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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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I am stalled on working this endeavor as I am remodeling a first floor work area in our house for both my wife's art works and my model building. In doing so I had to move some 1970 ish model kits from a well known US manufacturer. It was striking to open the box of Rattlesnake and examine the dormant kit. I mused to myself, in today's light,  that the kit should go to the "auction block" or elsewhere.

 

Indeed the industry has come a long way in nearly 50 years especially so in the last 10 or so. But Chuck, I think I speak for all modelers when I say you have advanced this wonderful "passion" to a level that may not be achievable in a full production environment. And it is hard to see how it can be surpassed! You are truly gifted and the fact that you share your gifts is remarkable.

 

Joe

 

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No progress on my Winnie but I finally found a day to fix my Cheerful.  It got severely damaged when i brought it to the joint clubs show.  The model got smashed on the ride back and the rigging pulled off the pin rails and the stern knees.  It was a bear to position those pin rails against the bulwarks with so much tension on the lines.  But i managed it without having to re rig anything except for the rope coils on the pin rails. The rigging on the bowsprit was also ripped away from the tip of the bowsprit. and that needing fixing.   Bigger job than i would have liked.
 

They are never the same after such a repair but I am glad its done.  It was also filthy and covered with webs and dust.

 

i will now put it away where it will be safe and protected.

 

Interesting size comparison and note the color.  The cheerful is all boxwood.  The cedar Winnie really looks good in comparison and its 75% cheaper.

5232FEF9-7DEA-4D0C-B0F5-3E7A2052C507.jpeg

984F1877-FF8E-414F-AB83-B54FA10AECD8.jpeg

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The Cheerful is a wonderful little cutter.  Seems the cedar is an outstanding alternative.  I wonder if a bit of a sensitivity to western red cedar translates over to the alaskan yellow

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For some folks yes but its not too bad.

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The stern transom details are now completed....along with chapter 3.  I still have to finish writing it though.  Then I will start getting the laser cut pieces together for you folks.   The columns were added to finish it off.  These were done exactly like those on the quarter galleries.  The outside face of each upright between the windows were painted blue first.  I was careful not to get the paint on the sides of the uprights.  The top and bottom of each column was was cut to length from a strip of 3/32 x 1/32" boxwood.  This strip was first scraped to create the profile needed (all those steps in each base and top).  Once I cut and angled each piece I used a needle file to also shape the ends to match the profile.  Then the center fluted column which is laser cut and etched was glued between them.  I just removed the char and then tweaked the length for a tight fit.

 

Lastly, the two small figures were glued to the front of those wider

 columns.  That really finished the look of the stern.  I am quite happy with the results so far.  The color of the resin was tinted a bit as previously mentioned.

sterncarvings2.jpg

sterncarvings6.jpg

sterncarvings7.jpg

sterncarvings8.jpg

sterncarvings9.jpg

 

Chuck

 

 

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This is so beautiful. I may have to stop following your log so that I don’t have such high expectations if I decide to start building it someday 😉.  Thanks for putting in such effort to explain it all!

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21 hours ago, MEDDO said:

The Cheerful is a wonderful little cutter.  Seems the cedar is an outstanding alternative.  I wonder if a bit of a sensitivity to western red cedar translates over to the alaskan yellow

I'm building the Medway Longboat and it's AYC. I found that I need to wear a dust mask when I'm sanding it especially when I'm sanding with very fine grit. The very fine dust gets me coughing. I think it's probably wise for us to wear a dust mask regardless of the wood we are sanding since even the dust we aren't so sensitive too can't be good deep down in our lungs.

 

Bob

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Unbelievably beautiful, Chuck! There is no doubt that I will have to have a go at the Winnie someday. You've set the bar so high it's a bit intimidating though!

 

Bob

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thanks guys.   Its not too tough Bob.  Its about the same difficulty as my other designs like the long boat.  Just bigger with more parts.

 

no more difficult to build in my opinion...but i am probably not the best person to ask since I designed it.

