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Another one bites the dust.

 

Back in the (fairly recent) day when "Ships in Scale" only published in B&W, and was literally the only ship model building mag left in the States (not counting research and prototype focus mags like the NRG Journal and Steamship Bill), I openly wondered why the USA could only support this single title, and at a mere 6 issues a year, while the UK and Germany each supported TWO magazines, MONTHLIES, in full color? ("Marine Modelling International", "Model Boats", "ModellWerft", und "Schiffs Modell")... and each of these countries having only about 25% of the US population!

 

Well, one more is gone-- Marine Modelling International's parent company, Traplet Publishing, is in receivership, and it appears not to be a mere re-org. This actually takes a number of hobby titles out of print in one swoop. Discussed in more familiar detail at Model Boat Mayhem: http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,58598.0.html

 

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Speaking from experience when these GB publishing companies fold and then reorganize they do not recognize their previous loyal subscribers and do not honor the remaining subscriptions.  Start all over and then hope you get all you pay for because again history shows they have a very poor record of fulfilling the new subscriptions before they fold again. 

Kurt

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The print magazines started having issues about 20 years ago (not just the speciality mags) but I think the WWW will be killing the rest off. Naturally, there will be exceptions, but even newspapers etc. are staring at this trend.  They've all or will become road-kill on the Information Super Highway.  Pity, IMO. There's something about holding paper with printing on it like a magazine or a book.

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Sometimes people can't see the forest for the trees. I ran the Technical Documentation code for Navy Lightweight Torpedoes for 5 years. There was a major push to go completely digital and do away with printed manuals. All maintenance procedures would be put on iPad type devices. I fought this tooth and nail as it was and still is real short sighted. Ever try to read a iPad screen on the flight deck of a Destroyer during the day in the Arabian Gulf? Impossible. How about picking up that device with greasy hands. How about dropping it on the deck or over the side? A paper book survives all these scenarios. Going all digital in anything is a terrible idea even hobby magazines. But it is going to happen just because of cost in printing and shipping. The dollar always has the final say even over common sense.

.

 

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Ah, but how did you just respond to this topic- digitally with instant publication and near instant response, or via a letter to the editor, with a 3 month leadtime to publication, and another 3 months for an answer?

Realize that digital editions of published magazines aren't the competition to print... but rather, Wikipedia and forums like this. I don't have a single digital subscription... but I practically live on several forums, because they ARE convenient. 

 

I don't miss print. I have several magazines laying around that I never seem to get to... all while having posted scores of times online. I do miss the curated and edited content, it's a little bit Wild West online... but the range of material is nearly infinite, compared to what is pared down to fit in a given magazine.

 

Get used to it, and let's learn to make the online content as useful as possible.

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Somewhere there's a compromise... other than digital magazines and having to print them out.   When a company stops printing a magazine, the paper ones sitll exist.  The digitals go off into the ether.  Some things just don't lend themselves well to digital just as monographs, but I digress.   One of the current trends in the web is to lock out printing out of pages or documents.  Not sure I like that either. i do understand piracy concerns but there's something about having a copy handy when you need it and the website is gone.

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Pat, there's a world of difference between reading an online newspaper, magazine, or web conference site like MSW, and reading a book/manual with hundreds of pages.  I don't want to even think about the eye and neck strain reading a digital book/manual that is 200-300-400 pages in length.  And with most digital edition newspapers you have to have a paid subscription to post a comment of e-letter to the editor. 

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No argument... except that I've read several e-books of multi-hundreds of pages length, no prob. 

 

But that's not the topic... point is, a paper magazine has gone under, and I hold that online sources like this offer a realistic and even improved alternative for the info one could find in magazines.

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Put a bullet through a CD containing all your Technical Manuals and put a bullet through a printed Tech Manual which one can you still use?EMP wipes all electronics unless heavily protected doesn't bother a book. Electronic books and magazines are very convenient no doubt but going all digital is foolish.

 

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Just from one Neanderthal to another - I like a real hard copy book.  I just don't like reading a book on a Kindle or whatever.  I like to be able to easily riffle back to a previous page or section, or illustration, without going back one page at a time, or "go to" a random page and hope I'm close.

 

Several decades back, when my employer decided to get us all e-mail, desk tops, etc. the provider, who was training us, wanted us to keep it in perspective, and made the memorable statement:

 

"The paperless office is about as useful as a paperless bathroom."

 

Never forgot that piece of wisdom.

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I'm a fervent reader, paper that is, I cannot enjoy - for whatever undefined reason whatsoever - the digital publications, whether that be a book, newspaper, or a magazine. When I've held a book and read it, it's mine. Not just on the shelf, but also in my mind. I can read it fast or slow, but enjoy it either way. Digital publications I must drag myself through.

