Jump to content
KeithAug

Schooner Germania (Nova) by KeithAug - Scale 1:36 - 1908 / 2011

Recommended Posts

Nice work Keith, those protection bars should come up a treat.  I used the same process but wood rather than metal batons in one skylight, then rather than chance the drilling had the batons for the protective bars photo etched (cheating I know :) )

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, BANYAN said:

photo etched (cheating I know :) )

Pat - I would have done the same had I not been impatient. Not sure the photo etch industry is open at the moment in the UK.

 

9 hours ago, Retired guy said:

the real boat did they ever have some nice carpentry

Richard - Yes - the woodwork was well done. I don't think I could afford a weeks hire let alone the cost of building. I think it resold recently for about 15 million euros.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, KeithAug said:

My memory failed me - she is currently on sale for a mere 5 million euros, just popping out to see if the bank will give me a loan!!!!!

Keith, just offer to exchange your model for the real thing; same quality of workmanship ;) 

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/15/2020 at 12:51 PM, druxey said:

Keith: 96 holes, no drill breakage

Than you Druxey - I have about 100 more to do on other skylights so I have set myself a challenge.

 

18 hours ago, BANYAN said:

Keith, just offer to exchange your model

Pat, Unfortunately I couldn't afford the running costs - which I suspect is why Germania has been on sale twice in the last 3 years. It is used for charters and I suspect Covid 19 has put paid to that for a while. I suspect it will sell quite cheaply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent some time working on the skylights - quite fiddly work. I like trying something new but I can be quite slow until I have worked out the technique.

 

You can see from the photo that the bars stand above the glass.

fullsizeoutput_2120.jpeg.8ec766dbd879ecc7e37b62fd9954e83e.jpeg

Having made the skylight frames I glued the predrilled brass surrounds into the rebates with CA glue.

I then drilled the frames through the holes.

DSC09850.thumb.JPG.001927468ae9cc71b4bf2d46d41e0e5a.JPG

I then made a former for bending the brass bars out of a scrap of nylon. This was milled to the required size. The bars were made out of .020" diameter hard brass wire . This was wound round the former while keeping plenty of tension on it. Once wound the wire was held in place by an elastic band.

DSC09853.thumb.JPG.f698bd8416f2fee06642957d6e7fd127.JPG

The hoops were then cut using a piercing saw.

DSC09854.thumb.JPG.7adb08b78c0e0cf59467961300238457.JPG

The bars turned out identical but had to be re bent to create the 90 angle.DSC09862.thumb.JPG.58bd6c72af73d27e6f926756cc8d390e.JPG

The bars were then inserted into the frame. In the next photo the depth to which the bars are inserted is being controlled by a piece of perspex temporarily placed above the frame. The end of the perspex can be seen as the triangular shape on the lower edge of the frame.

DSC09851.thumb.JPG.7665a2c5f6fa0b037b7afef1db851385.JPG

With all the bars for the first window inserted the bars were pressed hard against the perspex and then glued with CA from the reverse side.

DSC09858.thumb.JPG.0274a648e613d5180688d497ad1d54b1.JPG

I dont have very large hands but you can see the lights are about as big as my thumb nail. The yellow of the windows is because they are being protected by masking tape.

fullsizeoutput_20c6.jpeg.f332de5d98397a40bff4bd96376082de.jpeg

The rear view shows the glued projections of the bars - these were cut off and filed flat.

DSC09866.thumb.JPG.2bfb1f58aeb0a0e976636f18fd40198d.JPG

Once finished the windows are no longer very obvious. 

DSC09863.thumb.JPG.11ac62165413126fd9e5c8ae97f92738.JPG

I will slightly rebend the bars to even up slight difference in spacing before mounting.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crisp job, as always !

 

It is a good idea to glue the brass frames onto the wooden frames first and then drill and insert the bars. I remember me struggling with alining the brass frames and bars before installing them on the wood ... It is often so important to do things in the 'right' sequence, which sometimes is not the obvious or the prototype one.

 

The bars have to be distanced from the glass, otherwise they would not protect it - anything bouncing against the bars would push them into the glass and possibly break it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Eberhard, Pat and Steve - also thanks to everyone for the likes.

 

I finished installing the skylights and completed the small piece of flat surface. Not much explanation necessary but here are a few photos:-

 

DSC09871.thumb.JPG.f6a53d2c6fdf98d02419abca745c19dc.JPG

I did slight adjustment to some of the bars with the point of a scribe until all the spacing looked even. fullsizeoutput_20c9.thumb.jpeg.bb8a3cb30e2f2505acea171f56cc78e0.jpegfullsizeoutput_20cb.thumb.jpeg.5f84a92671852e989ba86e4dd3465d51.jpegDSC09882.thumb.JPG.62852cebe1c72fc8e1200bac0a9f60ab.JPG

I still need to add the hinges and vents and of course will need to paint them with poly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fullsizeoutput_211a.jpeg.b8c37fc5fec42eb5f659f646f052eae4.jpeg

 

Those "mystery padeyes" continue to intrigue me, although the mystery may never be solved. At the risk of "flogging the poodle," I wonder if they might be for securing the sheets of a loose-footed storm trisail?  Just one more option in the "multiple choice test" where the answer "none of the above" may be the only correct one. :D 

 

Beautiful work on the skylight bars! Thanks for sharing your fine workmanship.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/17/2020 at 2:33 PM, Bob Cleek said:

Those "mystery padeyes" continue to intrigue me, although the mystery may never be solved.

