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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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Thats the only reason why I personally want to do this POF cross section.   Its fun for me to solve those design issues.   In fact....since those pics were taken I have simplified and changes the frame design slightly.  The improved versions are even easier to build and assemble.   

 

Chuck

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Im just really bored with seeing so many Syren kits getting built.  Since there is a huge lack of American ships on the market that are any good I figured I would rectify that situation.  All you ever see are Syren and Constitution kits being built for the most part.....and the occasional Hahn colonial schooner.  Time to diversify as there are so many to choose from.  
 

 

 

 

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Have you ever considered one of the US Revenue cutters ( Baltimore Clippers)?

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Thanks.....I have all that plus much much more.   The research is well under way.

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Back to the Winnie....

 

To make the gratings for the gun deck you will need 3 packages of my cambered grating mini kits.  I will not be including these in the package for chapter 4 because I sell them in either cedar (less expensive) or boxwood.   Both would work and you guys can choose.  You will also need the grating jig.  One jig should last you the entire project.

 

To start, figure out how many cambered laser cut grating strips you will need to fit the space in your coaming.  Only build what you need.  For example this grating below on left side needed just seven grating strips in the jig.  My coaming were designed so each grating will fit perfectly when finished.  So dont use more than the space needs.

 

grating.jpg

Then use the supplied strips and press them into the notches carefully.  You will notice they will probably be too tight at first.  This is by design.  You need to run some sandpaper down the strip until it becomes a nice press-fit into the notches.  Once again only use the number of strips you need.  In this case 13 strips pressed firmly in position...

 

At this stage you should look it over to make sure no grating strips went crooked while you were fitting the batten strips.  If they did your holes wont be equal in shape and size.  Fix those now using a toothpick if they lean over.  Its easy to do.

 

grating1.jpg

Then paint on some watered down tite-bond.  Get it in all the nooks and crannies.   Not too thick.   If the holes start clogging....add more water.

Wait about 2 minutes but not so long that the glue will dry.  You want to carefully pry the grating free of the jig before it dries and is glued to the jig!!!

 

Then clean up the jig for the next grating.   But you are not done yet.  Brush more glue on the bottom underside of the grating.  Set it aside to dry fully.

 

grating2.jpg

Now you are probably saying.... how in world will these ugly dirty gratings look good.  Right now they look awful.

 

Snip off the excess from the perimeter and file the sides smooth.  Check the fit in the coaming.   Then start sanding the top surface.  In the center photo below you can see I have sanding that grating only on one side.  The finished grating can be seen coming to light.

 

The one on the right is completed.   These are cedar gratings by the way.   Now should you sand the bottom too?   You dont have to.....BUT, I am sure you have seen those contemporary models and have seen how thin they are.  I wouldnt recommend going too thin.   But it does change the way the grating looks in the coaming.   

 

grating3.jpg

 

And here are the finished coamings with the gratings in position.   

 

grating4.jpg

ANY QUESTIONS????

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I have completed all of the partners and coamings......I can almost start planking the deck now.  I forgot one last detail which I will show you guys soon.   But here are some pics. 

 

The foremast partners are made from laser cut parts and then I added the bolts.  I used 15 pound filament for those.  Use a #75 drill bit for the holes.

 

You can also see the base plate for the stove.   You have a few options with this.  I have laser cut a nice base for you.  At this time the base was most likely just a large iron plate....but in some cases they used flagstone or slate.  If you want to depict the iron plate....just flip it over and paint it matte black.   But if you want to show some slate or flagstones, I have laser etched the other side with a stone tile pattern.

 

Simply paint it matte black first but keep the coaming natural.  Then use some weathering powders on the tiles to make them only slightly lighter.  Leave the etched grout lines (which are deeper) dark black.   But use some grays and rust colors to make a subtle stone base.  Dont over do it!!!

 

The main mast partners were done the same as the fore mast partners.   None of these are glued in position yet but I will be doing so soon!!!

coaming4.jpg

coaming3.jpg

coaming5.jpg

coaming6.jpg

coaming8.jpg

coaming7.jpg

Any comments or questions!!!!!!!

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Chuck that is some beautiful work. What size are the decking planks going to be? I want to mill them now.

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I am going to use 1/4” wide planks.   But for those who prefer a slightly narrower look you can go with 7/32”.  They will be 3/64” thick.   You will need a few 5/16” wide plans also for cutting the scarph joints and tabbed deck planks every now and again.

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Mr. Passaro, this ship model is looking great, love all the details you are working in. Even though I think I saw you have a kit already, I found out that you can get a very realistic 1:48 scale Brodie Stove close to right time era that is made on a 3d printer.  https://www.shapeways.com/product/BT9SFSJNH/ships-stove-1-4-22-scale?optionId=63358126&li=marketplace

 

Brian D :)

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I don't build this model but it is a joy to follow this log! And also lot to learn from it.

