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Byrnes Table Saw making a 1mm by 1mm strip


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Hi all! So I now have a Byrnes saw and have very little idea on how to use it. Yay! The ultimate goal is to make fine precise wood strips 1mm by 1mm thick so the question is what is the process needed to get to such a specific and small wood strip? Like how should the machine be set up for something so small and precise? I'm open to suggestions and words of wisdom and experience resources to watch or read if i need a sliding tray, ive already ordered a calibre. Ill add pics of what I currently have (blades and otherwise) shortly.

20200805_142221.jpg

Build on hold: HM Sultana 1/64th scale

 

Current Build: 31 ton Doughty revenue cutter as USRC Active 1/64th scale (in progress)

 

Future Interests: Ballahoo, Diligence, Halifax and beyond...

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What are the dimensions and type of wood billet you are starting with? The process is you use a larger saw to create a smaller billet down to say 3/8 to 1/2” thick, then move to the jimsaw and cut 1mm thick planks off of it (so now they are 3/8” ish x 1mm thick strips) and then take those planks and run them through again making 1x1mm strips .... hope that helps....

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First read the instructions that came with the saw. (I'm not saying this to be snarky. You'd be amazed how many people in this world never read the instructions... including my Dearly Beloved.) The instructions should show you how to set up your saw. You will probably want to move the fence to the other side of the blade and you'll want to find a place to keep your miter gauge until you are ready to use it besides where you've got it in the photo. 

 

Then, start with the YouTube video below and then keep watching the basic full-size table saw operation videos on this page: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+use+a+table+saw  The operation of the Byrnes saw is the same as that for a full-size table saw. Pay close attention to the safe operation rules. The Byrnes Saw is small and quiet, but no less worthy of respect than a full-size table saw. It will injure in all the same ways, albeit perhaps on a smaller scale. 

 

To get the most from your saw, you will probably want to also acquire the factory-made cross-cutting sled that will make short repetitive cross cuts easily and with extreme accuracy. 

 

This advice may seem a bit simplistic, but a good command of the basics will get you off on the right foot. 

 

 

 

 

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Charlie,

 

First thing- Take out the little peg that fits into the miter gage to index it at 90 and 45 degrees.  Paint it with the brightest paint that you have.  When you drop it on the floor, you’ll have a fighting chance of finding it.

 

As usual don’t ask me how Iknow this.

 

Roger

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Thanks guys! Yeah all of this makes sense. Bob by sled do you mean this sliding table pictured? 

 

While I'm at it any other parts I should consider? I have many blades and the attachments you see. 

SlidingTable-500.png

Build on hold: HM Sultana 1/64th scale

 

Current Build: 31 ton Doughty revenue cutter as USRC Active 1/64th scale (in progress)

 

Future Interests: Ballahoo, Diligence, Halifax and beyond...

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Ok i ordered the sliding table and tilting table attachments as well. I think that's everything. I'll add my progress on here until I get to my desired result. Thanks everyone for the support! 😊

Build on hold: HM Sultana 1/64th scale

 

Current Build: 31 ton Doughty revenue cutter as USRC Active 1/64th scale (in progress)

 

Future Interests: Ballahoo, Diligence, Halifax and beyond...

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Lou I have many sizes and types of milled wood already. So let's say I use a 3" by 1/8" wood piece and want to make several strips so yeah the method you mentioned sounds what I assumed to be. And what was said about the blades its simply a matter of practice and I am unsure how to make something so precise as a 1mm cut. Like what sort of push stick is used for something that tiny? :)

Build on hold: HM Sultana 1/64th scale

 

Current Build: 31 ton Doughty revenue cutter as USRC Active 1/64th scale (in progress)

 

Future Interests: Ballahoo, Diligence, Halifax and beyond...

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As a newbie to the Byrnes saw (although I've used a larger saw quite a lot), I don't think you need a push stick that small. You would be cutting 1mm strips from a wider strip that is 1mm thick. You keep cutting strips off until the remainder is too narrow to work with. The remaining strip will be wider than 1mm. How narrow a strip would be left will come with practice but I'm assuming several mm. 

 

Richard

Current Build: Early 19th Century US Revenue Cutter (Artesania Latina "Dallas" - messed about)

Completed Build: Yakatabune - Japanese - Woody Joe mini

Member: Nautical Research Guild & Midwest Model Shipwrights

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Yeah I don’t use a push stick - first I set a “bit” of offset clearance on the far end of the fence, I use my left hand to push the billet Down onto the table and also into the fence (fence is on the right side of blade), and my right hand (fingers) to push the billet into the blade path, as your billet gets close to the end of the cut I move my right hand around to the back of the saw and pull the piece you are cutting the rest of the way through the cut. Have you seen this user guide? 
 

https://modelshipworld.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=471844

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I often use a #2 pencil with an eraser as a push stick. The eraser side down on the wood. I also make up push sticks as I go. It only takes a few seconds. Rule One: Never reach over a table saw blade. Rule Two: Never stand in line with the blade. (Avoid getting hit by a kick-back.) Rule Three: Always use a push stick when ripping.

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Cutting strips that small is certainly possible, but.....    some wood species are fine for this, others, not so much.  Sharp blade for sure, (new saw from Jim, so no doubt a good blade)     Or, if you are having trouble getting the size perfect, cut to about 1.5 or even larger, then using a thickness sander (Jim makes a great one) you can safely reduce the size to within a thousandth of an inch or so.  Just another way to get to the end result.  