Rather than tying the helmsman to the wheel in a storm, they can chain him down to those pad-eyes!  :piratetongueor4: ☠️

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Keith 

 

Before I shower you with the praise that you most definitely DESERVE...there’s a conversation that’s going on in my head.  It goes something like this:

 

”Me:  Keith...if I click my fingers twice, is it true that by some form of scientific Magic, that a small sprinkling of your skills and talent are going to rub off on me...???’  Pretty please?’

 

”You:  Dream on Patrick, dream on”....Hehehe

 

Seriously though, Keith, I’m always in awe of what you do.  
 

All the best and stay safe.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent job on the skylights Keith, they look terrific.  I especially like your work on the bar guarding.  Repetitive, evenly spaced details like this require such precision as the eye will quickly pick out the slightest irregularity.  Very nice work as always.

 

Gary  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Hubert and Sceatha.

On 4/19/2020 at 1:55 AM, Roger Pellett said:

The mystery padeye,  How about an attachment point for a block to sheet home a large reaching “fisherman” Staysail?

Roger - a possibility - but all the other deck attachment points are of the conventional eyebolt type.

 

On 4/19/2020 at 10:33 AM, Omega1234 said:

All the best and stay safe.

Thank you for the complements Pat. I sometimes wonder how you manage at miniature scale so I too find your work impressive. As for staying safe its difficult not to be when confined to barracks. I think this is going to be going on for a long time.

On 4/19/2020 at 3:29 PM, FriedClams said:

Repetitive, evenly spaced details like this require such precision

Thank you Gary, modesty compels me to point out that the mill did all the hard work.

On 4/18/2020 at 8:17 PM, Zbip57 said:

Rather than tying the helmsman to the wheel in a storm, they can chain him down to those pad-eyes!  :piratetongueor4: ☠️

Zbip - yes others have suggested this use - although I am not altogether convinced. A short life line attached somewhere near the centre line is a better way of keeping the helmsman on board.

On 4/19/2020 at 6:59 PM, noel_colledge said:

but if the boat is for sale with a broker would it be worth dropping them an email to ask them directly

Noel - good Idea but it would spoil all the guessing fun. I might try it though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Keith.

 

As for “being confined to barracks going on for a while yet’, sadly I think you’re right.  Who knows when this dreadful mess is going to end.  I’m certainly missing being able to hug my son and daughter (and their respective spouses).  

 

I just guess we have to do what we have to do.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Richard.

 

On 4/24/2020 at 6:44 AM, Omega1234 said:

I’m certainly missing being able to hug my son and daughter (and their respective spouses).

Yes Patrick - the same here. Thank god for video conferencing.

 

I am slowly working my way through the deck houses - so this is sort of a repeat of previous posts. That being the case I'll post the photos with a minimum of text.

 

As previously I started with a sketch scaled from the plan and augmented with measurements taken from photos. Each square on the sketch represents 0.1".

fullsizeoutput_20fe.thumb.jpeg.9f5e5a9660a5216fd99fcde59c875f82.jpeg 

DSC09897.thumb.JPG.f7d0f99da32fcb3cd2f392ed6a664e43.JPG

DSC09904.thumb.JPG.69079d98acafbc98c78d4b0865e36402.JPG

DSC09908.thumb.JPG.db94c4a8129bf207319245190c728523.JPG

I made more window frame edge strip.

DSC09909.thumb.JPG.56dced8fe5aeb998b36b74ce711d07ca.JPG

I made more brass edge strip. Another 88 0.6mm  diameter holes all drilled with the same carbide drill used for the previous 96 holes - now a total of 184 holes. Is this a record?

DSC09910.thumb.JPG.aa2ed8c264999c2edb735f59bdaeb816.JPG

The edge strips were installed as per previous post.

DSC09911.thumb.JPG.25d33d293d2b250f7d87ffba7bf2fb3d.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Boris and Keith.

 

Mark / Paul thank you for following my exploits with my carbide drill, its an old friend and I will miss it once it has gone.

 

Today was wet so I got on with the protection bars.

DSC09915.thumb.JPG.500dfce1f728c009c4371bf44d24e47b.JPG

DSC09916.thumb.JPG.00f4d3e302f48cfcf5474439d3bfdc39.JPG

I also needed to make the hinge straps - these are .04" wide and i decided the best way to make them was to file flats on either side of .04" brass rod. I did this by taking a piece of wood, cutting a slot in it .03" deep and then gluing the rod in it and filing off one side. Then a second slot was cut .02" deep and the rod was flipped over and re-glued before filing off the other side. Thus producing a  strip of .04"x .02".

DSC09913.thumb.JPG.2aaf9ae760a711bf7bda754d05e8d380.JPG

The straps were cut to length while still attached to the wood.

DSC09914.thumb.JPG.d85e0c019e9d90b067ef452a2692c18d.JPG

I also made simulation hinges by soldering wire to the edge of a strip of brass and then cutting off short lengths.

DSC09919.thumb.JPG.639093a75a44ac4ccad0c9261140096d.JPG

The simulation hinges were then glued in place.

DSC09921.thumb.JPG.7ebbd92812eeae9017da19a1ac29f864.JPG

DSC09923.thumb.JPG.fcce16aadbd838c6e82f79bdcd0521bf.JPG

I needed to add hinges to the previously completed skylights but the hinges for these were only single sided.

DSC09924.thumb.JPG.454fc261c6ea5c0cf03bc269fc187c88.JPG

Once more they were cut to length and glued in place.

DSC09927.thumb.JPG.cb2dd5e2aa78ee40cd8b92d0ef295c78.JPG

DSC09928.thumb.JPG.72ccd99d049b557efc22cfab39fa9c52.JPG

All a bit of a fiddle but it did successfully fill a wet day.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...