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Do You enjoy Rigging your ship?

48 posts in this topic

Ahoy Mates

 

I am just about to start on the main rigging of my Mary Rose and am excited about doing the rigging. Not only because I have been building the ship for over two years now and it's a welcome change,but that now after rigging 3 ship models in 3 years I really love to work on the rigging.

 

From searching thru my books for how to rig different time periods and ship types to seeing how tight and consistent I can get my seizing.And seeing what everyone here is working on,and getting answers to questions here.

 

And most important how even all the deadeye's  lashing  to each other.

 

And with most builds there's another area and skill to learn and master. Like in diemaking after a while there's little that is really new,just different situations   doing the same things. And trying to master what you are doing.

 

So back to my question-do you like rigging?

 

What do you like and what do you not.

 

Keith

mtaylor, EJ_L, CaptainSteve and 4 others like this

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I really enjoy rigging my ships. It is very difficult and frustrating at times but the challenge is a welcome one. Every line I get installed I find myself sitting back and enjoying the new addition. Each ship I have built I try to do a better job with my rigging in making sure they are seized correctly, ran to the correct belaying pins or cleats, rigged through the blocks or that the blocks are the right ones. Each build I have learned something new and each has become better for it.

 

Like any aspect of ship building where there is a lot of repetition it can become monotonous and I am ready to see the end of it after a while but that is no different then planking or any other phase really.

Canute, Elijah, mtaylor and 5 others like this

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I too enjoy rigging. I've done several models of differing complexity. I'm about to start on rigging my Emma C. Berry and looking forward to it.

 

It is a relatively simple rig (cat sloop) but at the model's scale (1:32) it has many more units than smaller scales. It will be a challenge with all its links, hearts, buls eyes, blocks, seizings, etc.

Walt

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Rigging is the best part of ship model building for me. (Well, except maybe starting a new project  :D )

I find the rigging part to be extremely fun to do, (well, except tying several thousands of clove hitches on the ratlines  :D )

 

And especially because that is the last step before finishing the project, (and start a new one  :D )

 

Best regards

 

Ulises

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Not everyone enjoys rigging, or some other aspects, so no apology needed.  

 

I happen to enjoy rigging, don't know why but all those lines control the yards and sails which drive the ship, and give character to her.  I find rattling down to cause some dain bramage though, but a good ale straightens me out.  And when done, she sure looks good.

 

So, not every aspect gives the same enjoyment, but one must still git 'er done.

 

Keep on building and above all, have fun.                      Duff 

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I very much enjoy the rigging portion of a build.  Although, I might change my mind after this build.  I've set myself to a very big challenge.  I intend to rig this ship as close as possible to actual practice.  Meaning all of the appropriate bends, hitches, splices, and seizings.  No glue in the rigging.  And, lines of the proper length to work the rig.  I should be able to change the set of the sails at any time (not that I would ever do that in the future.)

 

At 1:100 scale we will see if I have set the bar too high.

 

Regards,

EJ_L, mtaylor, -Mike- and 5 others like this

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Building scratch deck furniture is my favourite part of a build but I do enjoy rigging. I have just built my own motorised rope walker and will be making my own ropes for my current build - The Bounty - when the time comes. This should make rigging even more satisfying.

Edited by hornet
Canute, popeye2sea, mtaylor and 2 others like this

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I must absolutely love rigging or be a masochist one. HMS Victory first shrouds and ratlines not acceptable looked bad, cut every one out.

Completely reinstalled all (how many knots in 2 sets of shrouds and ratlines)

 

That being said, I enjoy the rigging most of all even after all that.

Canute, mtaylor, EJ_L and 3 others like this

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I have found that my favorite part of model building, is the phase that I am about to start. My least favorite is the part that I just finished.  So, all-in-all; I love/hate each phase in turn. :blink:

 

Having said that, I do like tying ratlines. I get into a sort-of zen like state, except I am focused on the ratlines instead of my breathing. Disclaimer: I know nothing about Zen, so any relationship between my opinion and reality is purely coincidental.