 

I'm a programmer, and see the *** screen all day (unless I have to attend a meeting) if I do want to use a screen, privately, I must enjoy it, else I do not want to see it. I enjoy MSW, so I sit at my keyboard and in front of my screen. If I didn't have this, I wouldn't be using it, for the digital environment is starting to be very annoying. Since I do spend most of my working hours "enjoying" the digital environment, I have to take care, as Jack already mentioned, not to strain certain parts of my body. The latter wouldn't happen with a piece of paper, because you could take a comfortable position when reading. Nor does paper radiate, the latter does tire your eyes. I wonder what the effects will be in the long term on eyes which have been almost constantly forced to use digital media.

 

Besides the nostalgic fact of loosing paper as information medium, there is another loss: Labour. Our digitising has cost a lot of labour, and not all the loss has been replaced by work opportunities in that digital society. The magazine (for me will always be a printed item) goes into a deep and dark wormhole, and with it goes a certain sentiment, and a lot of knowledge, which is unique to the print industry. Another loss for human kind IMO.

 

There is one more thing to be careful of: Can you trust what you find on the internet!?

 

 A thing to consider: How long before we digitise ourselves into oblivion ...?

 

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My 20 year old daughter won't touch a digital book. It must be a paper, printed book, and she is an avid reader. Being from another older generation, I too am stuck on paper, printed books and magazines. For some reason, I find them easier to read.

What to trust when you read or listen has always been an issue. Truth is not often easily discerned. There are many sources of information that are either flat out false, or are trying to further an unhealthy agenda.

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I can read novels in a Kindle or tablet, BUT books such as "The Art of Shipmodeling", "The Masting and Rigging of English Ships of War", to name just 2 out of the hundreds of similar books in the market, they MUST be in printed paper. The weight, the smell, the photographs in color or b/w... no way they will ever be replaced and welcomed by a digital version.

I will surely miss the printed magazines if they ever go away.

Edited by Ulises Victoria
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I enjoy the tactile experience of books.  There are many I would not consider obtaining in digital format.  I also enjoy holding a print magazine or journal.  I am, however, a realist.  We have more than 500 books still in storage, with no space in the house for them.  I like the option of obtaining magazines as PDF files for future reference.  I have no space to keep printed copies.

 

The digital spin (Kindle etc.) are not as appealing to me.  Many books, sure, but not magazines.

 

Edited by trippwj
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 I guess it's all in how the magazine is produced. I have a couple digital subscription to magazines and they vary wildly in quality. 

 

 I have been getting National Geographic magazine for many years as a digital subscription. It is fantastic! I believe it is significantly better than the paper copy. It is loaded with full interactive videos and sound clips with links to more information if you need it.  It has actual interviews with the subjects of the articles that have been video or audio recorded. It is professionally done to the highest level.  While I like holding a paper magazine the way National Geographic does this makes it so much better and so much more interesting that I will never be going back to just a paper copy. Also I was the one who helped move the couple thousand pounds of National Geographic out of my father's basement when he moved. 

 

 On the other hand I have a digital subscription to an outdoor magazine which is very difficult to read is very hard to zoom in on the small print articles and it offers no other additions such as the National Geo does. I actually prefer the paper version of that magazine. 

 

 In general I much prefer real books. There's just something about turning the page smelling the paper feeling the weight of the book.  For all books that I wish to keep which obviously includes all ship modeling books I will gladly pay a premium for a print copy.  

 

One thing that I've noticed over the last year or two as I'm studying for my board recertification examinations is that I tend to learn and remember better if I'm holding a real book and studying out of the real paper book. I don't seem to remember as much if I'm just looking at a digital screen on my computer or iPad.  I'm not sure of the extra stimulus that comes from holding the weight of the book and the feel of the paper etc. tends to lend to better memory recall later. It's just my vague feeling that I remember things much better if I read that from an actual book.  Now for science fiction, fantasy, romance, dimestore novel type books I will go digital all the way as I definitely do not want those clogging up my house. 

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My entire professional life has been devoted to the longevity of books and bound materials, Ive published on the issue, run a lab dedicated to the conservation of such materials and teach.   I read almost everything on a screen, check out all my library books via E-Book and often scan items I want to save into a digital form.   I dont have space, the back strength or the patience to devote to "things" like books.   I read more than most people, utilize my library more than most and work in a library YET I loathe lugging around books...   Ive just done too much of it.   

 

That said...  My personal collecting habits are with books.  I own an extensive library of Maritime Heritage, Age of Sail, Ship Modelling and avidly seek out and purchase books on these subjects, particularly first editions.  I own hundreds of books, but my own proclivities are as a librarian, with a specific purpose.  I won't waste valuable shelf space or modeling money with the latest overly-expensive hardback Stephen King or Tom Clancy when I can check it out at the library, read it completely, and not have to carry 5lbs of paper anywhere (as a bus-boat-train-bike commuter, yes all and in that order and everyday this is extremely good for my back). 

 

So it can go both ways...   there is nothing wrong with digital consumption, you just have to find what works for you.   If it doesnt at all, fine.  However, I submit that many folks that have had a bad experience probably just haven't found the right tool.      I value the library as a resource, and because the publishing houses are going digital so are the libraries and to my mind the local library is one of the only things that we get back for our tax dollar that is worth its weight.   

