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michael mott

Bristol Pilot Cutter by michael mott - 1/8 scale (POF)

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Very nice work michael, this will result in a authentic looking paneling.  Will that card be prone to 'swelling' in the water environment?  I am sure you have thought of that and will be interested to see how you seal it, particularly the edges.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Michael; agree with all the above. I love the ladder...I've made many of them and for whatever reason none of them looked very good...Moab

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Seven, Keith, Pat, Steve, Moab, and Druxey Thank you all for your kind remarks. Also a thank you for all those who are following along and using the like button.

 

Pat the water will not be a problem because the interior has to be removable in order to place the lead sailing ballast it needs over a 100 lbs to get down to the waterline. At first I was not going to add an interior but I reconsidered it because it will be on display more that in the water.

The yellow cedar is such a lovely wood to work with for this small joinery paneling with a sharp low angle block plane in my simple thickness planing jig I can get a lot of control. Using it along with the shooting board is making this work really a pleasure. The way the thickness jig works allows me to thickness very shot pieces without any difficulty.

 

IMG_8707x1024.jpg.8e37360f4f74cc0917aea6f34e1629ed.jpg

The lower panels have a sloped dado al around so I set up an angled fence on the big table saw 12.5 degrees this way I was able to use a new zero clearance insert (I flipped around the insert for the 8 inch 200 tooth slitting saw blade that I use mostly for brass the holes help to keep the blade cool) I did not want to angle the saw blade.

 

IMG_8698x1024.thumb.jpg.78c861b417d56355c17d7ae02f0a2aae.jpg

it was a simple one pass around the edges to create the dado bevel

 

IMG_8699x1024.jpg.1d3af18dac9f5602ee73c97cf727998a.jpg

I put them back into the thickness planing fixture with a piece of copy paper underneath the wood to raise it up a couple of thou and gave it a single pass to clean them up.

 

IMG_8705x1024.jpg.0eeb650490709fe66aa5ffe6575a5603.jpg

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Both side are getting close to being ready for the final gluing, I did not want to do any sanding on any of these pieces of wood so keeping it all absolutely clean is going to be a challenge before the tung oil is applied once they are glued up. I wanted to get the two side panels done first because the end once are a little more complicated because of the angles involved.

 

IMG_8704x1024.jpg.9ba29341838d5571273687f965e24aaa.jpg

There is a small element that surrounds each panel that I am going to add it is about a 1/32 by 1/16 actual size with a rounded ogee type profile, The upper panels are flat but thinner than the stiles and rails, still a ways to go yet before it all gets glued up.

 

Michael 

 

 

 

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Hi Michael

 

that's very clever work with the table saw, thanks - and and very nice result. I don't know the timber, but it does look lovely.

 

For the thicknesser, do you replace the aluminium guides on the sides to adjust the thickness?

 

all the best

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Mark, the stips inside the thickness jig are 3/16 (4.762mm)  x 1/8 (3.175mm) strips of evergreen styrene they are outside the edges of the blade the cross end stop is about .1" (2.54mm) so I can flip them up to work with thicker wood or change them for 3/16 x 1/4 (6.3mm) the blade is of course also adjustable. I find the easiest way though is to add a known thickness of paper under the wood to reduce the thickness. as soon as the edges of the plane ride on the plastic it stops cutting I am able to work with very small pieces of wood that I could not put through a regular thickness planer. I do not like sanding soft woods no matter how fine the grit it is just that grit. A sharp blade leaves a sheen because the fibres of the wood have been sheared not scraped with chunks of rock. the other advantage is there is virtually no dust. I have both of the Veritas (Lee Valley) low angle block planes one is 12 degrees and the other is 20 degrees with the adjustable throats. short pieces can also very quickly be reduced in width on the shooting board with a right angle fence (sheet of 1/8 thick styrene by 3" x 4" I will add a picture of this in the next post. 

The Yellow Cedar is also called Yellow Cyprus the colour is a little lighter than Castelo but much softer and easy to work. The local hardwood supplier has a good supply of the cedar and occasionally can have the Castelo. I can get a 2" x 6" plank of yellow Cedar 6 feet long for around $45 so it is also considerably less expensive than the Castelo.

 

Michael   

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Hi Keith I set up the fence like this

212901760_bevelfencediagram.thumb.jpg.ccf246ef216b835befad6500c1a15e43.jpg

 

Here is a shot of the shooting board being used to reduce the width of the rails

IMG_8710x1024.thumb.jpg.97262dfc156048216558e7179a2e1f68.jpg

 

IMG_8711x1024.thumb.jpg.a71ec248456f5d1e0feb361cac88bc3f.jpg

I planed some cedar to .060" and used a scraping tool to put a reveal along the edge 

 

IMG_8713x1024.jpg.9e182a1859e9bf48d26d0c7c0fb30ebc.jpg

 

Then parted it off with the exacto knife

 

IMG_8714x1024.jpg.54e069d4fcec097d9809e1c1a3e36a3d.jpg

Used the shooting board to reduce the width to .162"

 

 

IMG_8715x1024.jpg.22154652394aac2ef71c5ac26de4a8fd.jpg

 

The small inserts will work fine I think.