 

Skip

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Absolutely love it!!  Of course, building the old Revell big sailing ships, it's what made them come to life for me - the rigging is at the same time part of the beauty of a ship and the very life of it, for the position of the rigging/sails determine the movement, life and death of it.  I love the hull lines of the sharper ships, but when they are in the water, they are for the most part, hidden from view, and this brings the position and rake of the masts into the fore, and the ballet, as it were, of the rigging into play.  And of course it helps when you like 'busy' designs -  one time I showed my sister a picture of a model of a clipper shp and she exclaimed "Look at the strings on that thing!"

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I love rigging in every way except the ratlines... which is where i am right now with the Kate Cory build of mine. When those are done it is smooth sailing and lots of fun to rig a sailing vessel... even more fun to make the rigging actually work the way it is supposed to on the real ship. The model just comes to life with every addition.

mtaylor, Professor, coxswain and 1 other like this

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The rigging of a ship gives me pleasure. From start to finish the complexity and sometimes frustration make the outcome worthwhile for me. While doing Sergals Thermopylae the plans were terrible and a lot of my own imagination. And now that I have a few books on rigging I have thought about starting over. Mike

post-24388-0-01322300-1465149747_thumb.jpeg

Edited by RedDawg
skipper1947, EJ_L, coxswain and 1 other like this

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@RedDawg. I noticed in your Thermo you have all the central rigging but no shrouds. Did you do it in that order on purpose? I think this way is more likely that some of the rigging interferes with the correct laying of the shrouds. Just a thought.

mtaylor and Azzoun like this

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Ulises, I had started rigging the shrouds but the deadeyes were falling apart and then to make matters worse I was around twenty to thirty short. So I ordered some three mm from Ages of sail, but they sent me five mm instead. So I decided that as I'm going to order the triangular deadeyes that are on the Sovereign poster, that I will reorder for the Thermopylae again. I have a build out of my own imagination that I've started so the five mm will be used for it.

post-24388-0-82393700-1465156084_thumb.jpg

Edited by RedDawg
Ulises Victoria, EJ_L and mtaylor like this

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Hi all,

 

        I myself have a love, hate relationship with rigging. That being said, I build fantasy ships so there are no rules I have to follow, except maybe the basics. I am always in awe of the rigging I see on this site, which makes me try to do better on my builds.

        Hopefully someday my skill level will allow me to rig a ship correctly, then I will see how I really feel about rigging...lol

 

   Keith

EJ_L, Rick01 and mtaylor like this

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In a somewhat strained metaphor to "rubber meeting the road", I believe rigging is where the "cloth meets the wind." And, "knowing the ropes" means harnessing the forces that makes a sailing ship, a ship.

 

I believe spending the effort to detail accurate rigging on one's model is when a sailing ship truly comes alive. It's one of my favorite tasks!

 

Ron

post-31-0-53959300-1465233929.jpg

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In reading all the posts in this thread, it is obvious that the vast majority of us ship builders do enjoy the part of the rigging.

 

On a side thought, it is hard to believe that the whole operation and in some cases the life of such majestic man creations, was dependent almost totally upon the humble hemp rope.

 

Cheers

 

Ulises

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Ulises,

You bring up a good point in saying that the life of a ship was largely dependent upon such a simple thing. It is crazy to think that without this simple item of rope, ships for thousands of years were in a way just floating pile of timber no better than a simple rowboat.

 

I think that from reading through this thread that the enjoyment of rigging isn't always so much in the actual act of rigging but in both the relief of having completed hundreds of hours of hull planking, carving, and furniture building and can now do something else, as well as the awe factor that a ships rigging inspires. Miles of rope that to the average person looks like a confusing tangle that no one could understand is actually what allowed ships to perform. To ship enthusiasts this is comparable to engines in sports cars. This is the power and control of a ship. I think that is why so may of us enjoy rigging. We are building the engines of our ships and bringing them to life.

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