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James H

Professional Building Slip - Hobbyzone

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Professional Building Slip
Hobbyzone

Catalogue # HZ-PSM1
Available from Hobbyzone for £50.00

 

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We recently took a look at Hobbyzone's Small Building Slip, catering to hull lengths of an average of 600mm to 800mm maximum, but if you want something for larger hulls and with even more flexibility, then today, we take a look at the Professional Building Slip. Hobbyzone has asked me to build this as an assembly guide for them, to help to negate any incorrect assembly which has found its way into some completed slips, and they also intend to link this guide for general reference. Some errors that customers have made pertain to parts orientation, so with this guide, we hope to show you how to successfully complete this mini-project.

 

First of all, the Professional Building Slip caters to hulls up to 100cm in length, so will obviously take in many of the larger kits in our hobby, plus those impressive POF scratch builds we aspire to. This product also varies from its smaller cousin by the ability to be able to rotate a fixed hull through 360°. Of course, the slip can be used for everything from laying the keel/false keel, through to erecting the formers/bulkheads, and then to simply hold and rotate a semi-assembled hull whilst you plank and even fit out the hull at advanced stages of assembly, as well as act as a simple cradle. The completed unit has a length of 100cm, a width of 25cm and will take a keel of out to 7mm in thickness.

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Packed into a card box, this HEAVY box has all parts within protected by many layers of bubblewrap. Construction is from MDF, with some parts being faced in plastic and engraved with the CNC router for measurements etc. A hefty hardware bag is also included. All you will need to assemble the Professional Building Slip is:

 

  • Wood glue
  • Craft knife
  • Clamps

 

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Instructions are provided on a single sheet of paper, along with an amendment slip stating the use for some included nails. We'll mention this later in the build. 

 

 

 

 

CONSTRUCTING THE PROFESSIONAL BUILDING SLIP

 

1. Before we can start to assemble this project, all parts need to be released from the CNC-routed sheets. A couple of shallow tags are all that connect the parts to their sheets, and these can simply be cut through with a regular craft knife.

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2. Once all parts are released, remove any traces of the MDF tags that held them onto the frames. A craft knife is all that is required for this.

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3. I now construct the guide bars that sit either side of the slip, using Titebond III glue to secure. Please note the orientation of the vertical parts, and the hex nut head position. These items are mirrored. 

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4. Each of these guide bars will hold a clamp that will grip the various formers/bulkheads of your model. To begin their construction, I glue the following items together.

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5. When these had set, I sat them on top of each other. DO NOT GLUE!

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6. NOW, I may glue the other halves of the clamps into place. Sitting the two sections together merely ensures that the clamp faces are parallel to each other...nothing more.

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7. With everything fully dry, the clamps are fitted to the guide bars that I previously made, using the nuts, bolts and washers in the hardware pack. Again, not the orientation of the clamps in the guide bars, and that their positions are mirrored.

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8. Now I will construct the keel clamp holders that secure to the vertical platforms at each side of the Professional Building Slip. Here, we just push the two nuts firmly into position on the backplates.

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9. Using wood glue, attach the keel clamp holder faces to the backplates. Please note the orientation with regard to the hex-head positions, and ensure that everything is square.

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10. Now we can construct the keel clamps, in exactly the same way that we made them for the guide bars in the earlier stages. Firstly, glue the parts you see together, using wood glue.

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11. Glue the opposite side to the two clamps, and use a bolt to ensure that the holes are aligned. Remember, these two keel clamps in the photo are only sat on top of each other to ensure that the jaws are equidistant. Do not glue them together, of course!

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12. When all parts are set, fit the keel clamps to the clamp holders, using the nuts, bolts and washers. Please note that the positions of the bolts can be changed to suit the model you are building.

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13. Each of the keel clamps we have just built, is secured to a moveable guide that sit at either side of the Professional Building Slip. To build the guides, I first glue the two supports in position on each of the guide faces.

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14. Now, NOTING ORIENTATION of the baseplate, each in turn is glued to the vertical face and left to thoroughly set. 

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15. Glue the feet to the underside of each of the moveable guides.

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16.  Using the supplied nuts and bolts, fasten the keep clamps to the moveable guides.

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17. We can now build the vertical face which helps us to ensure the model's bulkheads and frames are vertical and even in height on both sides. Firstly, glue the supports to the vertical face.

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18. Now glue the feet.

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19. At this point, I decide to glue the parts together for the guide which slides up and down this vertical plate.

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20. Now I can bring this guide together with the main assembly and fit it with the nut and bolt, so it may be adjusted. I also glue the main white face to the vertical guide plate.

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21. You need to clear some workbench space now as we start to assemble the baseboard. Start by pushing the nuts into the hex-head shaped holes.

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22. Turn over the baseboard so the nuts are UNDERNEATH, and then apply glue to the top side. Fit the white plastic-faced panel onto this and clamp together until FULLY SET!

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23. Un-clamp the glued boards and flip it over so the white face in on the bottom. Now, sit the remaining board on top of this, with the screw head indents facing upwards. Using the supplied screws, fit the board into position.

