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michael mott

Bristol Pilot Cutter by michael mott - 1/8 scale (POF)

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A cheaper (but not cheap) way to slot tiny screw heads is using a watchmaker's screw slotting file. I've a selection of these, and they are very useful for other purposes as well, such as cutting fine profiles in scale scratch molding tools.

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It's inspiring to see the level of detail you include in work that is essentially hidden. Imagine the delight of some distant heir cleaning the model in 100 years and discovering that the hinges actually work and what is inside. Perhaps the perfect place to secrete a hidden message?

 

Happy New Year Micheal. We all look forward to your updates!

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Druxey, and Greg thanks for your comments.

1 hour ago, dvm27 said:

Imagine the delight of some distant heir cleaning the model in 100 years and discovering that the hinges actually work and what is inside.

Greg the next area that I am going to work on is in fact the companionway and the interior that can be viewed from the hatch and the skylight. The larger raised area of the deck that the companionway and skylight are fitted to is removable as a unit, so my thought is to model a minimum interior that will include the stair /ladder to the interior into the first area that will detail what can be seen.this whole section will be able to be lifted out in order to place the lead weight into the bottom for the sailing one all the other elements are completed. This will enable some fun surprises inside the cabin which I have not thought about yet. Perhaps for instance a small gimbal stove for making tea. 

I particularly like the interior of Stirling and Sons Integrity

and this one

Michael

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Lovely work Michael and very inspiring! Did not know that shim sizes of brass sheet existed. Great work on the hinges, I now regret missing the opportunity of making working hatches and companionway for the Deben. 

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On to proof of concept for the interior of the cabin, first I needed to understand the parameters of how to make the interior be able to be removed through the narrow opening sort of the reverse of the ship in a bottle.  The expanse of the cabin has to collapse toward the centre so that the components are able to be pulled up through the main opening once the top deck is lifted off.

Using some old green file divider cards I cut the panels to give the interior some maximal limits of what can fit through the opening, the bottom the panels represent the floor level.

 

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Next I had to tape the panels together so that they would sit inside the opening without the clamps. so that I could place the top deck into position. in order to locate the companionway ladder to the interior.

 

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Next the cabin hatchway was placed in position to check the realistic feasibility of a person using the ladder (clearance wise)

 

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Then a shaky view from inside looking toward the ladder holding the iPhone inside and hoping that it would produce an acceptable impression.

looking aft

 

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and forward I can see the shadows of the bars across the skylight windows

 

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apologies for the out of focus pics but like all of this project it will improve with practice and methodology.

 

Michael

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Looks a good fit Michael; once you have the ladder sorted you will be in a good position to determine how the other gear/furniture will fit..

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Pat and Druxey thanks. and thank you to all of you who added the likes, I really do find them supportive and encouraging.

Now that the proof of concept has been sorted it was time to begin with the base structure, I chose some 6 inch by 1 inch  clear fir boards for the cabin floor these were thicknessed on the small hand thicknessing jig.

first the flat side

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then the edges, I used some spacers and a wedge to hold the boards upright to clean up the edges

 

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and with one of the miniature planes for scale.

 

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The floors boards were cleated  on the underside with some 4 x 1.5 inch cross beams

 

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for the forward vertical support wall (bulkhead) I planed up a bit of Western Red Cedar that had a nice tight grain, a bit of careful planing to match the width of the opening and ensuring that all was square before gluing it all together.

 

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I glued the main elements together oyt of the hull because it is just so much easier.

 

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The horizontal boards are 10 1/2 inches by 1 1/2 inches. thin after the glue was set I dropped it back into the hull to set up the aft piece of floor that the ladder lands on.

 

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The aft section of floor is nine inches higher than the main floor. Once it is set up I can begin to work out the elements that fit onto the sides it reminds me of the pull outs on the modern RV's

 

Michael

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello, Michael,

you show excellent work with wood. You might think this is the construction of a ship on a scale of 1:1. 
I also admire your clean and accurate processing of the materials.
Is that the model of a railway in the background?