Allan

PLEASE take 30 SECONDS and sign up for the epic Nelson/Trafalgar project if you would like to see it made into a TV series.   Click on http://trafalgar.tv   There is no cost other than the 30 seconds of your time.  THANK YOU

 

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Has anyone mentioned blade height?

 

I wouldn't have the blade height much higher than the final thickness, and also at low RPM..

Luck is just another word for good preparation.

—MICHAEL ROSE

Current builds:    Rattlesnake (Scratch From MS Plans 

On Hold:  HMS Resolution ( AKA Ferrett )

In the Gallery: Yacht Mary,  Gretel, French Cannon

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On 10/12/2020 at 2:37 PM, Bob Cleek said:

I often use a #2 pencil with an eraser as a push stick. The eraser side down on the wood. I also make up push sticks as I go. It only takes a few seconds. Rule One: Never reach over a table saw blade. Rule Two: Never stand in line with the blade. (Avoid getting hit by a kick-back.) Rule Three: Always use a push stick when ripping.

 

Excellent advice, Bob.  I would add Rule 4: Rehearse the cut. i.e. without the saw running push the work through exactly as you plan to do.  This enables you to answer questions like - where will my hands be? Is there any obstruction on the exit side? etc.

 

John

Current Build:

Medway Longboat

Completed Builds:

Concord Stagecoach

HM Cutter Cheerful

Royal Caroline

Schooner for Port Jackson

 

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Charlie,

Use something "disposable" for a push stick.  I use chopsticks which run around a dollar or two for a bag of them.  When one gets too chewed up to use, I toss it and get another one.

Mark
"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me

Current Build:                                                                                             
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I've used paint stirring sticks. The one gallon size is about right. HomeDepot sell them for about a dollar for 10.

Richard

Current Build: Early 19th Century US Revenue Cutter (Artesania Latina "Dallas" - messed about)

Completed Build: Yakatabune - Japanese - Woody Joe mini

Member: Nautical Research Guild & Midwest Model Shipwrights

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5 hours ago, bartley said:

Excellent advice, Bob.  I would add Rule 4: Rehearse the cut. i.e. without the saw running push the work through exactly as you plan to do.  this enables you to answer questions like - where will my hands be? Is any obstruction on the exit side? etc.

 

John


rule #5: talk to the wood, apologize for the pain you are incurring to it’s essence, carefully collect and bury the dust created from the cut.

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10 hours ago, mtaylor said:

Charlie,

Use something "disposable" for a push stick.  I use chopsticks which run around a dollar or two for a bag of them.  When one gets too chewed up to use, I toss it and get another one.

 

Any time your push stick gets bit by the blade, it's time to do some serious analysis to identify why that happened. Better a "sacrificial" push stick gets bit than your flesh, but even so, it ain't supposed to happen. :D 

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Mark, Don't throw away the bamboo chopsticks.  Split them several times, stick them in a plastic bag, and they are ready for the drawplate to make trennals the next time you need some.

Allan

PLEASE take 30 SECONDS and sign up for the epic Nelson/Trafalgar project if you would like to see it made into a TV series.   Click on http://trafalgar.tv   There is no cost other than the 30 seconds of your time.  THANK YOU

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi everyone just an update, here it is a 1 mm strip! This one was made of basswood but if I was able to do basswood this precise, harder woods should be even easier. I followed the advice of 3/8" by 1mm and then cut the strip. I wouldn't say I'm great at it yet but I have the means now to keep at it and practice. Thank you all for assistance in helping me understand to usage of the machine. What a smooth cut! 😊

20201031_201222.jpg

Build on hold: HM Sultana 1/64th scale

 

Current Build: 31 ton Doughty revenue cutter as USRC Active 1/64th scale (in progress)

 

Future Interests: Ballahoo, Diligence, Halifax and beyond...

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Really shows what an outstanding piece of equipment it really is

Michael

Shipwrights of Central Ohio

 

Current Build: ...

Completed Builds: Queen Anne Barge - SyrenPinnace - MSHalifax 1768 - LSSMurrelet - PygmySwift 1805 - AL 

Future Builds: Surly (because i'm definitely not so Cheerful), Echo cross-section.....

 

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35 minutes ago, CharlieZardoz said:

Hi everyone just an update, here it is a 1 mm strip! This one was made of basswood but if I was able to do basswood this precise, harder woods should be even easier. I followed the advice of 3/8" by 1mm and then cut the strip. I wouldn't say I'm great at it yet but I have the means now to keep at it and practice. Thank you all for assistance in helping me understand to usage of the machine. What a smooth cut! 😊

 

 

I'm curious, what size blade did you use?

Richard

Current Build: Early 19th Century US Revenue Cutter (Artesania Latina "Dallas" - messed about)

Completed Build: Yakatabune - Japanese - Woody Joe mini

Member: Nautical Research Guild & Midwest Model Shipwrights

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That looks great Z... knew you could do it! Just remember on harder woods you create more heat so a little more offset at the back of the fence helps.....

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Thanks all! Will take into account for heat. Richard i used the smallest/finest blade in the set. I'll add a picture once I'm back home again. 

Build on hold: HM Sultana 1/64th scale

 

Current Build: 31 ton Doughty revenue cutter as USRC Active 1/64th scale (in progress)

 

Future Interests: Ballahoo, Diligence, Halifax and beyond...

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