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donrobinson

Barque Stefano by donrobinson - MarisStella - 1:63

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Don really great stuff there.  Your planking looks fantastic!  I too love the look of the beech.  These kits seem very nicely done.

 

Just out of curiosity, what do you think about the copper plates?  How do they compare to the Amati ones?  My MS Charles Morgan uses copper tape that you have to punch for the rivets.  I think it’s easier to apply, but the Amati plates look amazing.

Edited by Landlubber Mike

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Hi Mike, thanks for your comment it's much appreciated. Below is a picture of Amati plates(left) and the MarisStella plates(right). As you can see the MarisStella ones are slightly larger but do have the rivets also. I'm thinking both plates should be much easier in the long run to install versus having to punch the rivets.

IMG_2943.thumb.jpg.33b983286258b84e56e0ba498bf77f9f.jpg

As you can see they are not quite as bright as the Amati ones, they have a little more weathered look which is fine with me

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That beech could make a cool deck me thinks. I'm curious how it takes stain. Natural might do very well.

 

I would also like to find something besides walnut. I ordered 5 different species and will be cutting sticks myself.

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Good morning all, thanks for the comments, likes and visits.

 Since my last post the hull planking has been completed. I stained and put a coat of wipe on poly on the starboard side to see how the beech would look, I'll let you be the judges. Next was removing the bulkhead extensions, cleaning up the freeboard(bulwarks), then carving out the stern area down to deck level. 

Here are the pictures:

IMG_2944.thumb.jpg.9d88a7a1d37d954094db3f49be9538ed.jpg

Here is the beech stained and a coat of wipe on poly. I used a water based stain and only one coat of it. another coat may have improved the look or possibly a coat of sanding sealer. Overlooking the obvious glue stains you can see it does not take stain very evenly. My conclusion is that beech looks better without a stain, should be left clear or painted, which is coming up soon :)

 

IMG_2947.thumb.jpg.8474dd3fabbe7982edc7d6a0b8633a36.jpg

Removing the bulkhead extensions using a veneer saw. These came off quite easily and posed no problems, the veneer saw is defiantly the tool for this job.

 

IMG_2948.thumb.jpg.a129d99be9a76318bfa4329a99d96d11.jpgAbout to start the removal of the stern filler block

 

IMG_2949.thumb.jpg.66ccf98d18e21a5dbbb2f20096fa9d05.jpgIMG_2950.thumb.jpg.28527dd9c59322258c0e75e7a5034cba.jpgIMG_2951.thumb.jpg.5d34139c181b4904058f8c149e0e65c3.jpg

Filler block removed, filler was later applied to floor and sides. The important part here is to maintain the curvature and rise of the deck, this simply done by laying a plank along the bulkhead tops and watching how it is lays. Much the same as you would do when fairing a hull.    

 

IMG_2954.thumb.jpg.7e2238adbff40c9da61b1b95c9557e3f.jpgIMG_2955.thumb.jpg.0bd8e21e97a8c1a40aa02b9364f226b8.jpgIMG_2956.thumb.jpg.4353859029b16d619c6220084129f7fc.jpgIMG_2958.thumb.jpg.a78fc4947268f18a8b9139c9bfa5756d.jpg

These last pictures are showing the cleaning of the freeboard, they will be eventually painted, and the fairing of the bulkhead tops. When fairing the bulkhead tops it is again important to maintain the curve and also to have a consistent height from the top of the bulkhead to the to of the freeboard.

 

That's all for now, next is the first layer of planking on the deck.

See You soon 

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Your planking is superbly done, Don.  In all honesty, though, I don’t love the look of the finished beech.  Just my personal preference.  It’s a shame to cover the planking, but I think that might be the best presentation.

Edited by Hubac'sHistorian

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Doug: You will do just fine, it is not as hard as it looks a sharp chisel does help though. I'm looking forward to you catching up to me.

Ian: good to hear from you, I'm finally making a little progress and thanks for the kudos

Bob: Just a little nasty Bob, I do know when you get your kit you will make it look a lot easier and nicer!!!;)

H.H.: I 100% agree with you. The beech looked fine, I thought, before staining but with the stain it is not appealing what so ever. I will keep using it, if for anything, it"s bending capabilities. I am still very happy and surprised how it is so easily manipulated to shape, well worth keeping on the list of woods to use. 