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6 hours ago, archjofo said:

Hello, Michael,

you show excellent work with wood. You might think this is the construction of a ship on a scale of 1:1. 
I also admire your clean and accurate processing of the materials.
Is that the model of a railway in the background?

Hi Johann thanks for kind words. Yes the model in the background is a 3 1/2 inch gauge live steam locomotive that i have been working on slowly for a few years.

 

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Steam engines are one of my other passions so as my energy waxes and wanes in each type of model I keep busy and enthusiastic in the workshop.

 

Michael

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3 hours ago, michael mott said:

Hi Johann thanks for kind words. Yes the model in the background is a 3 1/2 inch gauge live steam locomotive that i have been working on slowly for a few years.

Michael is it based on an actual engine? 

 

Nice work on the interior - I will be interested to find out what the end game looks like.

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I love these little 0-4-0 engines, but don't like the British saddle-tanks too much, they look bizarre by continental European aesthetics. What's your's going to be ? I have started to collect some material on the French Corpet-Louvet and the British built Neilsons for a potential future project.

 

When you say 6" by 1" you probably mean scale-inches, i.e. 3/4" by 1/8" in reality ?

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Hi Keith I loosely based this model on Louisa which is one of the Hunslet locos, I have not done the saddle tank yet.

The interior is going to be loosely based on the interior of "Integrity" which is quite simple but hearkens to the classic interiors of the restored Cutters of the last century. this will give me ample opportunity to play with different materials. I just love the green tufted cushions and the simple kitchen facilities.

 

Michael

 

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Eberhard, yes I am talking scale inches on the cutter model. I'm sorry that you do not like the saddle tank locos of the British persuasion. As a British lad I grew up on the clean lines of the British locomotive styles that were well looked after until the first grouping of all the small lines that dotted the English countryside.

 

Michael

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10 minutes ago, michael mott said:

Hi Keith I loosely based this model on Louisa which is one of the Hunslet locos, I have not done the saddle tank yet.

Ah! I thought it had the look of a "Percy".

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Michael, I saw the loco and imagined something more common but then Iooked at Louisa and thought of course he would build a more obscure type, every man and his dog would want the flying dutchman or Britania. Very nice choice indeed!

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I continued on the floor units today, and now that the floor is set properly I was able to revisit the dimensions and adjust the drawings for the rest of the interior. I also set the ladder a bit more vertical it is now 22.5 degrees off vertical.

I also decided to cut the stringers by hand and used my centuries old exacto razor saw, it still cuts well I set up a fence on it

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so that I could make the cuts for the treads in the mitre box.

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The mitre box is basically a disposable one it was made out of a bit of maple a few years ago by disposable i mean that eventually it will need to be replaced because it will loose its integrity.

 

The side stringers ready to be chiselled for the treads. the ladder stringers are clear Douglas fir  1 x 6 inches

 

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This cross section image shows the main cabin area that I am modeling.

 

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Michael

 

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Mark thanks for the link,

I have been sorting out how to tackle the side elements of the interior and at the same time discovered an error in the depth of the cabin, I had made it a foot too deep  by correcting the error I was able to make the floor in one level.

The paper template was how I discovered the difference.

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I finished up the work on the basic ladder.

 

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and using a combination of cad work and then freehand drawing over the print was able to get the pattern for the paneling sorted.

 

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I order the save on material and also not to waste some of the divider card that I had been using to plan out the cabin I decided to use the very stiff polished cardstock as the foundation for the wood paneling, first I glued some 1/8+ square stiffeners to the backside of the panels IMG_8685x1024.jpg.d31de1fdbc0fb9f207dc1d68951615d3.jpg

Then cut some 1 inch x 4 inch yellow cedar (had to wear a mask its a nice smell but not too healthy to breath)

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The began roughing out the wood for the stiles and rails. The upper panels are cabinets that will have opening doors with the dining stuff inside.

 

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That's all for now.

 

Michael

 

 

 

 

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