 

It is sad to see some of these smaller publications going the way of the dinosaur though, however I hope folks dont consider ending their interest and support of these efforts simply because they are no longer available in paper.   People work very hard, often at little profit to provide these things and are not likely making a concious decision to screw you by choosing to go digital...   I understand that ultimately these decisions lie with the publishers, but remember there still is a little guy at the very end of that long and corporate string who is hoping the decision doesnt drive you away. 

 

Edited by maturin
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I belong to a men's book group.  We meet once a month at a local restaurant. Each of us has the opportunity to tell the others what has been happening to them over the past month, and then we discuss the book.  Book selections are eclectic, ranging from local authors to classics, and are arrived at by consensus.  Our ages range from the late 50's to over 80.

 

Of our dozen members, perhaps a third are dedicated e-book readers.  Another group only read hard copy, in part because they usually get books from the library.  The third group is like me.  If we are reading a novel, I usually read it as an e-book.  I can get it instantly, it is sometimes cheaper, and it is not something that I want to keep.  Works of nonfiction, particularly those with illustrations and maps I would rather read as hard copy as it is much easier to refer back to these materials.

 

Books bought for my permanent collection are printed, preferably hard bound.  I hope that publishers will not be seduced by the trendiness of e-books and abandon the printed word as many of us still want to read it.

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

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Roger and Cog capture my feelings on this. Digital is fine for light linear reading, especially fiction, but I cannot stand trying to work through a technical text of any kind (involving figures, illustrations, or the need to move back and forth in the text) in digital form. Plus I, too, spend a lot of work time on the computer and really don't like the additional eye strain of reading for pleasure on a screen.

 

I have a Kindle, but only use it for reading when traveling. Any book or magazine I care about comes in print. And it's not just age, I'm under 40.

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  • 7 months later...
On 8/3/2017 at 8:19 AM, maturin said:

I value the library as a resource, and because the publishing houses are going digital so are the libraries and to my mind the local library is one of the only things that we get back for our tax dollar that is worth its weight.   

Well said, my wife is a librarian and we have had many discussions about this very topic. I also read a lot of books from the library and now that I can walk to the local one it is even better, then a short walk to the coffee shop......there goes an afternoon.

 

Michael

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My 2 cents, I am also long in the tooth and enjoy a cup of coffee and paper in the morning 55 year old habit.

Digital media does have its advantages ( if pages have not been omitted or changed ala Wicapedia) that being said you purchase an item today computer, washing machine yard item no more paper manuals, you have a link to download the manual to computer. By golly gee that's neat. Neat until your under washer machine and the pics on the phone was the wrong page and have to go back to the computer. I do get it the cost savings of omitting paper manuals I am sure is significant.

 

All this doesn't mean a hoot when the Russians and Chinese finally  hack everything and the manual you have online to repair a  central heating unit turns out to be for a 1957 Ford Galaxie or a link to Hooters Girls. Sorry 3 cents worth.

 

I am old, shortsighted, miss my XP, and my flip phone. I do Like my morning paper which shortly will be coming to an end.;)

Edited by John Allen
spelling
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I have to add a caveat (I can hear your groans now). All things pass I get that, all new is not necessarily good.

I do embrace technology at times it simplifies our lives. It can also control us to the point of being harmful.

 

Wikipedia and Facebook. People do not realize the danger they place themselves in. Yes its nice I can send pics to Granny of the children, or their 1st school day,or I am on vacation look at the pics I just posted. It is nice info sent immediately. I don't have to write a letter or pay for a stamp. People trawl the Facebook site looking for this info. Police, Private Investigators, Burglars, thieves, pedophiles. People open up their lives its not good and it is dangerous.

As the shadow said what evil lurks in dark places.

 

 

 

 

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You probably getting fed up with me 1 more. I am really getting blank.

When sources can influence or change the outcome of an election (Internationally I might add) we are all in trouble my last post probably getting to political. I apologize am getting a cocktail its 4pm somewhere:D

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For the past 15 years I have worked part time as a volunteer historian/ technical advisor for the SS Meteor Whaleback ship museum in Superior, Wisconsin.  Over time we have accumulated a large mass of information documenting the vessel’s history and studies for future preservation and restoration.

 

A couple of years ago the Executive Director began a formal process to archive this information. I assumed that she would have it scanned and saved as digital information.  I was surprised to learn that the museum standard is hard copy paper.  A big reason for this is apparently the fear that digital media saved with a particular technology; eg. floppy discs will become unusable by  rapidly changing technology.

 

Roger 

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2 hours ago, Roger Pellett said:

A big reason for this is apparently the fear that digital media saved with a particular technology; eg. floppy discs will become unusable by  rapidly changing technology.

How utterly painful ... it does carry truth though. A lot of digital media has been changed and old ones can no longer be accessed because of e.g. missing hardware  ........

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