 

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Hi Don,

Boy, that stern filler block is an interesting bit. It seems like a good way to get the round profile though. It essentially serves as a form, then when it's served its purpose, you simply carve it out. Looks like it's balsa; I bet you're glad you resisted any urge you might have had to use some old oak that was laying around.:)

 

David

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Don, I'm afraid that I won't be doing Stefano. I've pretty much concluded that at my age and current state of health, it would be biting off too much for me. Although it's too late for you and Doug, I have a thought about that stern former for future builders. If I recall, the block consists of three pieces. If, instead of gluing the uppermost part to the others, thin two sided tape were used as  the attachment, removal could be made a lot easier.

 

Bob

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Mike: The filler block acts as a form for the planking then needs to be removed in order to plank the deck, Thanks for stopping by

 

David: You have it dead on David, it was balsa and I was very happy it was. It actually went fairly easy, had it been something like oak the whole ship may have ended in the trash :);) or on the shelf for a very long time.

 

OC: Thanks. I bought this set of chisels from Lee Valley some 30-35 years ago and up until now have rarely used them as I never took the time to sharpen them properly. I now know how to sharpen them, somewhat, and am enjoying using them now.

 

Mike: Thanks Mike. These kits are really full of surprises and innovations that makes them fun to build.

 

Bob: Sorry to hear that Bob, health is very important so look after that first. That is a great idea for the stern filler block and would have worked perfectly! A perfect example why, even if you are not going to build the Stefano, I still need you to keep watching and sharing your vast knowledge. Thanks and take care my friend.

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Mike: The veneer saw is especially good in this application as it only cuts on the one side so it does not damage the bulkhead. I found this one on Amazon for around $30 Cdn. I think the beech is defiantly worth having in the workshop if anything for it's bending capabilities. This is maybe what you need for your Trajta

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Hello everyone, I'm hoping you are all having a good day and your shipyards are active.

 I have been busy planking the hull and now the deck, two layers, for what now seems a eternity so yesterday I decided to turn my attention to something required further on in the build.

 The aft cabin has a rail on top of it that needs to have stanchions, these are made from 3 mm dowel and then shaped accordingly. Although nothing real fancy or anything, I thought you may want to see how I made them.

 

IMG_2966.thumb.jpg.7a33002518f534462e892337df7b09f9.jpg

3 mm dowel in chuck 

 

IMG_2967.thumb.jpg.88b2323df1e2dcaf6c0cd81bad95657a.jpg

First cut is made, .100 from the end and .021 deep

 

IMG_2968.thumb.jpg.37f8cd1f3d5dd3bd9157dd8ef0f1e763.jpg

second cut made, .460 from the end and .01 deep

 

IMG_2969.thumb.jpg.633fc2b5cc1aae3a0d5c1769924ee452.jpg

Shaping is done using a sanding stick on the backside

 

IMG_2970.thumb.jpg.8db90c6b98c553b08c4c85ebdc6d60f2.jpg
 

Final shaping done and parting groove is cut at .560 from the end. Final parting was done with a razor saw, with lathe turned off

 

IMG_2972.thumb.jpg.048b094bce22d4cf657d1acc67a35438.jpg

Culling out the rejects, on the left

 

IMG_2975.thumb.jpg.2b57a99056ed95dddc01ce6349e270cd.jpg
Length when parted from lathe is .560 inches or approximately 14 mm, which allows for 1 mm to be sanded off each end to arrive at a final measurement of 12 mm. When I tried to make these at the exact length the 1 mm collar would chip or break so making them longer prevented this. I used a Byrnes disc sander for sanding the ends which made this part of the job very easy.

 As you can see nothing out of the ordinary but it was lots of fun, and Doug(Heronguy), if you are reading, this is the reason you NEED a lathe:D;)

 For anyone considering buying a mill, having a DRO(digital read out) really helps for something like this when there are repetitive cuts. It saves on mistakes and time, I would defiantly recommend buying one when ordering a mill.

 

 You all have fun and enjoy the weekend. It's snowing here now so it looks like I'll be storm stayed for the weekend :), luckily enough the food and refreshment fridges are both well stocked!!

IMG_2964.jpg

Edited by donrobinson

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Very nice Don.  And a useful little tutorial for me.  I can hardly wait 'til my lathe arrives - but I guess I'll have to order it before that happens.  Too cold here for the next month or so to work out in the shed so there is no real hurry  to order one.  Good thing our Stefanos need lots of planking - that'll keep me busy until the warmer weather.  

 

Prairie winter storms - I don't miss them!

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