Nice to see the mini version of you once in a while on the ship, it gives great perspective...it was quite a big ship!

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Thanks guys.  Yes I am aware of that stove.  I am not sure it would fit perfectly but I guess it wouldnt hurt to try.  Its a bit a cheat though....especially since we should at least try and build one.  Having it all done like that defeats the purpose in my opinion.   
 

It doesnt have to be made from scratch but it should at least be made....not just painted and stuck on the model.  Just my opinion though.

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I forgot to mention that I will not be drilling the deck for the masts since there wont be any.  I simply painted the circles black on the false decking.  The partners are really thick and then there will be the mast coats so these holes will be pretty deep.  So it will look nice and neat this way and nobody will ever know.  AND they are so deep that if anyone was crazy enough to rig her, that they would be sufficiently deep enough to stick your masts into.

 

coaming5.jpg

coaming8.jpg

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Sure the lighter one is cedar.....other than the slight color difference they both look and perform the task beautifully.  Keep in mind I just took this with my phone.   But you get the idea.

 

grating.jpg

 

Chuck

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This ship just keeps getting better and better!

 

👍👍👍 from me for a Winnie cross-section. I would love for it to have the main mast and rigging with it too or at least as an option.

 

 

 

 

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Chuck, thanks for showing the side by side of the gratings.  And Guillermo, thanks for asking about it.  I’ve been really enjoying the cedar on this project.  It is so easy to work with and looks terrific.

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Its from shapeways.  I just browsed 1/48 scale figures and picked a few.  Then a friend of mine painted them.  

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There is a lot to learn from following along that I will apply to Cheerful.  I'm also looking to see where you go next and at least for me I'm glad you're thinking smaller.  The Winnie is beautiful and amazing but just way bigger than I'm interested in doing, or for that matter have a place to display. 

 

Nonetheless the craftsmanship and design is incredible as is the work and other logs that are following along.

 

I like the figurine. Not a period sailor but, I'm assuming, a likeness of you just strolling around looking at the work as it progresses.  That's just too funny. (and if I have that all wrong, it would still be a fun thought).

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Thanks....indeed it holds a close resemblance.   I am sad to say.    LOL.  It freaks out my kids when they see it.

 

Chuckcabinfloor.jpg

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3 hours ago, Chuck said:

Thanks....indeed it holds a close resemblance.   I am sad to say.    LOL.  It freaks out my kids when they see it.

🤣 I thought that was something that was custom made for you and I was going to ask where you were able to have it made like that. I would love one of me standing on the decks of my builds...or maybe a likeness of myself about 35 years ago or more!

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Does the 1/48 Chuck have a cigarette hanging out of his mouth?

 

Just curious - are you fitting her with guns?

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Funny...I will add one.  Its my last vise.  I cant seem to quit.

 

Yes, she will have guns.   Prototype below.  But with the carriages painted red.   

paintedcoaming.jpg

I havent decided on how many yet.   She was supposedly launched with 26 twelve pounders and 6 six pounders.   But my research indicates that during the revolution she carried 24 twelve pounders and 8 six pounders.   

 

I am leaning towards the later because that is the time period I am building.  It also allows me to show the last gunport closed which I prefer and also having 6 quarter deck guns and 2 f'castle guns.

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Capstan experiment one.  I got bored and burnt out making inventory items.  So I decided to test out my parts for making the lower capstan.  I have had the parts laser cut for a while.

 

I didnt take any construction photos as this was just a test but keep in mind this is way before we will actually need it.  I am always just a little ahead with the design stuff.   So I will make another and document each step.   I want to make the center spindle a bit heavier that goes between decks above the capstan drum.   So I will tweak that before I make a new one.

 

But what I wanted to show you guys is how I did it.  I tried a new design for fitting the chocks into the whelps.

 

lowercapstan.jpg

Below you can see my very first proof of concept testing to see if I could laser etch notches on both sides of the whelps.  It worked beautifully.  So all you need to do is slide the chocks in after test their fit.   This was a challenge even at this scale because these parts are still pretty tiny.

 

lowercapstan1.jpg

 

The other parts including the capstan drum are all built as usual in layers on a 1/16" x 1/16" stick to register them.  Very similar to the way I designed the stern lantern mini-kit for the winnie.

 

This was a fun mini kit to build and will look great painted or left natural.  I will detail its construction in Chapter 5.....sorry to jump the gun.  I couldnt help myself.  These will be made available as stand alone mini kits in 1/4" scale and 3/16" scale as well.

 

lantern.jpg

 

 

 

 

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