 

 

IMG_8722x1024.jpg.1cc7e0c22a7f51b67cc3a561a912b380.jpg

I will need to shorten the panel for the end inserts, I will make enough long ones first.

 

Michael

 

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Michael; it’s an absolute joy to follow your builds. Your explanations are so easy to understand and the photos display the work perfectly. Thank you for sharing your craft with us...Moab

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Well that was a disaster!

All was looking well until I began gluing things together which was filly to say the least. I have a whole new respect for all those deck beams that I see in some of the amazing builds.

 getting ready to glue.

IMG_8729x1024.jpg.6854572dae0d29a32f88dda8611d1d2b.jpg

I had to pull it all apart because the substrate (card) began to warp and it looked terrible so I will need to rethink this.

 

IMG_8730x1024.jpg.8ba88d66672c0d6b859e5fa843b0c059.jpg

Time to go have some breakfast and heal my ego.

 

Michael

 

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Perhaps you should have had breakfast first ... I am terrible without breakfast ...

 

I gather you used PVA glue ? That will swell the paper. I can think of two solutions, either take something very thin as backing, such as silk-span, or to use a non-waterbased lacquer/glue for the purpose. If the panelling is to be varnished without dyeing, you may want to apply sanding filler on the 'good' side first to avoid uneven spotting while the parts are glued together. The sanding filler can also be used to stick the panels to the paper backing. Once dry turn the whole thing around and give it good coating with the filler from the back, that should result in a pretty solid assembly.

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If using ply, the 'sandwich' needs to be a balanced one with an equal number of layers each side of the central core. If it isn't, it will warp. That's why veneered pieces always have a counter-veneer on the opposite side.

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I determined that the higher powers did not like me "cheating" so I have started over with some maple and will build it properly with dados and inset panels and half lapped joints no backing sheet. I am working on preparing the base material from some 40 year old air dried rock maple.

 

Michael

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Ouch!  I’m surprised the backing sheet method didn’t work out as it seemed like a solid approach.  The maple will certainly be beautiful and at least the design is already worked out.

 

On 1/12/2020 at 11:27 AM, michael mott said:

do not like sanding soft woods no matter how fine the grit it is just that grit

I agree.  A few years back I bought a set of cabinet scrapers and the finish from them is so clean and the wood seems to have added depth.

 

On 1/10/2020 at 10:30 PM, michael mott said:

The upper panels are cabinets that will have opening doors with the dining stuff inside

If you make a 1:8 sterling silver tea set - I’m going to throw away all my modeling stuff.

 

Beautiful work Michael and a great build log.

 

Gary

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4 hours ago, FriedClams said:

If you make a 1:8 sterling silver tea set - I’m going to throw away all my modeling stuff.

Made me laugh out loud, its a good job I didn't have a mouthful of tea.

 

So the afternoon was much better. In 1976 I acquired a log of rock maple, one of the students when I was working as a technician in the sculpture lab at the U of A asked me if i wanted some maple, because his grandfather was cutting down some big Maple trees in Nova Scotia, I said sure, and didn't think much more about it. a couple of months later I got a call from Canadian National Railways freight Dept telling me that there was some wood on the loading dock and could I please pick it up. There was this 6 foot length of 24 inch diameter rock maple Green standing upright. I had to pay $360 to take it away. I had it laying around for a couple of years eventually moving to the back of a workshop I was renting in 1978 where it sat in the rain and snow for another year. then I chainsawed a slab out of the center about 3 inches thick to make a coffee table, planing it "flat" after the chainsaw was a task that took a couple of days of concerted effort. it sat on a couple of rocks for a few years, then My son took the top to Victoria BC and sat it on a couple of round stumps, then a few years ago gave it back to me when he moved to Whitehorse Yukon. 

Because I was going to move back to the city I wanted to give it a "better" support structure, so settled on some bits of Mahogany and Ash, it turned out well enough.

 

IMG_8757x1024.jpg.6531219b2fd7608dd8284d71f79611dc.jpg

So back to the Maple the rest of it was cut up into some 2 inch and 3 inch sort of quarter sawn slabs, that i put up in the rafters of the shop. A fair bit of the wood had some spalted areas that were cut up into 1/4 inch veneers and I have been using it for odds and ends ever since.

 

today I chose a nice block that would be enough to make all the new paneling and using the bench planes Bandsaw and table saw  prepped all the materials.

 

squaring up two side of the blocks

 

IMG_8735x1024.thumb.jpg.ac7bed83fe08267f0248319cf8767aaa.jpg

Slabbing off on the the bandsaw.

 

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Next the planed side pieces that were going to be used for the rails were dado-ed for the stiles

 

IMG_8738x1024.thumb.jpg.bb1bd5a6e3b5747f2c1ed41a1a2c5d0b.jpg 

These parts were then cut lengthwise and the same was done to the pieces that were going to be the stiles

IMG_8739x1024.thumb.jpg.79f3f4666f73039022bedccf3075f0e1.jpg

this gave me the basic structure all half lapped together.

