-0-57167500-1363241037_thumb.jpg

Clue line continues from block on yard to block aft and under mast cap.post-68-0-60589000-1363241144_thumb.jpg

Clue line terminates at bitts aft of foremast.post-68-0-00402300-1363241217_thumb.jpg

Top mast yard sheet (larger block) and topping lift (smaller block).post-68-0-98958800-1363241295_thumb.jpg

Port yard tie originates at topmast top.post-68-0-90537700-1363241377_thumb.jpgpost-68-0-76633800-1363241407_thumb.jpg

Tie extends to lift block (center of yard) and up to starboard block (on a pennant).post-68-0-91964000-1363241518_thumb.jpg And then extendstowards the deck to a tackle.post-68-0-01692400-1363241635_thumb.jpg

Tie extends to tackle secured at aft end of fore channel.post-68-0-26842500-1363241712_thumb.jpg

Termination of port tie tacklepost-68-0-79579800-1363241775_thumb.jpg

Tackle line secures at kevel opposite the mast.post-68-0-59792700-1363241850_thumb.jpg

Starboard topmast yard tie is exact opposite, terminating on the port side.post-68-0-43771500-1363241959_thumb.jpgpost-68-0-98616200-1363241987_thumb.jpg

Tackle for ties seen aft of fore top.post-68-0-30246000-1363242054_thumb.jpg

Topping lift originating at topmast cap.post-68-0-24963700-1363242110_thumb.jpgpost-68-0-44067200-1363242137_thumb.jpg

Topping lift through block at end of yard.post-68-0-47661400-1363242206_thumb.jpg

Topping lift through lower sister block (in shrouds), then down to shroud cleats.post-68-0-91718100-1363242296_thumb.jpg

Yard ties, yard sheets, clue lines and topping lifts rigged.  Braces deferred to allow better access for main topmast yard.  Parral to be added later. Bunt lines and leach lines to be added later.

post-68-0-28187800-1363242602_thumb.jpg

post-68-0-92187800-1363242621_thumb.jpg

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you forgot to mention the build logs that I write on online blog sites as well Gil. :)   I have one for every build I do.........but even that,  the sites that I belong to,  as well as the builds I do.......I could never be able to match the knowledge,  craftsmanship,  and workmanship that you put into your build......It's absolutely beautiful!  your level sir,  is a mountain that I have yet to climb......kind of like what scrooge said to the third spectre......"I fear it the most".  to do that { I see this in a modeler's perspective},  I would have to put myself "into" the model.....something I fail to do at this time.  I see that in your build and more ;)   something I said a while ago that I can apply to you  "model manufacturers give kits substance,,,,,,you give them life!"

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Great work Gil, and great explanations as well. Will be a real bonus of help for me as I come along hot on your heels!

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Gil - brilliant work, 

 

are you fitting the stun yards? I presume these would involve a certain amount of rigging as well

 

i am on track to have my build on the table by Easter

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Thanks Mark for you kind comments. From the look of your Wasa and Sloop of War, it could be "been there, done that." But we do have fun, don't we?

Joe, I picked up ideas from Ed Tosti's remarkable scratch built Victory and the Victory Gallery on the old site.  It's great that someone is watching the build logs and we can continue to pass on ideas.

Popeye, Your thoughtful remarks are greatly appreciated.  I think all of us who enjoyed the O'Brien series, imagine ourselves as captain of the ships (models) we build. The reality, however, is that without family wealth, I'd have likely been a tar, living "before the mast" and climbing the rat lines. So....I want the rigging to be safe.

Grant, You'll soon pass me by.  I'm spending much more time working on the real boat now.

Kevin, I think you will find the stuns'l booms in place in the last two photos.  Rigging lines for them is in question.  Sometimes, I think we can add so much detail that the beauty and order of the rigging can be lost, rather like background noise in a recording. Perhaps I'll make that decision when I get a bit further along.  Looking forward to "visiting" your work station in April/May.  Cheers, Gil

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Great work Gil

The photos with identification to which lines are very helpful, I only finshed my Pegasus a few weeks ago and at the start of rigging her I would have found these great, keep up the superb build and infomation.

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Gil - I also notice the stunsil boom irons. did you amke them or were thye supplied? I am think of adding this to my Harvey once I get there. by the way my wife thanks you for the pictures. She is sorry the Victory will no longer travel to our house.

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Many thanks Ray and Frank.  Ray, you certainly did a beautiful job rigging the "Pegasus."  I agree that adding any more lines or coils would probably be a distraction. Rigging is my favorite part of modelling, however, your exquisite decks on the "Diana" are beyond me. Nice photo, at the helm.  What ship/boat are you steering. Mine is our boat in Prince William Sound, Alaska, among the ice bergs.

Floyd, the stuns'l boom irons were supplied but I thought they were too large.  I cut the rings from styrene tubing (page 4 shows the supplied rings along side those from the tubing.  On the fore and main lower yards, I used 7/32 " (5.5mm) tubing, while on the fore and main topsail yards, I used 3/16 " (4.8mm) tubing. Tell Carol that we'll have a launching party in the not too distant future.

Cheers, Gil

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I will tell her and we will be there! Great chance to see your other models too! it has been at least 5 yrs since I last saw them. You know that between you and Harvey she wants me to work on a copper bottom model soon.

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Thanks Michael.  It does take some time, but it helps to be retired.  However, with a real boat, a model ship, raquet sports, grandkids, etc. there is never enough time.   But it's better and more fun than sitting in a rocking chair.  Don't worry that you've a long way to go. You know better than most that doing something well is a worthy goal.  Cheers, Gil

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