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24.Using the supplied bolts and washers, fit the various assemblies to the baseboard, as thus. REMEMBER that the small edge clamps  that you see fastened to the horizontal keel clamp halves are only PRESSED into position and they are NOT glued. This allows them to be repositioned to accommodate the positions of the frames/bulkheads of your model.

 

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*******NOTE*******
A small number of nails are in included in the pack and there is an amendment sheet to indicate their use. These can be driven through the back end of the various clamps to strengthen them. Remember that these parts will bend as you tighten them, but for me, I would prefer to mostly use thin strips of packing if the keel and bulkheads are significantly thinner than the clamps, as this will remove most of the stress from them.

 

That's it...your Professional Building Slip is COMPLETE! 

Here are some photos showing its use.

 

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My sincere thanks to Hobbyzone for sending this out for review on Model Ship World. To purchase, click the link at the top of the article.

 

 

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I actually have a Comment on the instructions @James H, regarding steps 7, 12 and 20.

 

I have placed the Nuts in the Hex-Holes same as in step 8, this way it seems easier to remove the screw if repositioning of the clamp is needed - perhaps for the holders from step 7 and 20 it is not that important, as you would only unscrew them a bit to change the angle/position but in case of the front and back holder (step 12) i would rather suggest to place the nuts in the cutouts - this screw will be more often taken out and you might damage the socket if you do it a few times.

 

Also you can see on this pictures, that's how Wojciech has it on his site:

http://www.hobbyzone.pl/data/gallery/256_600x600.jpg

http://www.hobbyzone.pl/data/gallery/253_600x600.jpg

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9 minutes ago, Jasseji said:

I actually have a Comment on the instructions @James H, regarding steps 7, 12 and 20.

 

I have placed the Nuts in the Hex-Holes same as in step 8, this way it seems easier to remove the screw if repositioning of the clamp is needed - perhaps for the holders from step 7 and 20 it is not that important, as you would only unscrew them a bit to change the angle/position but in case of the front and back holder (step 12) i would rather suggest to place the nuts in the cutouts - this screw will be more often taken out and you might damage the socket if you do it a few times.

 

Also you can see on this pictures, that's how Wojciech has it on his site:

http://www.hobbyzone.pl/data/gallery/256_600x600.jpg

http://www.hobbyzone.pl/data/gallery/253_600x600.jpg

 

Thanks for that. Depending on application, you could well be right. This is a pretty flexible system and the hardware can be changed around to accommodate the model. It's easy enough to remove and rotate these parts, thankfully. I also find it easier to drive the bolt from the socket, instead of the nuts.

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5 minutes ago, James H said:

 

Thanks for that. Depending on application, you could well be right. This is a pretty flexible system and the hardware can be changed around to accommodate the model. It's easy enough to remove and rotate these parts, thankfully. I also find it easier to drive the bolt from the socket, instead of the nuts.

indeed, but i have my doubts how often i can do that before the socket is damaged, you dont need to take out the nut (only buy more nuts) ;)

 

Anyway, i am looking now to replace all the screws with butterfly-screws ;)

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I've been using mine for a couple of years now. Big enough to easily handle the ME Confederacy. Configuration is very flexible. I've even used some the

parts independent of the base. You won't use all the fixtures all the time. The wing nut idea is the way to go.

Is it better than what works for you right now? Probably not but I think it's pretty handy and have not been tempted to use anything else since I got it.

 

Cheers, Harley 

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10 hours ago, tigerdvr said:

I've been using mine for a couple of years now. Big enough to easily handle the ME Confederacy. Configuration is very flexible. I've even used some the

parts independent of the base. You won't use all the fixtures all the time. The wing nut idea is the way to go.

Is it better than what works for you right now? Probably not but I think it's pretty handy and have not been tempted to use anything else since I got it.

 

Cheers, Harley 

 

I'll be using wing nuts with mine too, so that's a neat idea. It's been a few years since I built a ship, and back in the day I used an Amati Keel Clamper, but that is way to small for my future projects of HMS Vanguard and Revenge. This building slip is perfect for the job.

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Just a question: The slip can hold keel, stern and bulkheads into position. It can even be used to turn the model side-upwards. But it looks as if there is little margin when the stern has not the same thickness as the MDF-piece.  (the clamps in step 6 and 16 look rather rigid to me) Is there any flexibility when your stern is thicker/thinner than the one of the example-model?

 

Jan

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11 minutes ago, amateur said:

Just a question: The slip can hold keel, stern and bulkheads into position. It can even be used to turn the model side-upwards. But it looks as if there is little margin when the stern has not the same thickness as the MDF-piece.  (the clamps in step 6 and 16 look rather rigid to me) Is there any flexibility when your stern is thicker/thinner than the one of the example-model?

 

Jan

There is flexibility there, but I put in my article that I would use shim pieces to pack out the clamps as much as possible.

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You couldn't turn a hull over for planking. If your ship's stem and stern were strong enough you could adjust the fore and aft clamps to work on the deck for instance. I just stick some pieces of firm Styrofoam under the side I want elevated to get a slant as needed.

 

Harley

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