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Im really curious about the paper patterns - how do you not get glue bubbles when applying and also would it be possible to put a finish over them ( dont think that would work due to printer ink)

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Try not to over think it.  Never got any bubbles.  Not even a little bit.  I  just use a glue stick.  Works perfectly.  Make sure no lumpy glue.  Stick it on.  Its really that simple. For a finish I spray them with matte fixative and let them dry before cutting them out. 
 

if you are curious....print one out and glue it to some scrap as a test.  It should answer all your questions.  Spray mount would also work but less open time.  With the glue stick you can move it around and slide it before it sets.
 

 

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5 hours ago, Chuck said:

thanks guys.   Its not too tough Bob.  Its about the same difficulty as my other designs like the long boat.  Just bigger with more parts.

 

no more difficult to build in my opinion...but i am probably not the best person to ask since I designed it.

Thanks, Chuck, for the encouragement. I've been learning a ton building the Medway Longboat but it hasn't been without some errors on my part even though I've been trying my level best. When I look at the photos of your Winnie build, it simply looks perfect. I can't imagine it could be any better and I have a hard time imagining that I could come close to that level of craftsmanship. It just looks so beautiful that I worry that I just wouldn't do it justice or, at least, wouldn't be able to do it as well as I would like. I think I'm my own worst critic, which can serve me well in striving to get better but it can get in the way of me being satisfied also. I'm working on it though! 

 

Bob 

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5 hours ago, ChrisLBren said:

Im really curious about the paper patterns - how do you not get glue bubbles when applying and also would it be possible to put a finish over them ( dont think that would work due to printer ink)

I used the glue stick method on my Medway Longboat and it worked very well. I found it easy to remove even after I had applied it also. I didn't like how the frieze looked on the stern the first time I glued it on. I didn't have it with equal symmetry around the edges so I pulled it off and cleaned the stern up with a moistened cloth. Then I printed another set off patterns and was more careful in my application of the frieze and trimming it to get it centered nicely. I did forget to spray it with fixative before I applied it and now I'm wondering if there is a way to seal it without masking it all off and spraying fixative on it...brush it somehow with fixative...??...or just leave it be?

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What an excellent and beautiful design!! We are lucky to participate in this, thanks Chuck!

Will you leave this black hole for the rudder like it is, or open it later?

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It will be opened.  But that will be done later.  

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I have been away from the site for a bit. I came back and started binge reading through my favorite build logs from before I left. Went looking for your cheerful log and found this. Loving it. Came to the last page with sadness and now I can’t wait to see this come to completion! Amazing work! Thank you!

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Hi Chuck,

 

I just noticed that the parts for chapter 3 are already sold out. Will you have more available soon. I check the SYREN site regularly and I just must have missed it.

 

Thanks,

 

Iran

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Maybe in a week or so.  I am pretty sure most you guys arent ready for them yet so there is no hurry to buy them.  In fact it might be better to wait until you are nearly ready for them because by that time I may have the parts available for chapter four also.

 

Chuck

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Cant say really.  I am still writing it.  But not too long.  I am confident it will be ready sooner than anyone will need it.

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Just another quick note to make sure everyone checks and corrects the angle of their stern frames.   If you pushed back those outside stern frames when you framed the q galleries, you will run into problems later on.

 

transomangle.jpg

 

In addition, be sure to fair the width of those outside stern frames properly to match the width shown on your plans.  This will also have an impact on how easily you can frame your quarter galleries in chapter 3.  Your transom filling piece wont fit correctly.   Do a lot of checking against the plans.  You will be so happy you did.  Many might not realize how the smallest details will have an enormous impact later in the project.   When you build a complex subject like the Winnie you must think several moves ahead like when you play chess.   This is often hard to visualize but I will do my best to point these areas out as I recognize that some folks may be overlooking them.  All of these details were mentioned in the instructions so please read each step several times and even highlight certain areas like these so you wont forget check them against the plans.

 

from-sheet-2.jpg

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Chuck,

just out of curiosity, why were the two aft quarter galley windows blacked out? Did all vessels of the time do this?

Thanks,

JJ

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