IMG_8741x1024.thumb.jpg.02701501e2c600abf660d653670b24ef.jpg

The rails and stiles were then given a small dado groove  lengthwise so that the panels could slide in.

IMG_8747x1024.thumb.jpg.de029d59dc3cb07fab22be99c334ddac.jpg

The next shot shows all the parts The top panels will get glued together then the two outside panels will get the dado groove and some spline material will hold them into the groves in the rails and stiles.

 

IMG_8751x1024.jpg.c7f374cf8e0adda4e8c76bb4e1f7c025.jpg

Now I was able to take them into the model shop I am thinking about the reveal on the top panels i think I am going to keep it more simple and not so busy. you can see some of the black spalting on the left panel insert The three bottom panels were slid up into the framework before the bottom rail is placed.

 

IMG_8753x1024.jpg.63867f4f96f63afa60000d0c34979e8a.jpg

 

And here it is freestanding with no glue yet. I should have done it properly in the first place, but thought it would be easier the other way. One lives and learns.

 

IMG_8754x1024.jpg.26665b4c81cecfad55a740448df0ba5e.jpg

 

I am hoping to get these finished off tomorrow.

 

Michael

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nice joinery work. It usually pays off to do things prototype-way, scale permitting, of course. Years ago I picked up this book on a flea-market and found it very help in understanding how things were done and what the typical dimensions of the parts may be:

 

DUCKWORTH, P.G. (1923): Ship Joinery. The Woodwork Fittings of a Modern Steel Vessel.- 215 p., London (G. Routledge & Sons Ltd.).

 

"Sterling silver tea-sets" on a pilot-boat ? I don't think the guys were that rich ! It was more likely some white and blue emaille, like this (in 1:90 scale):

 

https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/models/botter/BotterModel/BotterModel-175.jpg

 

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Very nice joinery Michael; the wood is an excellent choice.  Now I have about a dozen doors in the house if you wouldn't mind ;) :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

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12 hours ago, BANYAN said:

Now I have about a dozen doors in the house if you wouldn't mind ;) 

Sorry Pat, I have my own "honey do list"

 

Working on the little hinges for the doors the sequence is as follows. The .005" brass strip was bent to a right angle with a set of pliers

Capture8771.JPG.3ce394737a44564153967a3ddbd2420c.JPG

then folded over with my fingers

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then snipped off with the scissors

Capture8773.JPG.91b27c33d56f07d65ee58911b659dc04.JPG

Slipped over the .025" steel rod , the right angle bend in the rod made it easier to handle and also for twisting the rod in and out of the hinge

Capture8774.JPG.80dfb60a43088bb728cfa0755b610606.JPG

the folded brass was then lined up so that as the jaws of the vice closed they squeezed the brass tightly around the rod this took a bit of practice 

Capture8775.JPG.6e8b8b7d76a01848caef43e3dd27f804.JPG

some of the pieces actually sheared off one of the side making it exactly the way the full size hinges look but they will get used for something else later, I wanted the folded one that were full

Capture8778.JPG.5fc36e21392a20d28e6d4994efd9fb32.JPG

 then cut 4 that were scale 2 inches (1/4") these were slipped onto the short leg of the rod to make lining the brass up in the side of the vice to file the edges even, with a # 8 cut jewelers file

Capture8779.JPG.63b3983f62cc6585273d57032ab3c505.JPG

filed the slots with the same file

Capture8785.JPG.6695dbc16d408cb24b1fa4d6c0135c87.JPG

added the pin

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I used the thickness jig with some spacers to hold the rails and stiles upright in order to plane down the fillers in them because after deciding to make all the top panels opening I did not need them and it would have been difficult pinning the hinges into place. i really like using this jig it has become a very useful addition to my tooling. 

IMG_8776x1024.jpg.37c911af834fe88efdaa6794118f8bd6.jpg

marked the holes to be offset from each other and used a 1/16th end mill to cut the  recess for the hinge on the stile

Capture8793.JPG.ef1901e1b83b85ffea0172bfa7f6f506.JPG

used the simplest of ways to hold the hinge on a waste piece of maple to drill the .030" holes. some magic tape with a little help from my fingers, it worked surprisingly well

Capture8794.JPG.41eb0bd1cb0789527b20a1f0b1b11f2f.JPG

this shot shows the hinge positioned to mark the stile and door for the hinge recess it is all just loose fitted so that I can take it apart to cut the recesses.

Capture8970.JPG.060b0b09cd43b38edd51d728ce558917.JPG

 

Michael

 

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I guess in addition to your other specialties we should call you “hinge man.”     Does your honey do list get longer because your wonderful work gives your wife ideas?...Moab

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Oh well, I tried ;) 

 

More nice work; very effective faux-screws Michael - look the real thing!

 

cheers

 

Pat

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